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Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Violeta Ayala — “Cocaine Prison”

Cocaine Prison

Violeta Ayala is an award-winning Indigenous filmmaker and writer from Bolivia. Her other credits include “The Flight,” “The Bolivian Case,” and “Stolen,” which has won numerous awards and aired on PBS. Ayala is currently working on a documentary about black rights in Australia and a screenplay about her grandfather, leader of the Bolivian Communist Party and friend to Che Guevara. She is a founding member of United Notions Film.

Cocaine Prison” will premiere at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival on September 10.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Va: “Cocaine Prison” is a film about the ordinary people caught up in the drug war. We shot everything from ants to mountains and all things in between.

The film follows Daisy and Hernan, teenage siblings who dream of forming a band. They end up caught in the middle of a web beyond their imagination. Hernan is arrested while transporting cocaine from Bolivia to Argentina and is sent to San Sebastian Prison. While there, he meets Mario, a cocaine worker who has been in prison for years without a trial. While visiting the prison we gave cameras to Hernan, Mario, and other inmates and asked them to film. We made this film with their collaboration.

The film is very personal and character driven; it’s shot and put together like a fiction film. “Cocaine Prison” humanizes the drug workers while highlighting the unfairness of the drug war.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Va: I was tired of seeing the narrative of the gun-toting narco myth over and over on screen. I’m not saying Pablo Escobar or El Chapo don’t exist, but rather that those stories are the exception.

The majority of the people involved in making and transporting drugs are young and/or vulnerable. It’s a big global business and it works the same way that globalization does: Indigenous people, people of color, and the young and poor risk everything, while those at the top make the money.

These “drug workers” are not devilish or stupid; they are people whose lives depend on a business that those in power have determined to be illegal. Everyone is hurting in the North and the South. The drug workers are part of a long chain.

I wanted to tell this story from my eyes and my own experience. I’m an Indigenous filmmaker from Bolivia. I grew up with this war on drugs and it has affected my life. I watched through my window as the army tore apart families and detained and violently beat anyone they believed was working in the cocaine business.

During the 80s and 90s, poor farmers were the target of the DEA and Bolivian army. The war on drugs has failed. However, governments worldwide choose to continue punishing the most vulnerable rather than accept the failure and look for alternatives.

The war on drugs is not only racist, but is also colonialist. I believe we won’t have real democracies in Latin America until this drug war reaches an end.

It’s a very dangerous moment in our history. Bolivia is one of only four countries (all of which border the Amazon) that produces the coca leaf — the main ingredient to make cocaine. The tentacles of this drug war have stretched from the cities to the jungle. It affects our environment and the Indigenous groups in the middle of the Amazon, where they have lived for tens of thousands of years.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Va: I would like them to feel empathy. The drug war is a complex issue that affects us all.

There is an increased awareness of where our food comes from and how it is produced. When people consume illegal drugs, they have no idea where the substances come from and how they are produced. Because of the illegality of the drug trade, there is a disconnect about where drugs are coming from and the effect this industry has on the lives of others and the environment.

I want the audience to go further in questioning the global drug trade from a different point of view.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Va: The time it took to make the film. Every story is a journey on its own. We started filming seven years ago. We taught English and filmed inside San Sebastian Prison for almost four years. It was tough. I met Daisy and Hernan when they were 17 and 19, respectively. I watched them grow, and they are like family to me now.

Another big challenge was bringing the elements together. I wanted the film to shy away from a Western, stereotypical narrative that tries to explain everything to outsiders. My challenge was to bring a Western audience to our world.

The film isn’t based on interviews; it follows the real life stories of these people, up-close and personal. It tries to counter the Western narrative about the drug war through poetics and gentleness. The music is also part of that creative process. An Australian composer came to Bolivia and recorded Bolivian musicians, marrying a traditional film score with Andean instruments, melody, and sound.

Following my voice in a Western-dominated media was the biggest challenge.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Va: I have always funded my films through film foundations and broadcasters. “Cocaine Prison” has gained support from Sundance, MacArthur, Tribeca, Chicken and Egg, Cnc, Bertha BritDoc, Open Society Foundations, Screen Australia, Latin Public Broadcaster, and others.

It is draining to think of the time I spend writing grant applications. As you can imagine, most of the time it’s met with rejection.You have to have thick skin and really want to make the film.

I try and try and keep trying, always improving my applications and my materials so funders can understand what I’m trying to achieve.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Tiff?

Va: It’s the second time that I have a film at Tiff. My first documentary, “Stolen,” premiered at Tiff in 2009. “Stolen” had a very long and successful festival life that included close to 100 festivals and 16 awards.

I’m the first Bolivian filmmaker to have two films premiering in Toronto, and this year I’m also one of the two Australian directors at Tiff. “Sweet Country” director Warwick Thornton is Aboriginal, and I’m Quechua. This makes me incredibly proud.

There is an African proverb that says, “Until the story of the hunt is told by the lion, the tale of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.”

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Va: Best advice: Three-time Academy Award nominee Deborah Dickson (who is like the midwife of all of my films ) once told me that film is like a puzzle. You have to keep trying until you have every piece in its place so you can see the entire picture.

Worst advice: When I was at university in Australia, a classmate told me that I was wasting my time and that, because English wasn't my first language, I could never work in the industry.

I have endured a lot of racism and sexism through my career because I dare to be myself and don't usually compromise. It's hard to be an Indigenous filmmaker and a woman of color in a world dominated by white male filmmakers, funders, etc. I generally don't let racism and sexism bother me too much.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Va: I’m skeptical about giving advice because something that might have worked for me won’t necessarily work for another person.

Watch “Kung Fu Panda” and go wild on your own terms.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Va: Ava DuVernay’s “13th” for many reasons. It features a black woman telling us the story from her perspective. It’s a complex film told with so much dignity. It’s a film that everyone should watch to understand the deep roots of racism, slavery, domination, U.S. prisons, and the world.

I also love “Me and You and Everyone We Know” by Miranda July. Miranda takes us into her world, and I really love that. She doesn’t try to tell a big story or whitewash a narrative. Miranda really focuses on her experiences and is creatively wonderful.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Va: I believe change is on our hands and we have to keep fighting. Change doesn’t come from the top down, but rather the other way around.

Change won’t happen because few opportunities have arisen in the last few years — this is a naive way to see it. We live in a male-dominated world, and the film industry is no different. If we talk about what is fair, only women should make films for the next 100 years. Maybe then we could talk about opportunity.

As a woman filmmaker of color, I also believe that we need to be conscious about who is telling the story; we must not repeat the mistake of colonization that male filmmakers made. We can’t talk about feminism without talking about racism, opportunity, and privilege. Women filmmakers are people, not a statistic. It’s so unfair to try to measure our involvement after a few opportunities have been thrown at us without a real and deep change in the system.

We are creating and raising our voices. This is a process, and I’m sure we will change the system — we the women of the world.

https://medium.com/media/da01234b385347c62d09e7bf421a597d/href

Tiff 2017 Women Directors: Meet Violeta Ayala — “Cocaine Prison” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Film Festival Roundup: AFI Docs Reveals Full Slate, Laff Announces Its Opener, and More

Film Festival Roundup: AFI Docs Reveals Full Slate, Laff Announces Its Opener, and More
Keep up with the always-hopping film festival world with our weekly Film Festival Roundup column. Check out last week’s Roundup right here.

Lineup Announcements

– The American Film Institute (AFI) has announced the full slate of films for AFI Docs 2017, a five-day documentary celebration in the nation’s capital. Each year, the festival is committed to providing artists with the opportunity to present powerfully told, artfully constructed stories — and to connect audiences and filmmakers with policy leaders. AFI Docs 2017 runs June 14 – 18 in Washington, DC, and Silver Spring, MD.

“The 2017 slate of films reflects AFI Docs’ mission to celebrate powerfully told stories and the people at the heart of them,” said Michael Lumpkin, Director, AFI Docs. “Documentaries continue to play an important role in our country regardless of partisan lines. No matter your background, these human stories have the power to inform and inspire. We look forward to another year of dynamic nonfiction cinema.
See full article at Indiewire »

Films added to Sundance London line-up by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-05-19 14:45:08

Sex, Lies, And Videotape, starring Andie MacDowell, joins the Sundance London line-up. Three films have been added to this year's Sundance London line-up under the strand title 'Redford Recommends'.

The films, which will be screened from original 35mm prints, are Steven Soderbergh's 1989 directorial debut Sex, Lies, And Videotape, Miranda July's debut Me And You And Everyone We Know (2005) and James Marsh's 2008 Oscar-winning documentary Man On Wire.

The festival say the trio of films have been personally selected by the Sundance founder. Tickets for the additional screenings go on sale today....
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Sundance ’17 and on to Rotterdam ‘17: Interview with Kirsten Tan, Writer and Director of ‘Pop Aye’

Sundance ’17 and on to Rotterdam ‘17: Interview with Kirsten Tan, Writer and Director of ‘Pop Aye’
This first feature of Kirsten Tan premiered in Sundance ‘17 World Cinema Dramatic Competition. Its provenance is Singapore but it takes place in Thailand. It continued onward to the Hivos Tiger Competition at Iffr (R’dam).

The thrill of interviewing here in Sundance is that you see a film; you have an impression and while it is still fresh you meet the filmmakers without having much time for any research or reflection. And then you get to see them again as “old friends” when you meet again in Rotterdam.

As Kirsten, her producer Weijie Lai and I sat down at the Sundance Co-op on Main Street here in Park City, I really had little idea of where the interview would take us, somewhat analogously to her film in which an architect, disenchanted with life in general, being put aside as “old” in his own highly successful architectural firm and in a stale relationship with his wife,
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

‘Half the Picture’ Exclusive Clips: New Documentary Examines Hollywood’s Discriminatory Hiring Practices

  • Indiewire
‘Half the Picture’ Exclusive Clips: New Documentary Examines Hollywood’s Discriminatory Hiring Practices
The new feature documentary “Half the Picture” explores gender equality, discriminatory hiring practices and the struggle for female creatives in Hollywood through conversations with dozens of top female film and TV directors. The film has spent over nine months in production and features over 40 interviews, and now director Amy Adrion and the rest of her team have turned to the Seed&Spark crowdfunding community to raise $30,000 to complete the principal photography. Watch a series of brief clips from the film below.

Read More: Female Directors in Hollywood Share Their Stories in ‘Half the Picture

“‘Half the Picture’ is the culmination of my lifetime as a film lover,” says director Amy Adrion, “and is a tribute to the women who inspired me to make films. Also, it was important to me that we ‘be the change’ women filmmakers and film lovers want to see in the world. On the production, I
See full article at Indiewire »

The Female Gaze, Anyone? Isabel Sandoval on her Ifp Film Week Project, Lingua Franca

Me and You and Everyone We Know. Pariah. Obvious Child. Lingua Franca. The first three titles? Music to my ears. That last one? Sounds like Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 to me, mostly because it’s my third feature screenplay (and English-language debut). It’s also been selected for No Borders at Ifp Film Week, where those amazing films got their start. As a NYC-based Filipina filmmaker, I can’t be in better company this week. My debut feature, Senorita, a pulpy political noir that’s a love child of Fassbinder’s Lola and late-’90s Almodovar, had its world premiere in competition at Locarno. It has […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Meryl Streep-Funded The Writers Lab Announces 12 Female Screenwriters For Second Annual Workshop

Meryl Streep-Funded The Writers Lab Announces 12 Female Screenwriters For Second Annual Workshop
Read More: 7 Best Screenwriting Apps to Make Life Easier

New York Women in Film & Television (Nywift) and Iris , a collective of women filmmakers, have officially announced the 10 selected screenwriters who will participate in this year’s The Writers Lab. Now in its second year, The Writers Lab is a program where emerging female screenwriters team up with industry mentors to help develop their screenplays. The lab is open to women over the age of 40 and is funded by Meryl Streep. This year’s participants include:

Carol Carpenter, “The Guadalupe”

Melody Cooper, “The Sound of Darkness”

Meredith DePaolo, “Devil’s Eye””

Nancy Duff, “Dead Drop

Kate Erickson, “Roll With It”

Tina Field Howe, “Drone War

Christina Hulen, “A Gentleman of Good Hope”

Christine Toy Johnson, “Jumping the Third Rail”

Nanci Katz-Ellis, “Blink”

Leslie Longworth, “One Bad Astronaut”

Barbara Nunberg, “Willful Blindness

Stephanie Stanley, “The Radical”

The mentors who will be included
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Trainspotting,’ ‘Simon Killer,’ ‘The Loneliest Planet’ & More Indies Headed to Hulu in July — See Our Curated List

‘Trainspotting,’ ‘Simon Killer,’ ‘The Loneliest Planet’ & More Indies Headed to Hulu in July — See Our Curated List
A great many shows and movies are coming to Hulu next month, some more notable than others. To skip the chaff and go straight to the wheat, allow us to collate and curate a selection of the most notable titles available to stream in July:

“48 Hours” and “Another 48 Hours”

“The Aviator”

Berberian Sound Studio

Broadway Danny Rose

The Brothers Bloom

“Devil’s Pass”

Dirty Wars

“Dirty Work”

“‘Don’t Look Now”

Escape From Alcatraz

Finding Neverland

Fish Tank

“Flashdance”

Gimme the Loot

“Glory”

Read More: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’: Reed Morano To Direct Elisabeth Moss In The Hulu Series

“Hackers”

“Hunger”

The Hunt for Red October

“In the Loop”

“Jimmy P”

Liberal Arts

Like Someone in Love

The Loneliest Planet

Lonesome Jim

“Manderlay”

Me and You and Everyone We Know

Mommie Dearest

“Phoenix”

“Rosemary’s Baby”

Read More: ‘Transparent’ Ratings Lag Behind Rivals on Netflix & Hulu

“Sightseers”

Simon Killer
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘Tracktown’

Film Review: ‘Tracktown’
“A quotation is a handy thing to have about, saving one the trouble of thinking for oneself, always a laborious business.” — A.A. Milne

In “Tracktown,” real-life distance runner Alexi Pappas plays aspiring Olympic athlete Plumb Marigold, who bombards us with quotations pilfered from inspirational posters, popular movies and the pages of Bartlett’s, padding the film’s gratuitous voiceover with platitudes by everyone from Mary Lou Retton to Albus Dumbledore. Plumb (whose name is meant to be as adorably one-of-a-kind as Diablo Cody or Juno MacGuff) shows undeniable skill on the track, but is severely stunted in most other respects, especially all things emotional or intellectual, taking 90 minutes to arrive at her first original thought in a film that is itself almost entirely recycled from other indies, mostly of the early-aughts Fox Searchlight variety.

Set in and named after Eugene, Ore., “Tracktown” could be a decade-later sequel to “Little Miss Sunshine,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in January

10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in January
It's January, and if your new year's resolution was to watch better movies, then good news: We've got you covered (The bad news: You have terribly low ambitions). From comfort-food classics to a new Netflix documentary series that finds a comedian completely reinventing herself (and does not involve murder cases), there's a hot, hungover mess of great new things to stream this month. So sit back, relax, and enjoy our guide to the best of what's new to view during the first month of 2016. Because you don't have to get
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Nywift and Iris Announce Inaugural Participants for The Writers Lab, Funded by Meryl Streep

Back in April, I interviewed the directors of Nywift and Iris about their noted launch of The Writers Lab, a retreat for women screenwriters over 40, that received a substantial amount of funding from Meryl Streep. The 12 inaugural participants, listed below, were selected from a pool of over 3,500 applicants. The eight mentors for the weekend long September lab are Jessica Bendinger (Bring It On, Aquamarine), Caroline Kaplan (Time Out of Mind, Me and You and Everyone We Know), Meg LeFauve (Inside Out), Darnell Martin (Cadillac Records), Lydia Dean Pilcher (Darjeeling Limited, The Talented Mr. Ripley), Gina Prince-Bythewood (Secret Life of Bees, Beyond the Lights, Mary Jane Skalski (Win Win, The Station Agent) and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Nywift and Iris Announce Inaugural Participants for The Writers Lab, Funded by Meryl Streep

Back in April, I interviewed the directors of Nywift and Iris about their noted launch of The Writers Lab, a retreat for women screenwriters over 40, that received a substantial amount of funding from Meryl Streep. The 12 inaugural participants, listed below, were selected from a pool of over 3,500 applicants. The eight mentors for the weekend long September lab are Jessica Bendinger (Bring It On, Aquamarine), Caroline Kaplan (Time Out of Mind, Me and You and Everyone We Know), Meg LeFauve (Inside Out), Darnell Martin (Cadillac Records), Lydia Dean Pilcher (Darjeeling Limited, The Talented Mr. Ripley), Gina Prince-Bythewood (Secret Life of Bees, Beyond the Lights, Mary Jane Skalski (Win Win, The Station Agent) and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Sundance Institute Sets Creative Film Producing Labs and Summit

From July 27 to August 3 at the Sundance Resort in Utah, the Institute holds its Creative Film Producing Initiative including its latest series of Labs and a special Summit that brings together over 50 industry leaders. The focus is on nurturing the next generation of indie producers. Participants of the Feature Film Creative Producing Lab (July 27 – July 31) work under Creative Advisors including producers Lindsay Doran ("Sense and Sensibility"), Lynette Howell Taylor ("The Place Beyond the Pines"), Gina Kwon ("Me and You and Everyone We Know"), Paul Mezey ("Beasts of the Southern Wild"), Jay Van Hoy ("Beginners") and director Matthew Ross ("28 Hotel Rooms"). The Documentary Film Creative Producing Lab (July 27 – August 1) brings together documentarians under Creative Advisors include producers Julie Goldman ("Best of Enemies"), Bonni Cohen ("3 1/2 Minutes, 10 Bullets"), Ryan Werner (of Cinetic...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Say What You Will About the Academy - But Some Cool International Names Among 2015 New Member Invitees

Academy invitee Eddie Redmayne in 'The Theory of Everything.' Academy invites 322 new members: 'More diverse and inclusive list of filmmakers and artists than ever before' The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has offered membership to 322 individuals "who have distinguished themselves by their contributions to theatrical motion pictures." According to the Academy's press release, "those who accept the invitations will be the only additions to the Academy's membership in 2015." In case all 322 potential new members say an enthusiastic Yes, that means an injection of new blood representing about 5 percent of the Academy's current membership. In the words of Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs (as quoted in the press release), in 2015 "our branches have recognized a more diverse and inclusive list of filmmakers and artists than ever before, and we look forward to adding their creativity, ideas and experience to our organization." In recent years, the Academy membership has
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Oscar News: 322 Invited To Join; The Academy Museum Receives Approval

©Renzo Piano Building Workshop/©Studio Pali Fekete architects/©A.M.P.A.S.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced this week that the Los Angeles City Council, in a unanimous vote, approved plans for the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Construction will begin this summer, and ceremonial groundbreaking festivities will occur this fall.

“I am thrilled that Los Angeles is gaining another architectural and cultural icon,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “My office of economic development has worked directly with the museum’s development team to ensure that the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures will create jobs, support tourism, and pay homage to the industry that helped define our identity as the creative capital of the world.”

“We are grateful to our incredible community of supporters who have helped make this museum a reality,” said Dawn Hudson, the Academy’s CEO. “Building this museum has been an Academy
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Benedict Cumberbatch, Kevin Hart, Emma Stone and 319 others invited to vote for Oscar

  • Hitfix
Benedict Cumberbatch, Kevin Hart, Emma Stone and 319 others invited to vote for Oscar
Strangely dropping a press release on a historic day where the nation's attention is elsewhere, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences revealed their annual list of new member invitees this morning. For those who criticize the makeup of the Academy there was some good news and the stark realization the organization still has a long way to go. The Academy has spent the last eight to 10 years attempting to diversify its membership and this year's class mostly reflects that. There are significantly more invitees of Asian and African-American descent, but the male to female disparity is still depressing. Out of the 25 potential new members of the Actor's Branch only seven are women. And, no, there isn't really an acceptable way for the Academy to spin that sad fact. Additionally, It's important to realize the 322 people noted in the release have only been invited to join Hollywood's most exclusive club.
See full article at Hitfix »

Academy Invites Record 322 New Members in Push for More Oscar Diversity

Academy Invites Record 322 New Members in Push for More Oscar Diversity
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences continues to push for diversity, sending membership invitations to 322 individuals, including a healthy number of people who can help change the org’s demos.

Among the invitees are David Oyelowo, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Felicity Jones, Emma Stone, Rosamund Pike, Bong Joon-ho, Justin Lin and Francois Ozon. The Academy has been reaching out to women, foreign-born artists and people of various races, ethnic backgrounds and ages.

Accusations of Academy bigotry surfaced yet again in January when the list of Oscar nominees included Caucasians in all 20 acting categories, and few women or racial minorities among the other categories. Director Ava DuVernay and actor David Oyelowo of “Selma” had seemed like strong contenders, giving many people hopes of breakthroughs. After initial anger at the Acad, activists began to shift their protests to industry hiring practices. For example, 323 films were eligible for 2014 awards — which means AMPAS should theoretically
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The First Trailer Is Here For Zac Efron’s We Are Your Friends

From writer/director Max Joseph, here’s a first look at the trailer for We Are Your Friends starring Zac Efron, Emily Ratajkowski and Wes Bentley.

The film marks Max Joseph’s (MTV’s “Catfish: The TV Show”) feature film directorial debut.

We Are Your Friends is about what it takes to find your voice. Set in the world of electronic music and Hollywood nightlife, an aspiring 23-year-old DJ named Cole (Efron) spends his days scheming with his childhood friends and his nights working on the one track that will set the world on fire. All of this changes when he meets a charismatic but damaged older DJ named James (Bentley), who takes him under his wing. Things get complicated, however, when Cole starts falling for James’ much younger girlfriend, Sophie (Ratajkowski). With Cole’s forbidden relationship intensifying and his friendships unraveling, he must choose between love, loyalty, and the future he is destined for.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Miranda July Will Debut New Work at San Francisco Film Fest

Miranda July Will Debut New Work at San Francisco Film Fest
Miranda July sadly hasn't directed a feature since 2011's "The Future." But the talented multi-hyphenate will launch her latest interactive performance piece in a special two-night run during the San Francisco International Film Festival. This theater experiment first premiered on the east coast last year. "New Society," set to premiere April 28 at the Brava Theater Center, investigates how groups form, change and disintegrate and will, according to the San Francisco Film Society, test the limits of what is possible in two hours with a roomful of strangers. July won Sfiff's New Director prize for her 2005 Sundance debut "Me and You and Everyone We Know," a creepy, beautiful and button-smashing comedy that also entwined strangers of disparate ages in uncomfortable scenarios. In her just-published first novel "The First Bad Man" and tender 2005 short story collection "No One Belongs Here More Than You," July observes similar themes of...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Cinereach Welcomes Caroline Kaplan as Head of Creative Initiatives

Caroline Kaplan has joined the Cinereach staff as the Head of Creative Initiatives. A well-known figure throughout the indie film community, Kaplan was a key architect of IFC Productions ("Monsoon Wedding," "Me and You and Everyone We Know") as well as the digital company InDigEnt ("Tadpole," "Pieces of April"). Her work as a producer has spanned Errol Morris' "Mr. Death" to the upcoming Richard Gere-starring "Time Out of Mind." In her new role, Kaplan will oversee filmmaker support and strategic partnerships. "Each film we support faces unique creative and financial challenges," said Cinereach Founder and Executive Director Philipp Engelhorn. "Our approach is to tailor our support to those challenges and Caroline's experience and perspective will greatly expand what we can offer in terms of resources for filmmakers. She will also be a major influence on how Cinereach responds to the evolving independent film...
See full article at Indiewire »
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