6.6/10
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8 user 2 critic

The Art of Action: Martial Arts in Motion Picture (2002)

A look at the history of martial arts films from their chinese roots to the present, presented by Samuel L. Jackson.

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(as Keith Clarke)

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Credited cast:
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Himself - Interviewee
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Herself - Interviewee
Raymond Chow ...
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Himself
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Latrell Walker in Exit Wounds (archive footage)
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Himself - Interviewee
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Himself - Narrator
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Himself (archive footage)
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Himself - Interviewee
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Himself - Interviewee (archive footage)
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Himself - Interviewee
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Himself - Interviewee
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Himself - Interviewee
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Himself - Interviewee
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Storyline

A look at the history of martial arts films from their chinese roots to the present, presented by Samuel L. Jackson.

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Genres:

Documentary

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Release Date:

June 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Arte Marcial no Cinema  »

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Did You Know?

Quotes

Bruce Lee: To me - okay? - to me, ultimately martial art means honestly expressing yourself. That is very difficult to do.
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Connections

Features Shanghai Noon (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Amazing Documentary!!!
4 May 2004 | by See all my reviews

If you want to know all about Martial Arts movies from the works of King Hu (whose films inspired Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) to the more famous Chang Cheh action pics to even modern day Jet Li movies this is it! A really great and well narrated (Sam Jackson) documentary that is the perfect primer for the genre. The only problem was the total absence of Jimmy Wang Yu who made quite a few really great Kung Fu movies (leaning towards the fantastic). He was the big deal before Bruce Lee moved in and then he started directing his own stuff in the 70's. His Master of the Flying Guillotine is one of the best Kung Fu movies out there. Besides that hiccup it's a ton of fun and seriously informative.


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