88 Minutes (2007) - News Poster

(2007)

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Love Guru Leads Razzie Awards

  • WENN
Love Guru Leads Razzie Awards
Mike Myers' comedy The Love Guru is leading this year's Golden Raspberry Awards after scoring seven nominations at the naming and shaming of the year's worst movies.

Funnyman Myers is nominated in the Worst Actor category, and his castmates Sir Ben Kingsley and Verne Troyer also received Worst Supporting Actor nods for their performances in the comedy, about a spiritual healer.

Other actors up for the Worst Actor dishonour include Mark Wahlberg (The Happening and Max Payne) and Al Pacino, who garnered nods for both 88 Minutes and Righteous Kill.

The Love Guru is also up for the Worst Picture Award, competing with M Night Shyamalan's ecological thriller The Happening, Paris Hilton's farce The Hottie and the Nottie, Disaster Movie, Meet the Spartans and In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale.

The hotel heiress gets three nods for her turn in the comedy picture, as well as another Worst Actress nomination for Repo! The Genetic Opera.

Hilton will compete for that gong against Jessica Alba (The Love Guru and The Eye), the stars of The Women (Annette Bening, Eva Mendes, Debra Messing, Jada Pinkett-Smith and Meg Ryan), What Happened In Vegas' Cameron Diaz and Kate Hudson for both Fool's Gold and My Best Friend.s Girl.

The winners will be announced at a ceremony in Hollywood on 21 February - a day before the Academy Awards take place.

'Baby Mama' legit at the boxoffice

'Baby Mama' legit at the boxoffice
Baby Mama delivered a No. 1 opening for Universal this weekend, bouncing into the domestic boxoffice with an estimated $18.3 million.

That bested the $14.6 million bow by New Line/Warner Bros.' runner-up Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay. Fox's Ewan McGregor starrer Deception debuted in 10th place with just $2.2 million.

The previous frame's No. 1 film, The Forbidden Kingdom -- from Lionsgate, the Weinstein Co., Casey Silver Prods. and Relativity Media -- slipped 48% to ring up $11.2 million in third place with a $38.3 million cume. Universal's R-rated comedy Forgetting Sarah Marshall was still on the minds of enough moviegoers to register $11 million in fourth place, as a modest weekend-over-weekend drop of 38% shaped a 10-day cume of $35.1 million.

Sony's Al Pacino starrer 88 Minutes fell 48% in its second session to $3.6 million in eighth place with a $12.6 million cume. Meanwhile, Rocky Mountain's documentary "Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed" tumbled from the top 10 on a 54% decline in sophomore grosses to $1.4 million, with a $5.3 million cume.

Industrywide, the final weekend of the spring boxoffice notched a second consecutive three-day uptick, as $91 million in collective grosses marked a 17% improvement over the same frame last year, according to Nielsen EDI.

Yet overall, seasonal tallies have declined 18% from spring 2007, at $830 million. And 2008's $2.55 billion in year-to-date grosses represents a 2% dip from tallies over the same portion of last year.

In a limited bow this weekend, MGM's Burt Reynolds starrer Deal grossed $31,000 from 51 playdates. That was just $620 per engagement, boding a quick detour to DVD.

Newstyle Releasing's family adventure film A Plumm Summer debuted in 58 theaters in four markets and rung up $60,668, or a thin $1,046 per venue.

'Forbidden Kingdom' rules boxoffice

'Forbidden Kingdom' rules boxoffice
The Forbidden Kingdom, from Lionsgate and the Weinstein Co., traveled to the top of the domestic boxoffice during the weekend, bowing with an estimated $20.9 million.

Universal's R-rated comedy Forgetting Sarah Marshall grabbed the frame's silver medal with a memorable $17.3 million in opening grosses. Sony Screen Gems' horror film Prom Night saw a 56% drop over its sophomore session but still finished third with $9.1 million, good for a $32.6 million cume.

Sony's Al Pacino thriller 88 Minutes debuted in fourth place with $6.8 million. Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed, a Ben Stein-narrated documentary about critics of the intelligent-design theory of creation, bowed in ninth place with $3.2 million from 1,052 playdates.

Among other holdovers, the cop drama Street Kings from Fox Searchlight and Regency fell 68% from its opening grosses to ring up $4 million in sixth place and produce a $19.9 million cume. The Miramax drama Smart People tumbled from the top 10 on a 61% decline in its second weekend to $1.6 million, with a $6.8 million cume.

Industrywide, the weekend's $92 million in collective grosses marked a 4% increase from the same frame a year go, according to Nielsen EDI data. That represents only the second year-over-year weekend uptick in the past 10 sessions. Year-to-date, 2008 trails the same portion of last year by 3%, at $2.43 billion, Nielsen said.

In a limited bow for the weekend, the Weinstein Co.'s documentary "Where in the World Is Osama bin Laden?" grossed $143,299 from 102 theaters, or $1,405 per venue.

88 Minutes

88 Minutes
Time is of the essence for Al Pacino's Dr. Jack Gramm, a forensic scientist who receives a threatening call on his cell phone informing him he's got all of 88 minutes to live.

But a scant hour-and-a-half can seem like a hellish eternity when you've got a nonsensical, exposition-heavy script (by Gary Scott Thompson) and stagy directing (by Jon Avnet) to work with, not to mention an official running time that actually exceeds the American-German co-production's real-time gimmick by almost 20 minutes.

Spending a good portion of the past two years being knocked around TriStar's release schedule, this ridiculous thriller would be hard-pressed to last much longer than its title in theaters before doing time on DVD, as is already the case in many overseas territories.

When two copycat killings take place within hours of the scheduled execution of Jon Forster (Neal McDonough), who was found guilty of being the serial killer known as the The Seattle Strangler, the media is beginning to wonder if Gramm's nine-year-old testimony convicted the right guy.

While Gramm is convinced the grisly killings are the work of a copycat killer, he finds himself with more pressing problems when he receives a personal, time-sensitive death threat from somebody who would appear to be operating within his own circle of colleagues.

As the body count continues to hit ever closer to home, Gramm is required to cut through the mounting paranoia and whittle down the list of potential suspects before it's too late.

It will actually take a lot less than 88 minutes for most audience members to figure out whodunit thanks to some clunky execution that effectively tips the culprit's identity within the first half-hour.

The old built-in ticking clock is a trick that can work successfully on a show like "24" or, to a lesser extent, in a film like John Badham's 1995 thriller, Nick of Time, but it requires expert calibration from both the writing and direction to pull it off.

A quickening of pace would also be a prerequisite, but in the case of 88 Minutes the accompanying action is more of the head-scratching than the pulse-pounding variety.

While Avnet is a filmmaker with a proven strength for character-driven literary drama like Fried Green Tomatoes, he seems out of his element here, especially the one provided by Gary Scott Thompson's ragingly artificial copycat of a copycat killer picture.

Pacino, sporting a wild hairdo and facial hair that seemingly channels the late Wolfman Jack, counts on his old bag of tricks to pump some credibility into his character, but this time they only take him so far.

Also squandered is a talented supporting cast including Alicia Witt, Amy Brenneman and Leelee Sobieski, among the list of possible suspects, who have all, apparently been instructed to overplay their roles on the potentially guilty side.

With something like eight executive producers on board, it's not surprising that the prevailing visual style would be best described as quick and dirty, with a barely-disguised Vancouver subbing for Seattle.

88 MINUTES

TriStar Pictures

A TriStar Pictures and Millennium Films presentation of a Randall Emmett/George Furla production for Equity Pictures Medienfonds GmbH & KG III and Nu Image Entertainment GmbH.

Credits:

Director: Jon Avnet

Writer: Gary Scott Thompson

Producers: Jon Avnet, Randall Emmett, Gary Scott Thompson, Avi Lerner

Executive producers: Danny Dimbort, Trevor Short, Boaz Davidson, George Furla, Andreas Thiesmeyer, Josef Lautenschlager, Lawrence Bender, John Baldecchi

Director of photography: Denis Lenoir

Production designer: Tracey Gallacher

Music: Edward Shearmur

Co-producers: Michael Flannigan, John Thompson, Samuel Hadida, Marsha Oglesby, Jochen Kamlah, Gerd Koechlin, Manfred Heid

Costume designer: Mary McLeod

Editor: Peter Berger

Cast:

Jack Gramm: Al Pacino

Kim Cummings: Alicia Witt

Lauren Douglas: Leelee Sobieski

Shelly Barnes: Amy Brenneman

Carol Lynn Johnson: Deborah Kara Unger

Benjamin McKenzie: Mike Stempt

Jon Forster: Neal McDonough

Running time -- 106 minutes

MPAA rating: R

McKenzie given '88 Minutes'

McKenzie given '88 Minutes'
Benjamin McKenzie, one of the stars of The O.C., will play opposite Al Pacino in Jon Avnet's 88 Minutes. The movie, now shooting in Vancouver, focuses on a college professor (Pacino) who moonlights as a forensic psychiatrist for the FBI who receives a death threat claiming he only has 88 minutes to live. McKenzie is playing one of Pacino's grad students and a possible suspect in the professor's investigation.

Trio clocks in to Avnet's '88 Minutes'

Trio clocks in to Avnet's '88 Minutes'
Alicia Witt, Leelee Sobieski and Neal McDonough have signed on to star opposite Al Pacino in Jon Avnet's crime drama 88 Minutes, which begins principal photography Saturday in Vancouver. Witt will play a teaching assistant and the romantic interest to Pacino's character, a college professor who moonlights as an FBI forensic psychologist. Sobieski will play one of Pacino's students, and McDonough will play a death row inmate whom Pacino's character suspects is orchestrating his murder, which he has been told will occur in 88 minutes. Gary Scott Thompson penned the screenplay.

Trio clocks in to Avnet's '88 Minutes'

Trio clocks in to Avnet's '88 Minutes'
Alicia Witt, Leelee Sobieski and Neal McDonough have signed on to star opposite Al Pacino in Jon Avnet's crime drama 88 Minutes, which begins principal photography Saturday in Vancouver. Witt will play a teaching assistant and the romantic interest to Pacino's character, a college professor who moonlights as an FBI forensic psychologist. Sobieski will play one of Pacino's students, and McDonough will play a death row inmate whom Pacino's character suspects is orchestrating his murder, which he has been told will occur in 88 minutes. Gary Scott Thompson penned the screenplay.

'Sister' act: Hill to helm thriller

'Sister' act: Hill to helm thriller
Walter Hill has signed on to direct the cop thriller Little Sister for Avi Lerner's Millennium Films. Hill will direct from a script he co-wrote with his production partner and longtime collaborator David Giler. The story centers on a female cop who teams up with a Mafia-type thug seeking retribution for his little sister's death. Along with Hill and Giler, Millennium's Lerner, Danny Dimbort and Boaz Davidson will be involved as producers/executive producers, though the exact details have yet to be finalized. Millennium teamed with Hill on Undisputed, which Miramax released in 2002. Hill and Giler also co-wrote Undisputed. Millennium is involved in several high-profile projects. Earlier this month, Millennium and Emmett/Furla teamed to finance and produce the thriller 88 Minutes, starring Al Pacino. Other Millennium projects include Edison, starring Justin Timberlake, Kevin Spacey and Morgan Freeman, and Mozart & the Whale, starring Josh Hartnett and Radha Mitchell. Hill's directing credits include 48 Hrs., Southern Comfort, Red Heat and Deadwood. Hill and Giler are repped by ICM.

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