Rip's story is too well known to need repetition. How he came home drunk one night during a terrible storm and was driven away from the house by his wife, Gretchen. How he wandered up into ... See full summary »
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Sue Balfour ...
Gretchen - Rip's Wife
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Rip's story is too well known to need repetition. How he came home drunk one night during a terrible storm and was driven away from the house by his wife, Gretchen. How he wandered up into the mountains and met Hendrick Hudson and his demons who urged him to drink with them. How he fell asleep after drinking and slept for twenty years, awakening finally to find himself an old man. How his false friend, Derrick Von Beekman, claimed his houses and lands while he was away, by pretending to have a document from Rip turning them all over to him. How Derrick married Gretchen and made her very unhappy. How Rip arrived home after twenty years, just in time to save his wife and his home by producing an old, faded document from his game bag, which proved conclusively that nothing belonged to Derrick. The pretty love story between Rip's daughter Meenie and young Heinrich Vedderm, sweethearts since childhood, carries the same interest that it always did. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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6 July 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Will make a valuable addition to the available list of school subjects
10 December 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Washington Irving's famous legend, made so by Joseph Jefferson, has been filmed, and will make a valuable addition to the available list of school subjects. The story covers two reels. It follows more the lines of the play than those of the book, but it is to be regretted that old dog Wolf is omitted from the film. The first scene is of the village tavern; on a board in the background is conspicuously posted "Rip's score." Rip is being plied with drink by the wily tavernkeeper, and between steins he plays with the children, the same old, lighthearted, good-for-nothing, who will work for everybody hut himself, laid down in the book. When Rip returns to his home he finds Dame Van Winkle in one of her choicest fits of rage. The lightning shows at the window when the gale blows the shutter ajar. The two young Van Winkles are watching their father as he caresses their mother and tries stealthily to abstract the maternal purse from the pocket of the ample apron. Detected, repulsed, and enjoined to "Get out and don't come back!" Rip goes out into the black storm. Dame Van Winkle repents, but her calls fail to reach the ears of Rip. The second reel opens with Rip in the mountains, carrying his long-barreled gun. This weapon, by the way, is not a flintlock; it is a percussion-cap affair, an invention of many years following Rip's ante-Revolutionary days. We see the runtlike, elflike, bewhiskered bowlers at play; they induce Rip to "take something," which, as always, was not difficult, and Rip sleeps. The awakening of the sleeper and his return to the village, his stop at the tavern and the scenes at his home, where he is reunited with his family, his once sharp-tongued wife now as meek as formerly she was vitriolic, and the ejection of the master of the house ad interim, are all well done. - The Moving Picture World, July 6, 1912


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