Le scaphandre et le papillon
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The 80th Academy Awards: If I had been a voter

7 August 2017 2:00 PM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Here we go again folks! As promised (though perhaps a bit later than initially planned), I’m diving back into the world of previous Oscar ceremonies. This time, I have my sights set on the 80th Academy Awards ceremony. You should know the drill by now. I’m going to state what I would have picked in the major eight categories if I had been lucky enough to have been able to vote. In most cases, it deviates from the actual winner. You’ll see how much that was the case this time around, and sit tight, as I do hope to make this a bit more of a consistent thing (excuse the gap again) and really go back as far as I can go. Until then, just enjoy this new one… Alright then, once again here goes nothing ladies and gentlemen…behold my picks for this particular ceremony: Best »

- Joey Magidson

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Heidi Klum’s Boyfriend Responds After Photos Surface of Him Allegedly Kissing Another Woman

24 June 2017 12:16 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Heidi Klum‘s boyfriend Vito Schnabel is setting the record straight.

After British tabloid published blurry photos of the 30-year-old art dealer allegedly kissing a mystery woman during a night out in London early Friday morning, Schnabel is clearing the air, explaining that it was an “innocent situation.”

“The claims that have been made are a misinterpretation of an entirely innocent situation,” Schnabel said in a statement to People. “There is nothing more to this than I was simply saying goodnight to a family friend and we went on our separate ways.

A source also tells People that there is »

- Katherine Richter and Sara Nathan

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‘Star Wars’: Don’t Get Mad at Kathleen Kennedy For That Han Solo Shake-Up

23 June 2017 9:36 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present, and future.

When the “Star Wars” universe imploded earlier this week with the surprising news that Han Solo standalone filmmakers Phil Lord and Chris Miller were leaving the project after completing nearly 75% of principal photography, initial reports immediately fixated on the most likely culprit for the split: disagreements with Lucasfilm head and “Star Wars” super-producer Kathleen Kennedy. While it seems unlikely that the “real” story of what went down behind the scenes — a true “three sides to every story” situation, as producer Robert Evans was fond of saying — will ever come out, Kennedy is at the center of reports about wild demands and on-set clashes.

One thing is clear, however — whatever Lord and Miller were envisioning for their “Star Wars” debut is not what Kennedy had in mind, and while we’re still mourning the “Star Wars” film that will never be, the veteran producer deserves all of the respect that goes with her decision. She’s the one in charge of maintaining the “Star Wars” legacy, and with good reason.

Read More: Ron Howard’s ‘Star Wars’: We Debate the New Choice For Lucasfilm’s Han Solo Movie

As the head of a massive studio and a high-powered producer with a slew of huge credits under her belt (“Indiana Jones” to “Star Wars,” “Lincoln” to “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly,” and that’s only scraping the top of a stuffed resume), Kennedy is in a rarefied position. That she’s a woman is even more unique, a gate-crasher who has earned her stripes over decades in the business, only to emerge as the principal brain behind the world’s biggest franchise.

Kennedy first entered the entertainment world in a roundabout way, infamously serving as director John Milius’ assistant after she graduated college and putting in some serious time producing a small local TV talk show in her native Northern California. At the time, Milius was producing Steven Spielberg’s “1941,” and Spielberg soon poached her to be his own secretary, a job she was apparently not great at (as it turns out, she couldn’t really type).

But from the start, Kennedy had a lot of compelling ideas, and Spielberg eventually brought her on as a producer. Just two years after their initial introduction, Kennedy co-founded Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment alongside her future husband Frank Marshall. Kennedy’s intelligence was remarkable, and so were her leadership skills, and she was soon named president of Amblin.

Plenty more big gigs followed, including the launching of The Kennedy/Marshall Company with her husband, big-time producing credits on a number of films (a number of which were directed by Spielberg), and her eventual role as co-chair of Lucasfilm alongside George Lucas. Kennedy’s track record is awe-inspiring, including over 92 film and television credits (an intriguing mix of blockbusters and prestige pictures) and eight Oscar nominations for Best Picture. In terms of pure money-making power alone, she’s behind only Spielberg and Marvel mastermind Stan Lee for domestic box office take (nearly $7 billion as of this writing).

After Disney purchased Lucasfilm in 2012, she became both president and brand manager. If it’s “Star Wars,” it goes through her. The homogenization of franchise films is certainly an issue in an industry increasingly interested in churning out tentpoles, but a dedication to cohesion and a larger sense of story are essential elements for such wide-ranging series. That’s what Kennedy is tasked with overseeing, and it’s not always easy.

The Han Solo situation remains a weird outlier in an industry that has seen plenty of strange stuff go down; Kennedy and her cohorts are in mostly uncharted waters, though a similar situation did unspool over at Marvel in 2015. When Edgar Wright left his long-gestating “Ant-Man” after nearly a decade of work on the project, Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige was believed to have balked at Wright’s burgeoning vision, one that didn’t align with the larger aims of the McU. As with Lord and Miller, Wright left the project due to “creative differences.”

Feige later explained to The Guardian why he made that tough choice: “We sat round a table and we realized it was not working. A part of me wishes we could have figured that out in the eight years we were working on it. But better for us and for Edgar that we figure it out then, and not move it through production.” Feige’s choice was hard enough; Kennedy is almost unfathomable.

As IndieWire’s Anne Thompson noted earlier this week, “Kennedy’s purpose is to stay on course — as Kevin Feige does with Marvel — and keep the ‘Star Wars’ universe humming and intact as it spins into many orbits. She can take responsibility for miscasting in this case, because Lord and Miller are who they are and, once hired, should be able to do what they do.”

She has excelled at that, and while the Lord and Miller exit seems indicative of major behind-the-scenes drama, it may actually point in the opposite direction: that Kennedy is so compelled to do right by the brand that she’ll make a huge change in order to reach the necessary end goal.

Kennedy does still have plenty to learn about navigating the ever-changing waters of franchise filmmaking, in ways that extend beyond whatever led to the Han Solo fallout.

In November of last year, she drew ire over comments about the lack of women directors on “Star Wars” projects. Kennedy explained that, while finding a female director for a “Star Wars” film was a priority, they just hadn’t found someone with the right level of experience just yet — seemingly forgetting how many male directors they’ve employed who also haven’t come to the table with built-in blockbuster credits. At the time, Kennedy said, “We want to make sure that when we bring a female director in to do ‘Star Wars,’ they’re set up for success. They’re gigantic films, and you can’t come into them with essentially no experience.”

Read More: Han Solo Upheaval: Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s ‘Star Wars’ Exit

Later, she attempted to clarify her comments, responding to a question at the “Rogue One” press conference. “That quote was taken out of context,” she said. “As you can imagine, I have every intention of giving somebody an opportunity. So, if somebody actually moves through the process of making movies and wants to make a ‘Star Wars’ movie, and shows that they have actually stepped into the role on that level, of course we’re going to consider a woman. That goes without saying.” Kennedy’s criteria for a “Star Wars” filmmaker still seemed dead-set on only pursuing filmmakers who meet a criteria that sounds reliant on resume credits over passion and skill.

But Kennedy has both — an enviable track record and an obvious affection for the massive series she’s in charge of shepherding through impossible decisions. She’s already installed Ron Howard as the film’s finishing director, and every press release has insisted that the film will come out on time. Will it be worth it? We’ll have to see, but it’s clear that Kennedy will be front and center for whatever the final product looks like. After all, it’s her franchise.

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Related storiesRian Johnson and Ana Lily Amirpour Talk 'Star Wars,' 'The Bad Batch' and Cinematic Boners -- ListenHan Solo Firing Proves Studios' Franchises Don't Want Directors To Be Storytellers'Star Wars' and Lucasfilm Have Lost Their Sense of Humor, and Firing Lord and Miller is Only One Example »

- Kate Erbland

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More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

20 June 2017 8:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

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Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look

23 May 2017 2:37 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If anyone can show us something we haven’t seen before about Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, it’s Oscar-nominated painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel, who announced at Cannes that he will direct “At Eternity’s Gate” starring Willem Dafoe (who also stars in Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project”) as the world’s most acclaimed Post-Impressionist painter, who died at age 37 before he was recognized for his gifts.

“I’ve been working on it for a couple of years,” said Schnabel on the phone from Montauk. “It has to do with trying to make a work of art. By making a film about him, I might shed a little light on what it is to be doing what he’s doing, who he really was, and what his issues were, what somebody needed to do to do what he did, and what he’s not going to do.”

Produced by »

- Anne Thompson

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Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look

23 May 2017 2:37 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

If anyone can show us something we haven’t seen before about Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, it’s Oscar-nominated painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel, who announced at Cannes that he will direct “At Eternity’s Gate” starring Willem Dafoe (who also stars in Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project”) as the world’s most acclaimed Post-Impressionist painter, who died at age 37 before he was recognized for his gifts.

“I’ve been working on it for a couple of years,” said Schnabel on the phone from Montauk. “It has to do with trying to make a work of art. By making a film about him, I might shed a little light on what it is to be doing what he’s doing, who he really was, and what his issues were, what somebody needed to do to do what he did, and what he’s not going to do.”

Produced by »

- Anne Thompson

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Newswire: Willem Dafoe to play Vincent van Gogh in impressionistic new biopic

22 May 2017 10:24 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Over the years, Vincent van Gogh has been played by Kirk Douglas, Benedict Cumberbatch, and even Tony Curran in those Doctor Who episodes. But now it’s Willem Dafoe’s turn to tackle the impressionist in an upcoming film titled At Eternity’s Gate, Deadline reports. Given the talent involved, it’s safe to assume that this isn’t your standard biopic: It’s being directed by The Diving Bell And The Butterfly’s Julian Schnabel, who’s also a visual artist, and looks to be a more impressionistic—get it?—take on the painter. “This is a film about painting and a painter and their relationship to infinity,” Schnabel says. “It is told by a painter. It contains what I felt were essential moments in his life; this is not the official history—it’s my version. One that I hope could make you closer to him.” Yes, but »

- Esther Zuckerman

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‘The Diving Bell and the Butterfly’: Julian Schnabel’s Profoundly Cinematic Exercise in Empathy

22 May 2017 5:37 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

Has there ever been a more perfect pairing of medium and story than Julian Schnabel‘s The Diving Bell and the Butterfly? Cinema, an optical art form whose audience views scenes that they are powerless to change, »

- The Film Stage

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Willem Dafoe to play Vincent van Gogh in At Eternity’s Gate

22 May 2017 12:15 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Deadline has revealed that Willem Dafoe is set to take on the role of legendary artist Vincent van Gogh in At Eternity’s Gate, the new film from Julian Schnabel (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Before Night Falls).

The film will focus on Van Gogh’s time in Arles and Auvers-sur-Oise, France, and is described as “a film about creativity and the sacrifices he made to produce the spectacular masterpieces that are instantly recognizable around the world today.”

“This is a film about painting and a painter and their relationship to infinity,” said Schnabel. “It is told by a painter. It contains what I felt were essential moments in his life; this is not the official history – it’s my version. One that I hope could make you closer to him.”

Dafoe’s new film The Florida Project premieres in Cannes this month. He will next be seen as »

- Amie Cranswick

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Global inks deals on Julian Schnabel doc

21 May 2017 11:00 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Film featuring Al Pacino sells to Germany and France.

Global Screen is doing a roaring trade on Julian Schnabel: A Private Portrait, the documentary about the larger-than-life New York artist and filmmaker that premiered at Tribeca last month.

Midway through the market, eye-catching deals have been closed with Weltkino in Germany and Pretty Pictures in France. Cohen Media Group previously secured North American rights.

Directed by Pappi Corsicato (Libera, The Seed Of Discord), the film offers an in-depth portrait of Schnabel, an enfant terrible of the New York arts scene who has a parallel career as a filmmaker, directing such features as Before Night Falls and The Diving Bell And The Butterfly.

Al Pacino, Jeff Koons, Bono, Laurie Anderson and Willem Dafoe are among the contributors. The film includes material from Schnabel’s own archive of home movies and photographs. »

- geoffrey@macnab.demon.co.uk (Geoffrey Macnab)

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Willem Dafoe To Star In Vincent Van Gogh Biopic At Eternity’S Gate

20 May 2017 5:50 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“When facing a flat landscape I see nothing but eternity. Am I the only one to see it?” “Existence can’t be without reason.” – Vincent Van Gogh, 1888

Rocket Science announced today that Golden Globe Winner Julian Schnabel (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Before Night Falls) will direct At Eternity’S Gate, which will star Academy Award Nominee Willem Dafoe (Spider-Man, John Wick) as Vincent van Gogh.

Based on a screenplay by Schnabel and Jean-Claude Carrière, the story focuses on the time in Vincent’s life that he spent in Arles and Auvers-sur-Oise, France.

Academy Award Nominee Jon Kilik (The Hunger Games franchise, Babel) will produce the film, which will be shot on location in France. Rocket Science is handling international sales and CAA is representing the U.S rights.

“This is a film about painting and a painter and their relationship to infinity. It is told by a painter. »

- Michelle Hannett

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Willem Dafoe To Play Vincent Van Gogh In Julian Schnabel’s ‘At Eternity’s Gate’ – Cannes

20 May 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Willem Dafoe is set to play Vincent van Gogh in Julian Schnabel's upcoming project At Eternity's Gate. Schnabel, who nabbed the Best Director prize in Cannes in 2007 for The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, writes the script with Jean-Claude Carriere. Rocket Science is handling international sales and CAA is repping domestic rights. Jon Kilik (The Hunger Games, Babel) will produce the film. Story focuses on the time in Van Gogh's life that he spent in Arles and… »

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Willem Dafoe to Play Van Gogh in Julian Schnabel’s ‘At Eternity’s Gate’

20 May 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Willem Dafoe is set to play Vincent van Gogh in Julian Schnabel’s “At Eternity’s Gate,” for which Rocket Science is handling international sales and CAA is representing U.S rights.

Based on a screenplay by Schnabel and Jean-Claude Carriere, the story focuses on the time in Van Gogh’s life that he spent in Arles and Auvers-sur-Oise, France. Jon Kilik (“The Hunger Games” franchise, “Babel”) will produce the film, which will be shot on location in France.

“This is a film about painting and a painter, and their relationship to infinity. It is told by a painter. It contains what I felt were essential moments in his life, this is not the official history — it’s my version. One that I hope could make you closer to him,” Schnabel said.

Kilik said: “After more than 20 years of working together, I am excited to continue my collaboration with Julian. »

- Leo Barraclough

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Cannes: Willem Dafoe to Play Vincent van Gogh in 'At Eternity's Gate'

20 May 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Willem Dafoe will play iconic painter Vincent van Gogh in the film At Eternity's Gate, helmed by Julian Schnabel (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Before Night Falls).

Based on a screenplay by Schnabel and Jean-Claude Carriere, the film is centered on the time in Vincent's life that he spent in Arles and Auvers-sur-Oise, France. 

Jon Kilik, who has produced all of Schnabel's projects, will produce At Eternity's Gate, which will shoot on location in France. Rocket Science is handling international sales and CAA is representing the U.S rights.

"This is a film about painting and a painter and their »

- Rebecca Ford

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Willem Dafoe to play Vincent van Gogh in 'At Eternity's Gate'

20 May 2017 5:24 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Rocket Science boards international sales in Cannes.

Julian Schnabel will direct At Eternity’s Gate with Willem Dafoe set to star as the tortured Dutch Post-Impressionist master Vincent van Gogh

Rocket Science is introducing international sales on the Croisette and Schnabel’s longtime collaborator Jon Kilik from The Hunger Games franchise and Babel is producing.

At Eternity’s Gate will focus on van Gogh’s time in Arles and Auvers-sur-Oise, France, and is based on a screenplay by Schnabel and Jean-Claude Carrière. CAA represents Us rights to the project, which will shoot on location in France.

“This is a film about painting and a painter and their relationship to infinity,” said Schnabel. “It is told by a painter. It contains what I felt were essential moments in his life, this is not the official history – it’s my version. One that I hope could make you closer to him.”

Kilik added: “After over 20 years of working together »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Review: ‘Everything, Everything’ Crashes Under Its Own Self-Seriousness

18 May 2017 8:43 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Perhaps there’s nothing worse than a film with a campy premise that takes itself too seriously. Everything, Everything takes it title from a spoiler alert its lead character Maddy Whittier (Amandla Stenberg) leaves on her blog as she reviews Flowers for Algernon, another story about a chronically ill character (“Love is Everything. Everything”). This is a dull, illogical, yet sincere and well-meaning drama. Sadly, its core audience should demand more from their entertainment.

The sophomore effort from director Stella Meghie — whose debut feature, the delightful family comedy Jean of the Joneses, enjoyed a healthy life on the festival circuit last year and a well-deserved Spirit Award nomination — Everything, Everything crashes by taking itself way too seriously as it chronicles the young love of homebound Maddy and the boy next door Olly Bright (Nick Robinson). Diagnosed early in life by her physician mother Pauline (Anika Noni Rose) with a case »

- John Fink

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New to Streaming: ‘Things to Come,’ Jacques Rivette, ‘I Am Not Your Negro,’ ‘Blow Out,’ and More

5 May 2017 4:48 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Blow Out (Brian De Palma)

In a career fixated on the machinations of filmmaking presented through both a carnal and political eye, Brian De Palma’s fascinations converged idyllically with Blow Out. In his ode to the conceit of Blow UpMichelangelo Antonioni’s deeply influential English-language debut, released 15 years prior — as well as the aural intrigue of Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, De Palma constructs a conspiracy »

- The Film Stage

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‘Heal the Living’ Trailer: Tahar Rahim-Starring César-Nominated Drama Details Fallout of Tremendous Tragedy — Watch

6 April 2017 10:33 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

After screening at the Venice Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, and Rendez-Vous with French Cinema, Kattell Quillévéré’s lauded “Heal the Living” is headed for its theatrical release.

Read More: Venice Film Festival 2016 Winners: Emma Stone And Tom Ford Earn Major Prizes

Based on the novel “Heart,” “Heal the Living” takes place in the aftermath of a tragic car accident leaving a young man, Simon (Gabin Verdet), braindead and forcing his family to decide his fate. Intertwining with a other narrative plots, the decisions one family makes regarding the donation of their son’s organs changes the lives of both the ones he leaves behind and the ones with the possibility of a greater future.

The film has an incredible cast, starring Tahar Rahim (“A Prophet,” “The Past”), Emmanuelle Seigner (“Venus in Fur,” “In The House,” “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly”), Anne Dorval (“Mommy,” “I Killed My Mother”), Kool Shen, »

- Kerry Levielle

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‘Jack Ryan’ Adds Marie-Josée Croze; Emayatzy Corinealdi Joins HBO’s ‘Ballers’

22 February 2017 5:03 PM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

French actress Marie-Josée Croze (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly) is set to recur in Amazon's upcoming Jack Ryan series, from the Lost duo of co-showrunner Carlton Cuse and writer Graham Roland, Platinum Dunes, Skydance Media and Paramount TV. Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan is a reinvention with a modern sensibility of the author’s famed hero, starring John Krasinski and Abbie Cornish. It centers on Jack Ryan (Krasinski), an up-and-coming CIA analyst thrust into a dangerous… »

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Every Book Emma Watson Has Ever Recommended

21 February 2017 2:04 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

 A version of this article originally appeared on ew.com.

Emma Watson loves to read.

The actress has that in common with her brainy Harry Potter character Hermione as well as bookish Belle, who she plays in the much-anticipated film Beauty and the Beast, out March 17. In addition to being a bookworm, Watson is also an outspoken feminist and as well as a Un Women Goodwill Ambassador and promoter of the organization’s HeForShe movement, which is dedicated to recruiting men into the movement for gender equality. As a response to her work with the Un, she launched the feminist »

- Madeline Raynor

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