Brownell, a wealthy young man, marries a beautiful girl. Miss Jennings, a dashing artist who loved Brownell, is moved to bitter jealousy. Mrs. Brownell secretly arranges to have her ... See full summary »
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Brownell
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Mrs. Brownell
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Brownell, a wealthy young man, marries a beautiful girl. Miss Jennings, a dashing artist who loved Brownell, is moved to bitter jealousy. Mrs. Brownell secretly arranges to have her portrait painted intending to present it to her husband as a birthday gift. While she is posing Miss Jennings tells Brownell his wife is carrying on a clandestine love affair with Jackson the artist and that she is at that moment in his studio. Brownell goes to the studio, but Miss Jennings has preceded him and stolen the canvas. When Brownell finds his wife the explanation of her presence there is made ridiculous by the loss of the portrait. Brownell refuses to believe it, and sues for a divorce. A pathetic courtroom scene is shown as the husband is granted a decree. The broken-hearted wife seeks refuge in a monastery. Some time later Miss Jennings has a gathering of artists in her apartments, and one of the girls rummaging about finds the stolen portrait and shows it to Jackson. A dramatic situation ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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7 January 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The story is not up to the standard of most former Reliance releases
26 October 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A case of jealousy, based upon the supposed perfidy of a wife. A jealous woman steals the portrait an artist is painting of her, after informing the husband that she is in the artist's studio. Divorce proceedings, ending in legal separation, and the retirement of the unfortunate woman, in a convent follow. Some time after the portrait is found, which clears up the mystery. Hurrying to the convent, the husband seeks to induce the woman to return. At first refusing, a kindly monk intercedes, and joining their hands, marries them over. While the acting in this is quite as good as the piece permits, the story is not up to the standard of most former Reliance releases. It must be admitted that most husbands, when their wives protested their innocence, would have listened. It does not seem natural that a real man would go to such lengths without further investigation; and in this direction, at least, there is distortion. Such haste is seldom noted in real life, and it mars a picture. The court-room scene is pathetic. In truth, it is extremely realistic. The excellent acting in the Reliance films makes such inconsistencies, as mentioned, more prominent than they would be with indifferent acting. - The Moving Picture World, January 21, 1911


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