Sometimes in April (2005) - News Poster

(2005 TV Movie)

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Hulu Wants to Be Your New Netflix, Hiring AMC’s Programming Boss to Help Plan The Attack

  • Indiewire
Hulu’s ready to go beast mode, and has recruited AMC’s programming chief to help it grow its footprint as one of TV’s key streaming services.

Joel Stillerman, who spent nearly 10 years at AMC Networks – most recently as president of original programming and development for AMC and Sundance TV – has been named Hulu’s first-ever chief content officer.

Stillerman’s mandate? Come up with a content strategy that will grow Hulu’s advertising revenue (don’t forget, unlike Netflix, a good chunk of Hulu’s users see ads) and subscriber growth.

Hulu’s subscriber base was around 12 million last year, and at its upfront presentation last week, the company reported 47 million total unique viewers. But it still has a way to go to catch up to competitors Netflix and Amazon: According to eMarketer, Netflix boasts around 128 million individual users this year, while Amazon has around 85.3 million viewers.

Read
See full article at Indiewire »

Hulu Wants to Be Your New Netflix, Hiring AMC’s Programming Boss to Help Plan The Attack

Hulu’s ready to go beast mode, and has recruited AMC’s programming chief to help it grow its footprint as one of TV’s key streaming services.

Joel Stillerman, who spent nearly 10 years at AMC Networks – most recently as president of original programming and development for AMC and Sundance TV – has been named Hulu’s first-ever chief content officer.

Stillerman’s mandate? Come up with a content strategy that will grow Hulu’s advertising revenue (don’t forget, unlike Netflix, a good chunk of Hulu’s users see ads) and subscriber growth.

Hulu’s subscriber base was around 12 million last year, and at its upfront presentation last week, the company reported 47 million total unique viewers. But it still has a way to go to catch up to competitors Netflix and Amazon: According to eMarketer, Netflix boasts around 128 million individual users this year, while Amazon has around 85.3 million viewers.

Read
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Berlinale 2017 Reveals First Premieres Including Films From Aki Kaurismäki, Oren Moverman & More

After Sundance Film Festival concludes in late January, the next big cinematic event on the globe is the Berlin International Film Festival. With Paul Verhoeven serving as jury president for the 67th edition of the festival, they’ve now announced their first line-up of titles, including Aki Kaurismäki‘s The Other Side of Hope (pictured above), Oren Moverman‘s Richard Gere-led The Dinner, Sally Potter‘s The Party (pictured below), and Agnieszka Holland‘s Spoor, as well as a restoration of a Rainer Werner Fassbinder TV show.

Check out the first titles below, and return for our coverage from the festival.

Competition

A teströl és a lélekröl (On Body and Soul)

Hungary

By Ildiko Enyedi (My 20th Century, Simon the Magician)

With Géza Morcsányi, Alexandra Borbély, Zoltán Schneider

World premiere

Ana, mon amour

Romania/Germany/France

By Călin Peter Netzer (Child‘s Pose, Maria)

With Mircea Postelnicu, Diana Cavallioti,
See full article at The Film Stage »

First films for the Competition of the Berlinale 2017 announced

In February of 2017, the 67th Berlin International Film Festival kicks off in Germany, and once again Thn will be there to bring you all of the latest news and reviews from the Potzdamer-Platz in the heart of the city.

The first films that will compete in-competition at next year’s festival have been announced, and it looks like we’ll get to see new work from the likes of Aki Kaurismäki, Oren Moverman, Agnieszka Holland, Andres Veiel, and Sally Potter.

Films Belgium, Chile, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, Hungary, Lebanon, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Senegal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, and the USA are amongst the first 14 with more to be announced in the coming weeks.

Here’s the initial list in full.

Competition

A teströl és a lélekröl (On Body and Soul)

Hungary

By Ildiko Enyedi (My 20th Century, Simon the Magician)

With Géza Morcsányi,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Kaurismäki, Potter, Trueba among Berlin first wave

  • ScreenDaily
Kaurismäki, Potter, Trueba among Berlin first wave
Aki Kaurismäki, Oren Moverman, Agnieszka Holland, Sally Potter among competition lineup.

The first 14 films have been announced for the Competition and Berlinale Special sections of the 67th Berlin International Film Festival.

Among directors with movies in competition are Aki Kaurismäki, Oren Moverman, Agnieszka Holland, Andres Veiel, Sebastián Lelio and Sally Potter.

Moverman’s (The Messenger) mystery-drama The Dinner stars Richard Gere, Laura Linney, Steve Coogan, Rebecca Hall and Chloë Sevigny.

Fernando Trueba’s comedy-drama The Queen of Spain, starring Penelope Cruz, will get its international premiere in the Berlinale Special strand.

More to follow…

Competition

A teströl és a lélekröl (On Body and Soul) (Hungary)

By Ildiko Enyedi (My 20th Century, Simon the Magician)

With Géza Morcsányi, Alexandra Borbély, Zoltán Schneider

World premiere

Ana, mon amour (Romania / Germany / France)

By Călin Peter Netzer (Child‘s Pose, Maria)

With Mircea Postelnicu, Diana Cavallioti, Carmen Tănase, Adrian Titieni, Vlad Ivanov

World premiere

Beuys - Documentary (Germany)

By Andres Veiel ([link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Berlin Film Festival Reveals First Competition Section Films

Berlin Film Festival Reveals First Competition Section Films
Oren Moverman’s “The Dinner,” starring Richard Gere, Laura Linney, Steve Coogan, and Rebecca Hall, and Sally Potter’s “The Party,” starring Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz, Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy, Kristin Scott Thomas, and Timothy Spall, are among the first films selected for the competition section of the Berlin Film Festival, which runs Feb. 9-19. All are world premieres.

Also selected are Aki Kaurismaki’s “The Other Side of Hope,” Agnieszka Holland’s “Spoor,” Andres Veiel’s “Beuys,” Ildikó Enyedi’s “On Body and Soul,” Calin Peter Netzer’s “Ana, mon amour,” Teresa Villaverde’s “Colo,” Alain Gomis’ “Felicite,” and Sebastian Lelio’s “Una Mujer Fantastica.”

The festival also revealed four of the films that will play in its Berlinale Special section: Fernando Trueba’s “The Queen of Spain,” Raoul Peck’s “The Young Karl Marx,” Fernando Perez’s “Last Days in Havana,” and the world premiere of a restored
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Retrospective of Raoul Peck Films at BFI Southbank Centre in London in Dec.

Raoul Peck has been called many things: "political", "postcolonial public intellectual", and a provocateur. But he is, of course, best known as a filmmaker and one of the most incisive and powerful ones working today. Born in Haiti, because of his father's profession working at the U.N., he and his family traveled constantly from the Congo, to the U.S. and to France, which might explain why he makes films like "Sometimes in April" and "Moloch Tropical" which explore universal concerns, and how the powerful forces of politics, nature and personalities, mold and shape his characters and their actions, no matter in what country they're in. Since his...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Rwandan Women Heal Broken Community With Ice Cream In Sweet Dreams Trailer

For many Americans, it's impossible to imagine what life in the African nation of Rwanda is like. Maybe you know of its war-torn past and the Rwandan Genocide that killed nearly a million people as depicted in dramas like the Don Cheadle-fronted Hotel Rwanda, Shake Hands With the Devil, Sometimes in April with Idris Elba or Hugh Dancy's Beyond the Gates. But nearly 20 years have passed since this atrocity ripped the country's sense of community apart, and now is the time for a new story to emerge from Rwanda, one full of hope, joy, and inspiration. All of the above can be found above in the trailer for the documentary Sweet Dreams. This doc centers on a remarkable group of women who wished to drum in a new era in Rwanda, so they started a drum circle, defying conventions that only men may play the instrument. But literally
See full article at Cinema Blend »

Doc About Budding Rwandan Film Industry to Be Presented by AMPAS

Finding Hillywood’: Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to present documentary about Rwanda’s budding film industry The 2013 documentary Finding Hillywood, which offers a glimpse into the budding film industry in Rwanda, will be presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and Bpeace, the Business Council for Peace, at a special screening on Monday, October 21, at 7 p.m. at the Academy Theater in New York City. The Finding Hillywood screening will be followed by an onstage discussion with Leah Warshawski, who directed and produced the documentary with Christopher Towey, and production designer Wynn Thomas (Ron Howard’s A Beautiful Mind, Spike Lee’s Inside Man), who was a member of the Academy’s International Outreach delegation to Rwanda and Kenya in 2011. According to the Academy’s website, Wynn Thomas and several other Academy delegates, among them actress Alfre Woodard (Cross Creek), writer-director Phil Robinson (Field of Dreams
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Idris Elba Talks Prometheus, Pacific Rim, Thor 2, Luther Season 3, Preparing to Play Nelson Mandela and More

  • Collider.com
British actor Idris Elba is firmly at the top of my list of actors whose performances both fascinate and intrigue me. Whether it’s as the infamous Stringer Bell in HBO’s The Wire, the complex detective John Luther in the often chilling BBC crime drama series Luther, the guardian of Asgard in the big-budget blockbuster Thor, smaller character pieces like Legacy or Sometimes in April, or guest starring roles on The Office and The Big C, he is always memorable. All of that considered, it is no surprise that I jumped at the chance to chat with Idris Elba for Collider, to promote his role as the captain of the spaceship that is headed on a mission to the darkest corners of the universe, in Ridley Scott’s highly anticipated sci-fi drama Prometheus, opening in theaters on June 8th. During the interview, he talked about getting the call from Ridley Scott about the role,
See full article at Collider.com »

Cannes 2012: Raoul Peck Talks Cinema As A Power Trip & Giving The Under-Represented A Voice

We have no right to speak in the name of others without legitimacy. Africa, for example, often serves as a backdrop in movies. Yet we see nothing of Africa, we don’t understand its problems. I think that we must get accustomed, and accustom our audiences, to other viewpoints. To adopt this stance, we must understand their problems, put ourselves in their shoes and, with certain humility, give them a voice. The cinema should be conceived in that way. Otherwise it remains a power trip. It is just a question of being ethically and politically sound. Words from Raoul Peck, the Haitian filmmaker (Lumumba, Moloch Tropical, Sometimes In April) in an interview at the Cannes Film Festival...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Set Visit: Ghost Rider Spirit of Vengeance

  • MovieWeb
Set Visit: Ghost Rider Spirit of Vengeance
We travel to Bucharest, Romania to visit Nicolas Cage and the rest of the cast on the set of Ghost Rider Spirit of Vengeance

Johnny Blaze will ride again! Scheduled for release on February 17th is Ghost Rider Spirit of Vengeance, the long-awaited sequel to '2007s anti-superhero film Ghost Rider, which was based on the popular Marvel Comics character and starred Oscar-winner Nicolas Cage, and Eva Mendes. In the original film, Nicolas Cage plays Johnny Blaze, a stunt motorcyclist who sells his soul to the Devil and as a result, transforms into the flaming vigilante Ghost Rider. While the first movie was a financial success earning over $200 million at the box office, it was a critical disaster and failed to score with fans of the original source material. However, with only Nicolas Cage returning for the sequel from the original cast, and new directors Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor
See full article at MovieWeb »

Focus Features Fourth Year Winners Announced

$10,000 In Financing Goes To Five

New Moviemakers For Their Short Films

New York, October 6th, 2011 . For a fourth consecutive year, Focus Features. Africa First program for short films, the worldwide film company.s initiative earmarked exclusively for emerging filmmakers of African nationality and residence, has awarded five filmmakers $10,000 apiece, Focus CEO James Schamus announced today.

The uniquely conceived initiative offers eligible and participating filmmakers the chance to be awarded the $10,000 in financing for pre-production, production, and/or post-production on their narrative short film made in continental Africa and tapping into the resources of the film industry there. Of equal importance, the program brings the filmmakers together with each other and with a renowned group of advisors, major figures in the African film world, for support and mentorship. The short films coming out of the program have been showcased at the Sundance, Toronto, and Berlin Film Festivals; the Film Society of
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Focus Features’ 2011 Africa First Program Call for Entries

2011 Entry Period For Focus Features.

Africa First Program To Commence May 16th;

$10,000 In Financing Apiece Earmarked For New Filmmakers

Focus Features will accept entries for its Africa First Program . entering its fourth year . beginning Monday, May 16th and continuing through Monday, August 22nd. Focus CEO James Schamus made the announcement today.

The uniquely conceived initiative, with funds earmarked exclusively for emerging filmmakers of African nationality and residence, is for the fourth consecutive year offering eligible and participating filmmakers the chance to be awarded $10,000 in financing for pre-production, production, and/or post-production on their narrative short film made in continental Africa and tapping into the resources of the film industry there. The program also brings the filmmakers together with each other and with a renowned group of advisors, major figures in the African film world, for support and mentorship. Complete details on Africa First . including application information . can be accessed year-round through www.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Call For Entries – 2011 Submission Dates For Focus Features’ Africa First Program

Here’s a program we’ve given a lot of ink to on this website, so I won’t rehash. Just read the press release received today, for all the relevant info…

For Immediate Release: 2011 Entry Period For Focus Features’ Africa First Program To Commence May 16th

2011 Entry Period For Focus Features

Africa First Program To Commence May 16th;

$10,000 In Financing Apiece Earmarked For New Filmmakers

New York , March 2nd, 2011 – Focus Features will accept entries for its Africa First Program – entering its fourth year – beginning Monday, May 16th and continuing through Monday, August 22nd. Focus CEO James Schamus made the announcement today.

The uniquely conceived initiative, with funds earmarked exclusively for emerging filmmakers of African nationality and residence, is for the fourth consecutive year offering eligible and participating filmmakers the chance to be awarded $10,000 in financing for pre-production, production, and/or post-production on their narrative short film made in continental
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Watch Vogue’s Profile Of Up-And-Coming Kenyan Filmmaker Wanuri Kahiu

Vogue Italia profiles award-winning Kenyan director Wanuri Kahiu in the video below; We’ve profiled and mentioned Wanuri on this website a number of times; she directed the Africa First Focus Features sci-fi short film, Pumzi, and she’s working on an adaptation of Nnedi Okorafor’s novel, Who Fears Death. Kisha Cameron-Dingle, who previously served as associate producer on Raoul Peck’s Sometimes in April and Spike Lee’s Bamboozled, is producing.
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Nnedi Okorafor’s Novel, “Who Fears Death,” Set In A Post-Apocalyptic Africa, Optioned, With Wanuri Kahiu To Direct

Mega props to professor/author Nnedi Okorafor, whom I’ve known since MySpace was The online social networking space to be, and where I was first introduced to her and her work… Nnedi’s third novel, Who Fears Death, a novel of the fantasy genre, set in an alternate, post-apocalyptic Saharan Africa, published just this year, has been optioned by producer Kisha Cameron-Dingle, the program director for Focus Features’ Africa First Film Program – a program we’ve covered a bit on this blog.

Cameron-Dingle also previously served as associate producer on Raoul Peck’s Sometimes in April and Spike Lee’s Bamboozled.

A team is already being assembled for the potential production, with the all-important director’s slot going to award-winning Kenyan filmmaker Wanuri Kahiu, writer and director of the short sci-fi film Pumzi, which received mucho coverage on this blog as well.

Now, obviously, an option doesn’t automatically mean an adaptation will happen.
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Completion cuts 'Razorwire' deal

Kisha Imani Cameron and her Completion Films banner have picked up Razorwire by newcomer Rob Davis, and attached music video director Little X to helm the urban horror movie. The script centers on a group of small-time drug dealers who discover that vampires, who also happen to be cops, have been feeding on the disadvantaged people in the ghetto. When the vampire cops start framing them for the murders, the dealers go to war with their new immortal enemies. "I'm not normally a big horror fan, but I know a great genre movie when I read one," said Cameron, who was an exec at New Line and Walden Media before striking out on her own. Cameron acted as associate producer on the 2000 Spike Lee movie Bamboozled and on the 2005 HBO telefilm Sometimes in April, about the Rwandan genocide.

Sometimes in April

Sometimes in April
BERLIN -- Sometimes in April takes on the Rwandan genocide of 1994 with a story that incorporates both the big picture and a drama about a specific family. Writer-director Raoul Peck, who told the story of the rise to power and assassination of a Congolese leader in Lumumba, has the disadvantage of coming late to the subject. Along with several books about the horrifying events that left upward of 1 million people dead, several documentaries and the Oscar-nominated film Hotel Rwanda already have brought Rwanda to the screen. Undoubtedly, there are many, many stories arising from these atrocities yet to be told. But Peck's generic approach, in which one fictional tale tries to encompass the entire tragedy, falls considerably short of the mark.

In the United States, the film will air on HBO, where many people who successfully have avoided any book or movie will get exposed to the story perhaps for the first time, so this might do much good. In territories where April will get released theatrically, the film might have less impact.

The story is split between two Aprils, in 2004 and 1994, and tells the experiences of Augustin Muganza (Idris Elba). Peck contrives the makeup of his family in such a way that he can include as many horror stories as possible. Thus, Augustin is a Hutu army officer, but his wife (Carole Karemera) is Tutsi. His brother Honore (Oris Erhuero) works at a radio station known as "hate radio" that broadcasts a call to arms for Hutus to slaughter Tutsis during the three-month carnage. And Augustin's girlfriend in 2004, Martine (Pamela Nomvete), teaches at a Catholic girls school in 1994, which one of his daughters attends.

In April 2004, during the national Day of Remembrance, Augustin receives a letter from Honore, asking Augustin to visit him in prison in Tanzania, where he is about to plead guilty at the International Criminal Tribunal. Martine urges him to go. Augustin reluctantly does so, and the movie moves back and forth between the two Aprils to fill us in on what happened to the family -- and the nation.

A third sequence takes place behind closed doors in Washington, where U.S. officials debate and temporize but do nothing to stop the massacre. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Prudence Bushnell (Debra Winger) argues for action but gets nowhere. The impression left by these scenes -- that blame for nonintervention lies solely with the U.S. government and not other U.N. member states, including European powers with genuine stakes in the region -- is simplistic and misleading.

The film captures the tensions and fears as chaos rages in the streets and includes more than enough sequences of mass murder to get across the point that madness gripped the entire nation. However, none of its characters is sufficiently developed so that an audience really can identify with him, which is what makes Hotel Rwanda so much more powerful. Dialogue often deteriorates into speeches, and characters habitually make geopolitical points.

This Berlinale has its share of movies about ethnic carnage, such as Amu, about the 1984 anti-Sikh riots in India, and Massacre, about the Christian militia's murder of Palestinian civilians in refugee camps in 1982. Such films need to be made and seen. But they usually hit home strongest when filmmakers are willing to put as much effort into drama and character as into political posturing.

SOMETIMES IN APRIL

HBO Films

Credits: Director-screenwriter: Raoul Peck; Producer: Daniel Delume; Executive producers: Raoul Peck, Joel Stillerman; Director of photography: Eric Guichard; Production designer: Benoit Barouh; Music: Bruno Coulais; Costume designer: Paule Mangenot; Editor: Jacques Comets. Cast: Augustin: Idris Elba; Prudence Bushnell: Debra Winger; Jeanne: Carole Karemera; Martine: Pamela Nomvete; Honore: Oris Erhuero; Xavier: Fraser James; Lionel: Noah Emmerich.

No MPAA rating, running time 140 minutes.

Berlin fest sets 21-film competition

Berlin fest sets 21-film competition
MUNICH -- Paul Weitz's In Good Company and Mike Mills' feature debut, Thumbsucker, are among the 21 films in competition at the Berlin International Film Festival, organizers said Thursday. The lineup also boasts 16 world premieres, five international debuts and several works by debutante film directors. Competition titles in the festival main section include the world premiere of Raoul Peck's ... Sometimes in April, starring Debra Winger; and Kakushi Ken-Oni no Tsume (The Hidden Blade), from Japanese director Yoji Yamada; Chinese director Tsai Ming-Liang's Tian bian yi duo yun (The Wayward Cloud), which mixes musical scenes with explicit sex; and Aleksandr Sokurov's Sonltse (The Sun), the third part of his trilogy on power.
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