7.3/10
18,180
121 user 119 critic

Breakfast on Pluto (2005)

In the 1970s, a young trans woman, Patrick "Kitten" Braden, comes of age by leaving her Irish town for London, in part to look for her mother and in part because her gender identity is beyond the town's understanding.

Director:

Writers:

, (as Patrick McCabe) | 1 more credit »

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 6 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Morgan Jones ...
Building Site Worker
...
...
Father Liam
Mary Coughlan ...
Housekeeper
Conor McEvoy ...
Ruth McCabe ...
...
Seamus Reilly ...
Peter Owens ...
Butcher
Emmet Lawlor McHugh ...
Bianca O'Connor ...
Paraic Breathnach ...
Pat McCabe ...
Peepers Egan / Schoolmaster (as Patrick McCabe)
...
Edit

Storyline

A young transwoman, Patrick "Kitten" Braden, comes of age in the 1970s. She leaves her Irish town, in part to look for her mother and in part because her transgender nature is beyond the town's understanding. She's taken in by a rock band, falls for the lead singer, has brushes with the IRA, is arrested by the London police, works in a peep show, and poses as a survey researcher for the phone company. Throughout, her nationality and her nature put her at great risk. In her search for her mother, she makes surprising discoveries of friendship and family. But, will she survive? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Same world, different planet!

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexuality, language, some violence and drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

|

Language:

|

Release Date:

6 January 2006 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Desayuno en Plutón  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$33,279 (USA) (18 November 2005)

Gross:

$828,699 (USA) (24 March 2006)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The title of the film and the novel it's based on is taken from the song "Breakfast on Pluto" by Don Partridge. The song is used as part of the soundtrack and Liam Cunningham quotes a few lines (including the title) from the lyrics. See more »

Goofs

The colour of the foil tops on the milk bottles changes colour between shots. They are silver when they're outside on the doorsteps with the robins picking at them and when the housekeeper picks them up to bring them in. When she puts them on the breakfast table inside in the next shot, they are golden. See more »

Quotes

1st Biker: When I ride my hog, you think I'm riding the road? No way, man. I'm travelling from the past into the future with a druid at my back.
Patrick "Kitten" Braden: Druid man or druid woman?
1st Biker: That doesn't matter. What matters is the journey. You know where it goes, baby?
Patrick "Kitten" Braden: Where?
1st Biker: We'll visit the stars and journey to Mars, finding our breakfast... on Pluto.
See more »

Crazy Credits

With thanks to the people of Callan Co., Kilkenny See more »

Connections

References Paris, Texas (1984) See more »

Soundtracks

Fly Robin Fly
(1975)
Music by Sylvester Levay
Lyrics by Stephan Prager
Performed by Silver Convention
© Edition Butterfly Musikverlag GmbH/Edition Meridian Ralph Siegel KG/Chappell & Co. GmbH
By kind permission of Warner/Chappell Music Limited
Courtesy of Magnet Records Limited
By Arrangement with Warner Strategic Marketing UK.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A brilliant film
18 November 2005 | by (St. Louis, Missouri) – See all my reviews

I lived in London in 1973, the year that the main character in the film arrives in London from Ireland.

Breakfast On Pluto caught the tone of London in 1973 so well that it was like re-living the past. A past when friendships were mighty and strong; a past when London was a sexually liberated city; a past when people were so wrapped up in television that the London park system had to hire people to dress up like the television creatures called wombles.

But more than bringing 1973 back to life for me, this film showed me an amazingly resilient Irishman named Kitten. To the people who think that a 135-minute film is way too long, I would tell them to go see Breakfast On Pluto, because those 135 minutes just fly by. And they are 135 minutes of great acting, across the board.


104 of 133 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?