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Night Watch (2004) Poster

(2004)

Trivia

Konstantin Khabenskiy, who plays Anton, actually worked briefly as a night watchman before he became an actor.
In the final book of the series, "Last Watch", first Semyon, then Yegor reference some noticeable events of this movie, having seen them in their dreams, and Anton tells them dreams are sometimes messages from parallel worlds. This might explain all the differences between the "Watch" movies and the "Watch" books.
Official selection from Russia for the Academy Awards of 2005.
This film broke all records in Russia and became the #1 box-office movie of all time. The record was broken the following year by the Russian movie Turetskiy gambit (2005).
The film was a huge box-office hit in Russia, which made it widely despised by an underground nonconformist intellectual movement "Padonki", who criticized it for wide use of Hollywood-style filming and lack of ideas behind the FX. They labeled the movie "Nochnoy Pozor" (Night Shame).
The novel "Night Watch" comprises three interconnected stories (as does every book in the "Watch" series). This film covers only one of them, the two others serving as a basis for the sequel.
In Anton's apartment, a reproduction of Rembrandt's painting "Nightwatch" can be briefly seen reflected in a window.
In the novel "Night Watch", Alissa Donnikova was not a singer and was not in a group of four girls but Zhanna Friske, who portrays her in the film, actually is a singer and was actually part of the band that appears on stage in one of the scenes. The band is called "Blestyashchiye".
Originally, the film, as well as its sequels, was commissioned by Channel One as a four-part mini-series for television. The rushes impressed the executives so much that they decided the material merited big-screen treatment.
The name of the motor ship appearing at the beginning of the film is M-43 (M stands for Moskvich class). The song playing on the ship is a Russian hit of the late 1980s, called "Na teplokhode muzyka igrayet" ("Music is Playing on the Motor Ship").
One of the paper pictures on the wall at the witch's home is a small reproduction of "Vertumnus" by Giuseppe Arcimboldo.

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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