6.6/10
491
8 user 17 critic

Kill Your Idols (2004)

A documentary on thirty years of alternative NYC rock 'n roll.

Director:

(as S.A. Crary)
1 win. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Ron Albertson ...
Himself
Angus Andrew ...
Himself
Tristan Bechet ...
Himself
Hisham Bharoocha ...
Himself
Glenn Branca ...
Himself
Sebastien Brault ...
Himself
Brian Chase ...
Himself
Bjorn Copeland ...
Himself
Eric Copeland ...
Himself
Susan Donaldson ...
Herself
Michael Gira ...
Himself
Aaron Hemphill ...
Himself
...
Himself
Oren Kaplan ...
Himself
Arto Lindsay ...
Himself
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Storyline

A documentary on thirty years of alternative NYC rock 'n roll.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

You Are A Target Market.

Genres:

Documentary | Music

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

27 January 2007 (Japan)  »

Also Known As:

Gremise ta eidola sou  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$3,274 (USA) (7 July 2006)

Gross:

$7,753 (USA) (28 July 2006)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title of the film is inspired by the Sonic Youth song "Kill Yr Idols". See more »

Connections

Features The Wild World of Lydia Lunch (1983) See more »

Soundtracks

Tremens
by Sonic Youth
Courtesy of Sonic Youth / SYR
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User Reviews

 
No Wave - New York - Next Wave
12 April 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

A short documentary about the New York, 'No Wave' music scene. Bridging past and present, this movie starts out well, and the interviews with some of the older artists were great. Truthful, unpretentious, no holds barred. What was 'No Wave?' A musical movement that grew out of Punk Rock. Was it Punk Rock? Well, sort of, but not really. It was/is a more artistic expression, more of an experimental ethic. Unconventional to be sure, but the association by sound (with Punk) isn't as strong as the ethic (revolutionary). This documentary was obviously trying to show the continuation of this ethic, from past to present. I think it would have been better served as a focus on the roots of this movement, as the connection to the current music scene (up to 2004), paints the current group as more concerned with commercial aspects of their success, than they are with an honest expression of their own music. I like the way they let the artists tell the story, but some of the footage was a bit rough (poor quality), and then there was the totally unnecessary scene depicting oral sex?! What the? Why was that in there? In the end, it was a part of my past that really enjoyed this movie.


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