Jackson's arrival at Nashville, astride a horse, marks the first incident recorded in this series of cinematographic views, illustrating historical occurrences in the life of Jackson from ... See full summary »

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Jackson's arrival at Nashville, astride a horse, marks the first incident recorded in this series of cinematographic views, illustrating historical occurrences in the life of Jackson from this time until General Packenham surrendered at New Orleans. He took up lodgings at a boarding house of a Mrs. Robarts, who subsequently secured a divorce from her drunken husband and married Jackson. The details of this divorce caused an encounter with one Charles Dickinson, a man enjoying a most enviable reputation as a dead shot. Dickinson, by way of challenge, told Jackson that on the morning following a verbal encounter he would shoot him through the heart, by hitting the button on his coat. Knowing the unfailing aim of his antagonist, Jackson sewed the button a trifle higher, which precaution saved his life. In May, of 1814, he was commissioned as Major General of militia for the District of Cumberland. Jean Lafite, a noted brigand and pirate, offered his services to Jackson, provided he were ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama | History

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3 February 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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It represents a series of detached incidents
16 July 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A two-reel historical offering which will perhaps best be appreciated by those familiar with the life of Andrew Jackson. To the ordinary observer it represents a series of detached incidents, each interesting in itself, but lacking the element of suspense or story interest. The characterizations are good. The duel scene, in which Jackson changed the position of a button on his coat, and by so doing saved his life, was interesting. The second reel has considerable action, leading up to the surrender of General Packenham at New Orleans. The manner in which Jean LaFitte tendered the services of his band to Jackson was nicely shown. - The Moving Picture World, February 15, 1913


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