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Reviews & Ratings for
Hustle & Flow More at IMDbPro »

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17 out of 34 people found the following review useful:

Black on Black Hate

1/10
Author: uptownbill (uptownbill@hotmail.com) from New York
25 July 2005

Hustle and Flow must be the favorite movie of The Klan, David Duke, and Clarence Thomas. Not since Birth of a Nation has there been a worst depiction of African American people. Every character in the movie is completely self loathing and full of misogynistic thoughts and actions. Terrance Howard plays a failure of a pimp who mistreats his prostitutes and throws one of them on the porch in the middle of the night along with her crying baby in his walker.

This movie depicts that there is no craft to making rap music and that it is the theme music of the slime of society. Every song is about drugs, violence, bitches and hoes.

He later beats up a drugged rapper and shots his way out of the situation. He goes off to jail but not before he convinces his white prostitute that she is in charge. What a movie hero.

John Singleton is the new D.W. Griffith perpetuating destructive black stereotypes. What did we do to you John? Who hurt you? Hustle and Flow should be called Black on Black hate. The hustle is the marketing to hip hop audiences; the flow is the cash flow the studio will make.

uptownbill@hotmail.com

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20 out of 40 people found the following review useful:

Best Rap Movie Ever, and Then Some!

10/10
Author: sundevil27 from Salt Lake City, UT USA
26 January 2005

I just got back from seeing this at the 2005 Sundance film festival and must say this was a fantastic movie. It should easily be the best movie to come out of the festival, and best I have had the opportunity to see there in my half dozen years of going (Its lucky to get tickets to anything these days, let alone something great). Right off I have to say the cast was absolutely amazing, several break out performances for sure,I really liked Taryn Manning (what a beauty) and Taraji P. Henson was simply emotional to watch. Then Terrence Howard, this guy has been doing some supporting roles and been rather likable, but this is totally something else, he lights the screen on fire. You could say he's the next "it" black actor, but really black,white,yellow,magenta whatever this guy drops it like its hot here, this performance will make you keep an eye out for his next movie on the IMDb. As for the story, well its about a hard livin pimp from Memphis wanting to accomplish a dream of becoming a rapper and getting his songs heard. The plot isn't that complicated which in this case is just fine because the greatness is in the details of the characters. I felt like you really became more attached to each character along the way, thus making for a much anticipated ending. The ending, I wont give it away but it is doesn't sell out and at the same time is very satisfying. If you are a fan of rap music, hip hop,crunk whatever you will very much enjoy this movie and the music is very well done. However I will also throw this out there, my 50 year old mother who thinks rap music is foul and has zero interest in gritty subject matter (ie, Pimpin) saw this movie at Sundance and thought based on the acting alone it was the best movie she had seen. Whup dat Trick!

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Change From Pimp/Hustler To DJ

10/10
Author: Intern2014 from United States
7 October 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

DJay,played by Terrence Howard, is a pimp and drug dealer who is dissatisfied with his life and wants to make a change in Hustle And Flow.After acquiring a keyboard and reacquainting himself with an old friend from school,Key, played by Anthony Anderson,who has become a sound technician. Then,he decides to try making hip hop songs. Key and sound-mixer friend,Shelby,played by DJ Qualls coordinates with DJay put together several songs.

The group experiences many setbacks throughout the creative process. DJay must hustle those around him in order to procure proper equipment and recording time, and Key's relationship with his wife becomes strained. At the end of the film, in a bit of irony, sees a duo of prison guards who have their own rap group asking DJay to listen to their demo, much as DJay had approached Skinny Black. After the guards request him to listen to the demo, he accepts their tape and responds with the following: "You know what they say, everybody gotta have a dream," which was the slogan for the film.

Hustle And Flow was a great independent drama film.Terrence Howard was exceptional as DJay.The screenplay by Craig Brewer was also great in trying to tell a story of a man who sought change in his life.His direction by was crisp as well. Highly recommended for viewers who seek themes about the welfare of disenfranchised people particularly African- Americans. Highly recommended indeed.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

"You know it's hard out here for a pimp"

8/10
Author: sme_no_densetsu from Canada
28 May 2011

"Hustle & Flow" bears some resemblance to the 2002 Eminem vehicle "8 Mile", which is a better-known, but not better, movie. Again we have an aspiring rapper, this time one chasing a dream once forgotten in order to make ends meet working as a pimp. He convinces an old friend to help him record a demo but it'll all be for nothing if they can't get their demo in the right hands.

The star of the film is Terrence Howard and he delivered an excellent performance, one that was rewarded with an Oscar nomination. I'd like to say that everyone else was as good but the rest of the cast is of variable quality. The under-appreciated Anthony Anderson contributes the best performance in support while the rest of the cast is at least passable.

Director Craig Brewer put in a workmanlike effort and the film is pretty much free of Hollywood gloss. I liked the retro opening and closing credits, too. Of course, there's lots of music and, even though I'm not much of a fan of rap, I'd have to say it was all well done, especially "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp", which (deservedly) won the Oscar for best original song.

In the end, Brewer & company unfold a compelling story with enough grit to give it an air of authenticity. Quality music and a star-making turn by Terrence Howard add to the film's appeal, resulting in a movie that's likely to surpass your expectations.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Terrence Howard's star-making performance

9/10
Author: callanvass
7 September 2010

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Hustle & Flow has the perfect balance of. Drama, Music, and performances. I firmly believe without the passionate performances, this movie wouldn't have been as strong as it was. Terrence Howard's character is a tad bit abrasive at times, but his heart of gold, and his never-give up mentality made the character perfect in my opinion. What really made the movie for me was it's realism.. The characters felt real, the situations seemed real, and the ending wasn't all that far-fetched either, and really made me smile. The ending is one of the best things about the movie because it wasn't all that unbelievable. You will hate Skinny for what he does, and it will certainly mess with your emotions. I firmly believe this movie isn't for everyone, due to its violent language and the fact that not everybody is into Rap. But it is worth it in my opinion.

Performances. Terrence Howard is Oscar worthy here. It truly was a star-making performance, and I loved everything about his character. Despite some of his abusive and abrasive actions, he remained likable. He was the heart and soul of this film. Anthony Anderson can actually ACT!. I was shocked at his maturity and how good he was here. Taryn Manning is fantastic as the vulnerable, and often overlooked woman. I felt for her on many occasions, and thought she did a great job. DJ Qualls is excellent as well surprisingly. He injected a nice amount of humor into his part. Taraji P. Henson is solid as the love interest. She was likable and never overdid it. Ludicrous played scum perfectly. I couldn't stand him as Skinny.

Bottom line. It's powerful, engrossing and a joy to watch. Don't be turned off by it, because of its subject material. Critics were 100% right about this one. A must see.

9/10

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Simply amazing & inspiring

10/10
Author: snowboarderbo from Las Vegas....baby!
24 September 2009

I've watched this movie about a dozen times now, and finally decided to give it a rating here on IMDb: 10/10.

The movie is so close to flawless, so brilliant in it's depiction of real people, so well put together that I find myself just dumbfounded every time I watch it. Like another reviewer, I find myself moved to tears by the poignancy of the struggles these people have to make something special and beautiful out of literally nothing. Life is hard for most of the people on this planet, and the continuous beatdowns take their toll, yet somehow, people find the courage, the will, to keep on keeping on and trying to create order out of the chaos. The depiction of this situation in this movie is inspiring.

The characters are the lowest of the low, stuck in horrible lives, in terrible conditions, and cognizant of it. Yet they find inspiration in their desperation, find the strength to keep struggling, even when it seems that every turn is a dead end. Like Sisyphus, they never give up, never let the boulder force them back down the mountain, and it is this indomitable characteristic in all the main players that keeps you watching, keeps you interested, keeps you caring about them and what will happen to them.

Amazing performances from all involved, great direction, great script, AWESOME music and a realistic feel that really hasn't much existed since the great films of the 1970s; this movie is one of very few that I will ever call flawless.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Story of a small time pimp with big dreams to enter the rap game

7/10
Author: vicvega1284 from Chicago, IL
29 June 2008

Hustle and Flow is a very good come-up story of a small town southern pimp slash small time drug dealer D-Jay and the people in his life who help him along the way to realize his goal of making it in the rap game. D-jay is at a mid-life crisis in his life and is looking for a way out and a way up in the rap business. Terreance Howard gives a great performance as D-Jay a very believable character, also giving a good performance is Taryn Manning as Nola, D-Jays main girl in his stable of women. Every one else in the film gives a good performance too even usually over the top character actors DJ Qualls and Anthony Anderson give more realistic performances.Good soundtrack very original. Good directing and writing by Craig Brewer. Even though this film takes place in modern day it has the feel of a 70's blaxploitation soul cinema film, a genre i am a huge fan of. I like this film the most in the recent genre of rap musician life movies that have come out around the same time i.e. Get rich or die trying and 8 Mile. I am not a huge fan of rap music but this film and it's music is very believable and it captures you're attention from the start and holds it until the end, definitely worth the viewing.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Excellent Must See!

10/10
Author: Sean Maczko from United States
19 December 2007

This movie was quite a surprise. Terrence Howard definitely made himself a name for his inspiring performance as an all around "hustler" rapper. This movie is packed with vulgar language, sexuality, and drug use, but it illustrates the hard knock life of a hustler. This is an excellent movie to watch. No kids in the room just a warning. But overall, a great movie. If you're into the hip hop lifestyle then this movie is definitely for you. If you don't like the hip hop lifestyle then maybe its not for you, but even my friend from Europe liked it. Therefore it does apply to all audiences near and far. You can pick up this movie from your local Family Video in the 2 for $1 section so go pick this movie out next time your out.

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Terrance Howard's performance spectacular/script sinks in the creek

7/10
Author: Susan from NYC
22 September 2007

Terrence Howard's performance wrenched this script from the ordinary to the extraordinary. Other members of the cast tried hard and shone well--but the script was so leaden that it was difficult for them to do as well as they should have (DJ Qualls, Taryn Manning, Taraji Henson were among those who were wonderful but who were pulled down by the script).

For me, this movie was a collection of wonderful instruments (the actors) who were desperately striving to do better than the trivial tune they were given to play. With this cast and a script that was not the cliqued, run-of-the mill job that this was, this film easily would have been a 9/10 instead of a 6/7. What a loss!

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0 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

Excellent Examination of Urban Angst & Struggle

9/10
Author: C. Sean Currie (hypestyle) from detroit, MI
18 June 2007

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

complete spoilers contained--

The film is produced by John Singleton, and written & directed by Craig Brewer. Terence Howard plays DJay, a Memphis pimp of middling means, who shares a ramshackle home with his three working girls: Lexus is the eldest, a part-time stripper whose toddler son also lives there; Nola is white and apparently DJay's main money-earner; mousy Shug is pregnant with DJay's baby. In his early 30's, DJay is having a mid-life crisis of sorts—he's weary of spending his days pushing sex and nickel-bags of marijuana, but he doesn't know exactly what else he wants to do.

A chance barter gets DJay a Reagan-era Casio keyboard, and he takes it as an omen to try and become a rap singer. Arnel (Isaac Hayes) is a sympathetic bar owner, who tells DJay that a Memphis local, Skinny Black (Ludacris) has recently become a mainstream rap star, and he's poised to have a 4th of July party in town. DJay swears he used to know the guy, and now he plans to record a demo tape to pass along to Black in time for the party.

Soon, DJay rekindles a friendship with an old high school chum Key (Anthony Anderson)—now married, Key's an audio engineer recording depositions at the city courthouse, and he becomes DJay's producer. They jerry-rig a recording studio in DJay's house, and along with vending machine-stocker/church organist Shelby (DJ Qualls) they set about to creating DJay's sound.

All the actors do a good job; Howard is very convincing as DJay; despite his role in his relationship with his hookers, he's just as lost and desperate as they are. The film doesn't glorify the pimp lifestyle but instead offers a glimpse at the reality that probably exists for most people involved: DJay doesn't drive a new model Cadillac, but a beat-up early-80's sedan; he's dressed not in flamboyant suits, but casual gear. The casual brutality of that world is glimpsed when DJay kicks Lexus and her son out of the house, and when he prompts Nola to do a sex job in exchange for an expensive microphone.

--Climax Spoilers-- DJay's ambitions increases the pressure not only on himself, but everyone around him—Lexus is constantly surly and snarly; Nola is increasingly antsy about turning tricks; Key's church-going wife is aghast at his newfound choice of friends. Eventually, DJay's group finish a song, "Whoop That Trick"—on cassette—and DJay prepares to approach Skinny Black at Arnel's bar. It isn't easy—Black is surrounded by a posse of boorish hangers-on, and it takes DJay offering Black a batch of high-end marijuana to break the ice.

Unfortunately, Black turns out to be a drunken jerk, who ditches the demo tape in the restroom; when DJay finds it he beats him up, but then one of Black's henchman shows up, and a firefight gets started—DJay ends up doing some time. Key visits him, and lets him know what's been going on since then: Shug gave birth to a baby girl, and its clear that she's still holding a torch for DJay; Nola turned into DJay's defacto manager, shopping his song to assorted radio stations; as he's about to be released, his song finally hits the radio; even some correctional officers offer him their demo tape. "Everybody's gotta have a dream."

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