In a succession of splendidly enacted scenes, we are led, step by step from the beginning of the dissatisfaction of the Indian troops at Lucknow. Finally the outbreak occurs and we are ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
James Gordon ...
General Havelock
William R. Randall ...
Major Banks (as William Randall)
...
Reginald - the British Officer (as Benjamin Wilson)
...
The Messenger
Charles Sutton ...
The Minister
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Helen
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Storyline

In a succession of splendidly enacted scenes, we are led, step by step from the beginning of the dissatisfaction of the Indian troops at Lucknow. Finally the outbreak occurs and we are shown the night of May 12th, 1857, and just what occurred on that memorable evening at Lucknow. At the beginning of the mutiny we are shown the burning of the officers' houses, the news of the outbreak received by Sir Henry Lawrence and also the manner of Sir Henry Lawrence's death, his burial at night, midst shot and shell and, like Sir Thomas Moore. No useless coffin enclosed his breast. Nor sheet nor shroud rebound him, but he lay like a warrior taking his rest with his military cloak around him. Hospital scones are shown giving one an idea of the work that befell the women during the siege. General Havelock is also introduced and he is shown starting for the relief of Lucknow from Cawnpore. This all eventually leads up to that never-to-be-forgotten moment at Lucknow when hopes had deserted them and ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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27 July 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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This picture treats this big theme effectively
7 January 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

An emotional, historical melodrama. The very name Lucknow has been made dramatic by its heroic defense during the Sepoy mutiny, by the stirring incident of its relief, and by the work of poets and novelists who have heightened its story and glorified it. This picture treats this big theme effectively. After the opening scenes of the mutiny, we are shown pictures of what happened day after day in the beleaguered city. No other scene in the picture reaches a finer summit of emotion than that in which the city's commander, Sir Henry Lawrence, refuses to be interrupted during the chaplain's prayer, even though the Sepoys had broken through the wall. The sending of the messenger to Gen. Havelock at Cawnpore and the coming of the relief make a fitting ending. It is a picture that will stir and awaken enthusiasm. The photography is as good as usual in Edison pictures. General Havelock is played by James Gordon; Major Banks, of the besieged garrison, by William Randall; the minister, by Charles Sutton, and the British officer who took the message through, by Richard Niel. - The Moving Picture World, August 10, 1912


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