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Nobody Knows (2004)
"Dare mo shiranai" (original title)

8.1
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Ratings: 8.1/10 from 15,389 users   Metascore: 88/100
Reviews: 93 user | 128 critic | 31 from Metacritic.com

In a small Tokyo apartment, twelve-year-old Akira must care for his younger siblings after their mother leaves them and shows no sign of returning.

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Cast

Credited cast:
Yûya Yagira ...
Ayu Kitaura ...
Kyoko
Hiei Kimura ...
Shigeru
Momoko Shimizu ...
Hanae Kan ...
Saki
You ...
Keiko, the mother
Kazuyoshi Kushida ...
Yoshinaga, The Landlord
Yukiko Okamoto ...
Eriko Yoshinaga
Sei Hiraizumi ...
Mini-market Manager
...
Mini-market Employee
Takako Tate ...
Mini-market teller
Yûichi Kimura ...
Sugihara (Taxi Driver)
Ken'ichi Endô ...
Susumu Terajima ...
Baseball coach
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Shinichi Hashizawa
Edit

Storyline

In Tokyo, the reckless single mother Keiko moves to a small apartment with her twelve years old son Akira Fukushima and hidden in the luggage, his siblings Shigeru and Yuki. Kyoko, another sibling arrives later by train. The children have different fathers and do not have schooling, but they have a happy life with their mother. When Keiko finds a new boyfriend, she leaves the children alone, giving some money to Akira and assigning him to take care of his siblings. When the money finishes, Akira manages to find means to survive with the youngsters without power supply, gas or water at home, and with the landlord asking for the rental. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil who never watched the movie based on his comments about 3 children in luggage when there were only two.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for mature thematic elements and some sexual references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

21 October 2004 (Hong Kong)  »

Also Known As:

Nobody Knows  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$32,393 (USA) (4 February 2005)

Gross:

$683,575 (USA) (24 June 2005)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Buenos Aires Festival Internacional de Cine Independiente)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See  »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Filmed chronologically over almost an entire year. See more »

Goofs

When Akira buys the stack of chocolates for Yuki near the end of the movie, he buys 19 boxes and the total comes to 1,895 yen. As there was no sales tax at the time Japan, each box would have to be priced at 99.74 yen - which is essentially impossible. See more »

Quotes

Pachinko Parlor Employee: Shit. I'm 10 yen short. Lend me 10 yen.
Akira Fukushima: Ten yen?
Pachinko Parlor Employee: No big deal, huh? Lend me. What the hell is with that big wallet? What the hell is this?
Akira Fukushima: It's a hand-me-down from Mom.
Pachinko Parlor Employee: From who?
Akira Fukushima: From Mom.
Pachinko Parlor Employee: You moved, right? Roomy, huh? Any pubic hair comin', yet?
Akira Fukushima: No...
Pachinko Parlor Employee: Bullshit. I got mine in fifth grade.
Akira Fukushima: No way.
[...]
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Love Songs (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

Houseki
Sung by Takako Tate
See more »

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User Reviews

A compelling portrait of the world of abandoned children
6 March 2005 | by (Berkeley, California) – See all my reviews

"Nobody Knows" is painful to watch. It's a story you won't shake off, depicting the most defenseless of humans -- four young children, the oldest only twelve -- trapped in growing poverty and abandonment. It's a process-narrative of devolution that makes you feel helpless and angry and sad. It's saved from mawkishness by the natural energy of the children playing the roles of the four kids. And if it survives, its not because of its treatment of a social issue so much as for its evocation of the precise details of childhood.

There are two main subjects here. One is criminal neglect: the story is loosely based on events that happened in Tokyo in 1988. The other is the private, often secret, lives of children. Koreeda began as a documentary filmmaker and this seems to have given him exceptional skill in working with people and capturing their natural reactions. The winning, tragic children in "Nobody Knows," four half-siblings with different fathers and the same childish, selfish mother, never seem to be acting and often no doubt aren't. Nonetheless the subtlety of expression in the delicate, mobile, beautiful face of the older boy, young Yûya Yagira, was such that it won him the Best Actor award at Cannes last year.

Also important is Koreeda's gift for detail, his meditative examinations of fingernails, feet, a toy piano, video games, pieces of paper, objects strewn around a room, the hundreds of little soft drink bottles that are everywhere in Japan, plants, dirt, all the small things children see because they're closer to the ground. And the things they accept because they're defenseless and innocent, but also incredibly adaptable.

Akira, who's only ten and whose voice changed during year spent making the movie, is in charge. As their mother's absences become lengthier and the children finally seem to be abandoned for good, money runs out. Akira is captain of a sinking ship, a somber duty, but he and his little sisters and brother keep finding time to laugh and play.

Koreeda's a passionately serious filmmaker: the two better known of his earlier fiction films deal with death and loss and here he considers as a given the worst of human carelessness and indifference both by society and the individual. "Maborosi" (1995) was a homage to Ozu but without Ozu's sense of social connectedness; it begins with an isolated couple in the city and chronicles a young widow's second marriage in the country through a slow pastiche of observed daily scenes where event and even dialogue are minimal concerns. The content of "Maborosi" is too thin, but the images and color are exquisite and the sequences of natural, unrehearsed-looking scenes achieve an impressively rich, beautiful, zen-like calm. "After Life" (1998) uses actual recollections of older people talking to the camera to build up a fantasy about dead souls held temporarily in a bureaucratic pre-Heaven limbo being asked to choose a single favorite memory to take with them into eternity: the effect is perplexing, thought-provoking, charming, and with great economy of means, cinematic.

"Nobody Knows" isn't as brilliant or resolved as "After Life" or as exquisitely visual as "Maborosi," but for all its rambling excessive length it delivers a quantity of undigested patient misery and joy that will evoke such noble antecedents from the classic world of cinematic humanism as Clément's "Forbidden Games," De Sica's "Bicycle Thief," and the homeless father and son living on garbage in Kurosawa's Do-des-ka-den.

What's new here though is a sense of the encompassing otherness of big modern cities and the stoicism and resiliency of childhood (and perhaps also of the Japanese personality). Keiko, the childish, weak, spoiled mother (played effectively -- we instantly hate her -- by You, who's some sort of pop star in Japan), sneaks three of her four children into the new apartment and tells them they can't go out, can't show themselves even on the balcony. (In the real event, this was largely because they were illegitimate and had no papers, but here the explanation is that their noise may get them evicted.) Only Akira can leave, and she won't let him or the others go to school. They're prisoners of their urban anonymity and of an impersonal contemporary society.

As in Andrew Berkin's "Cement Garden," the children also pretend everything's okay to escape the cruelty of the social welfare system. We watch agonizingly -- and many writers say the movie's somewhat too long; it does feel thus especially during the first hour -- but this time Koreeda's world is more direct and specific than before and there's plenty of talk. The children chatter among themselves. Eventually they go out and mix a bit by day with other children. Akira even talks to himself; he has to, because there's no adult coaching him so he must impersonate an elder adviser.

Whatever its roughness and excess, "Nobody Knows" is intense and powerful film-making. Koreeda has put his whole heart and soul into this movie and with it achieves an experience you can't shrug off. Nor will you forget the kids, especially the beautiful boy, Yûya Yagira, who may be growing inch by inch into a star even as we speak.


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What did Saki do for the money? danib60
Am I the only one who thought the mother was a prostitute? chris-olson2
Grave of the Fireflies reference? manicm
nice photo of the cast blx118
Nobody Knows soundtrack... blx118
Did her voice annoy the hell out of anyone else? philistine-985-817685
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