Actress-Director Soleil Moon Frye's second work "Sonny Boy" focuses on her often troubled relationship with her father actor Virgil Frye who suffers on Alzheimer's disease. From the ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews
1 win. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Herself
...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

Actress-Director Soleil Moon Frye's second work "Sonny Boy" focuses on her often troubled relationship with her father actor Virgil Frye who suffers on Alzheimer's disease. From the beginning of his career as a makeup artist on the set of Easy Rider, his work as a Elvis Presley double in New Orleans and his political support for the civil rights in Alabama to his work on the cornfields in Iowa and his Golden Gloves boxing championship Frye accompanies her father to re experience their past on a journey through the states. The longer their trip lasts, the more Mr. Frye's disease seems to worsen. Therefore it gets more and more difficult for both of them to cope with their lives and memories. Written by idler

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

4 April 2004 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A beautiful, and meaningful, slice of an American life and history
26 April 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Last night I was fortunate enough to catch a screening of the bio-pic, SONNY BOY, at the Newport Beach Film Festival. There was a warmth and beauty to this film that shown through in even in the most dangerous and sad moments, a joy that can be experienced only through absolutely honest discourse. Frye's work here can certainly be called courageous, as she deals with the very real troubles of a father who is suffering from Alzheimer's, in particular the fact that she has never really fully reconciled with him and his fading memory makes her efforts at this all the more difficult.

What makes this more than some sad and displaced Greek Tragedy, however, is the very real trip that the director and her father take through America, and American History. There is awesome footage in this film of many a young actor in the Golden Days of Hollywood, as well as of America's difficult transition through the Civil Rights movement. The camera's unflinching eye reflects alternately on the America of today, hopes lost and gained, and the America of Virgil Frye's colorful past, when those hopes were born.

In a very real sense, this movie is a tale of three trips. One, a journey of the mind and the heart, as one fades and the other beats as strong as ever -preserving some semblance of the man of old. A second journey is made in a very real and tactile manner across the varied geography of our great nation -from the Grand Canyon to the alleys of New Orleans to the brick churches of change in Alabama, and on... Finally, there is the perceptive journey through American history, as Frye traces her father's exploits throughout his life, and many of the lives he's touched.

Bravo, Soleil, and thank you.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page