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The Will of James Waldron (1912)

When James Waldron died he divided his will to include his crippled son, William, and his pretty daughter, Mabel, and a son of an old friend. Watkins, his old friend's son, made life ... See full summary »

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James Waldron - Mary's Crippled Brother
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When James Waldron died he divided his will to include his crippled son, William, and his pretty daughter, Mabel, and a son of an old friend. Watkins, his old friend's son, made life miserable for the brother and sister. He frequently kicked and maltreated the cripple and repeatedly insulted the girl. She petitioned one of the cowboys to help her. He interceded and Watkins knocked him down for his pains. Then one day came Ralph Coswell, handsome, strong and with something of a reputation for being able to take care of himself. He and Mabel fell in love at once. The brother confided their trouble to him and he interceded with such good results that Watkins carried a black eye for some time. Watkins, revengeful, determined to kill Ralph. He saw them standing together, slowly pulled his gun and took aim. At the other end of the yard stood the cowboy before mentioned, calmly rolling a cigarette. He dropped his tobacco and paper, slowly pulled his gun and took aim. Another instant and ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama | Western

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29 August 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The Flying A people are pulling a strong oar in the photoplay business
21 January 2017 | by See all my reviews

A strongly tragic picture with good characterization. The Flying A people are pulling a strong oar in the photoplay business with these tragic pictures of human lives in the rough. There is a breath of surrounding wilderness in them. They show the forces that made the conquest of the American. Southwest possible, choosing moments when the energy was turned inward to self-destruction. They are vivid presentations. They, at their best, are like flashes of electric fire. The storm is clearing the atmosphere and they open at the moment when the flame is about to strike. The best of them even may not be, surely are not, the greatest American pictures; but they are truly and thoroughly American pioneer pictures. They picture us. No one in this country could rightly be ashamed of what they show, very few of us would be. We are not a nation of mollycoddles. Some of us are as thoroughly bad as men have ever been and some of us are as thoroughly good. In these pictures the good triumphs. In real life it doesn't always; but we, as a nation, like to have it so, will have it so if possible. We are still a fighting people. We are not yet ready to put up. with evil, just because it is. - The Moving Picture World, August 31, 1912


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