6.4/10
197
4 user 1 critic

La petite Chartreuse (2005)

Eight-year-old Eva and her mother have a very positive CHILD-TO-CHILD-RELATION. The mother is incapable of mature behaviour when problems arise. When the mother forgets to fetch Eva at ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(scenario), (book) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Post partum (2013)
Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

Luce and Ulysse love each other. They live a full and happy life managing their own little veterinary clinic on the Atlantic coast. Luce is awaiting a happy event. The future looks good. At... See full summary »

Director: Delphine Noels
Stars: Mélanie Doutey, Jalil Lespert, Françoise Fabian
Je l'aimais (2009)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Someone I loved (Je L'Aimais) is based on the best-selling novel by Anna Gavalda. It's the story of Pierre (Daniel Auteuil), who takes his daughter-in-law, Chloe (Florence Loiret Caille) ... See full summary »

Director: Zabou Breitman
Stars: Daniel Auteuil, Marie-Josée Croze, Florence Loiret Caille
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

In a small seaside town, two schoolgirls are assaulted by a middle-aged man in a motel. Mia, a teenager who was working on reception that night, is the only witness. For fear of losing her ... See full summary »

Director: Vivian Qu
Stars: Vicky Chen, Meijun Zhou, Bamboo Chu-Sheng Chen
Adventure | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Jacquou is a determined and attractive young man who transforms his vow of vengeance into a struggle against injustice.

Director: Laurent Boutonnat
Stars: Gaspard Ulliel, Léo Legrand, Marie-Josée Croze
Korkoro (2009)
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A Gypsy family travels the French roads during the Second World War, followed by Little Claude, a young boy seeking a new family after his parents "left and never returned". Upon reaching a... See full summary »

Director: Tony Gatlif
Stars: Marc Lavoine, Marie-Josée Croze, James Thierrée
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

The back story is a marvelous and gorgeous social commentary on the type of generous actions we could all take - to enrich our often-solitary elder-citizens' lives.

Director: Jean Becker
Stars: Albert Dupontel, Marie-Josée Croze, Pierre Vaneck
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

José is a football agent. He is in Ivory Coast to spot young talents in football . José Brussels is a braggart , who willingly sleeps with Gigi , a beautiful African woman who loves above ... See full summary »

Director: Benoît Mariage
Stars: Benoît Poelvoorde, Marc Zinga, Tatiana Rojo
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A very sad but genuinely human story. The middle-aged Icelandic woman Loa is seriously mentally ill. Finally it turns out that her husband is a latent alcoholic who submits to his addiction... See full summary »

Director: Sólveig Anspach
Stars: Élodie Bouchez, Didda Jónsdóttir, Baltasar Kormákur
Biography | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Based on the true story of two chambermaids (the Papin sisters) of 1930s France who murdered their employer and her daughter.

Director: Jean-Pierre Denis
Stars: Sylvie Testud, Julie-Marie Parmentier, Isabelle Renauld
Ararat (2002)
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Interrogated by a customs officer, a young man recounts how his life was changed during the making of a film about the Armenian genocide.

Director: Atom Egoyan
Stars: Charles Aznavour, Brent Carver, Eric Bogosian
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A family will destroy itself unless they face the most difficult choice of their life - the truth.

Director: Pilar Anguita-MacKay
Stars: Marie-Josée Croze, Julie Depardieu, Nicolas Rossier
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Etienne Vollard
...
Pascale Blanchot
Bertille Noël-Bruneau ...
Eva Blanchot
Marisa Borini ...
Anna
...
Baldi
Elisabeth Macocco ...
Consoeur, brocanteuse (as Elizabeth Macocco)
Claude Koener ...
Médecin institution
Marie-Claude Vermorel ...
Mireille
Jean-Michel Noirey ...
L'enquêteur
Lison Riess ...
Infirmière hôpital
Francine Lorin-Blazquez ...
Infirmière institution
...
Le réceptionniste
Francis Frappat ...
Le serveur de la discothèque
Philippe Chabrier ...
Serveur bowling
Rémi Thiberge ...
Guide montagne
Edit

Storyline

Eight-year-old Eva and her mother have a very positive CHILD-TO-CHILD-RELATION. The mother is incapable of mature behaviour when problems arise. When the mother forgets to fetch Eva at school in her car, Eva does not know the way home. Panicking and crying she just runs and is overrun by a car. The driver is obviously innocent. He is a second-hand bookseller (Etienne) and a mountain climber and has a phenomenal memory. The hospital cannot tell whether Eva will ever wake up from her coma, or will speak or move. But it is important that she is much spoken to while she is in coma. The bookseller takes upon himself the task the mother cannot do. He visits the child for hours every day and tells her Jack London's snow stories, which he knows by heart. Eventually Eva wakes up. She is still mute and will go only if Etienne holds her hands and actively walks her. She is bored by all kinds of child play but fascinated by the snowy mountains that can be seen from the hospital. Suddenly Eva ... Written by Max Scharnberg, Stockholm, Sweden

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

23 February 2005 (France)  »

Also Known As:

The Girl from the Chartreuse  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Capitaine abandonné
(karaoke version)
Editions Paquebot
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Am I Weakening?
11 July 2005 | by See all my reviews

I'm not sure there's a translation yet, so how available it may be to other English speakers, but I've made a point of reading Péju's "La Petite Chartreuse" before commenting the film based on it.

The read, two months and a half after seeing the film, was a bizarre experience. Despite myself, I entered the novel with expectations. I entered it anticipating its conclusion. It begins in what I think of as L'Etranger mode. Not just Camus' one, but three self-absorbed-yet-reacting-to-their-environs characters—Eva, her mother, and memory-savant Vollard—gravitate toward the accident that will irrevocably change each. This wasn't so different. Denis and his cinematographer had attempted something like it. I read on.

Pieces fell in: the mother's psychological and physical absence, her incompetence, prompting Vollard's reluctant yet ever-increasing movement toward Eva. The film's mother had been so much easier to forgive, even while blaming her. Is it harder to deny face, voice, and eyes than their more rational representation in prose? In prose as on screen, Vollard versus Eva and her ailment amounts to "mutisme contra mutisme" (p. 253, Gallimard, 2002). Other things challenged my memory. What's this 1968 strikes stuff? Who's this narrator who becomes an "I" for a single chapter, then recuses himself in favor of all too omniscient third-person? Did the film's bookshop burn? I don't think so, but… Was there bungee jumping? Maybe. As the novel closed, I grew panicky. How can what-has-to-happen happen in the eighth an inch of pages left?! In a sixteeth?!!

The answer is that Péju's prose didn't allow to happen my film-born what-has-to-happen. The filmmakers, while keeping and using nearly all Péju's dark elements, wrested from them a better feeling, even a heroic finish. Maybe it's just that I'm a smalltime climber, so felt almost as if I knew the snowy col the film's Vollard crosses at last, but as I traversed the whole novel I felt I was climbing to a sort of redemption.

The novel closes darkly against the light of the film that succeeds it. I tend to hate bogus film endings, movie endings. Why not this time, this one? Am I weakening?


9 of 18 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 4 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Paul Scheer on Why There Are No Bad Movies

Paul Scheer discusses The Disaster Artist and his love of awesomely bad movies. Plus, we dive into the origins of midnight movies and explore how The Room became a cult classic.

Watch now