A team of comedic improvisers (mostly "Whose Line" alums) headed by Drew Carey perform on a green screen set, and their antics are now fleshed out with amusing animation.
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2004   Unknown  

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Storyline

A team of comedic improvisers (mostly "Whose Line" alums) headed by Drew Carey perform on a green screen set, and their antics are now fleshed out with amusing animation.

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Comedy

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7 October 2004 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Drew Carey's Green Screen Show  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

A taping with Ryan Stiles was recorded but, as of November 2005, it remains unaired. See more »

Quotes

Colin Mochrie: [playing New Choice "How to Box"] Endurance is very important.
Jeff Bryan Davis: New choice.
Colin Mochrie: Running away from your opponent is very important. That's why I train with a skipping rope.
Jeff Bryan Davis: New choice.
Colin Mochrie: That's why I use a unicycle.
Jeff Bryan Davis: New choice.
Colin Mochrie: That's why... I... stand and think about what great shape I'm in...
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Connections

Spun-off from Whose Line Is It Anyway? (1998) See more »

Soundtracks

La Trampa
(Theme song)
Performed by Tonino Carotone and Manu Chao
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User Reviews

Nice idea, but I didn't laugh out loud once.
4 December 2005 | by (Hampshire, England) – See all my reviews

The use of the technology on the Green Screen Show is very clever but looks like a lot of hard work. As others have written though, the concept of drawing in details later definitely clashes with the whole premise of improv. This is two halves that don't come together.

Firstly, the improv: the performers are doing their thing ad-hoc, and they're funny. They have a live audience that laughs at their jokes.

Secondly, you have brilliant animation. This would be great in its own right, but it has no live audience (which is fine for animation, ordinarily, but here it doesn't work).

The reason this combination feels so odd is that you can't shake the knowledge that the studio audience are only seeing the improv, and only laughing at the improv, whereas we (the home audience) get to see the added detail and jokes - which have no audience laughing at them. The result is the same uncomfortable feeling you get when you realise that a sitcom has a laughter track (canned laughter).

Great effort, but the format (Whose Line is it Anyway) wasn't broke, so why try to fix it?


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