Needs 5 Ratings

The Language of Kickball (1999)

"Sometimes I'm only pretending to listen." "Sometimes I'm only pretending to talk!" The verbal volleys go back and forth in actor/filmmaker Michael Barron's feature debut, a ... See full summary »

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Credited cast:
Michael Barron ...
Fitz
Chris Gerson ...
Austin
...
Taylor (as Amanda Gaspar)
Paul Soychak ...
Emma Vogel ...
Emma
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Storyline

"Sometimes I'm only pretending to listen." "Sometimes I'm only pretending to talk!" The verbal volleys go back and forth in actor/filmmaker Michael Barron's feature debut, a made-in-Cleveland comedy that plays as though Samuel Beckett, Tom Stoppard, Whit Stillman got tossed into the same burning Cuyahoga River together and clung to a Drew Carey-shaped flotation device for safety. Barron plays Fitz, a young man facing the world (i.e. dreary jobs at places like Burger Bazaar) armed with a worthless creative writing degree, a car composed mostly of rust, and arcane philosophies nurtured along by his slacker housemate Austin, ten years a lazy mall janitor and proud of it. Austin is able to pull some strings with upper management and gets Fitz in a position - wearing a urine-stained bunny costume at an Easter display. Just when it looks like things can't get any worse for the hero, a guy calling himself the devil offers to buy his soul, adding that Fitz should sell now, while it's still ... Written by Michael Barron

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Comedy

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23 March 1999 (USA)  »

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$5,000 (estimated)
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Why aren't there more movies like this?
27 January 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Shot on a shoestring, maybe, but captures the existential angst of Gen-Xrs with wry wit, sentimentality, occasional belly laughs and a hint of poetry.

Despite the shoestring, the film looks a lot better than a lot of grainy video-looking cliché crap that enjoys wider distribution. Why this film is unavailable is unknown to me - it appeared to have died after a brief festival run. It's part of a small batch of indie films that were made in that brief slip of time after it became rock-star cool to be an indie filmmaker and before digital video burst out of its shell that never made it past the festivals, and that exemplify personal expression. If you can find it take a look.

If you like this film check out The Pigeon Egg Strategy


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