A History of Violence
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 47 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


A History Of Violence: Did 1981 belong to Mad Max, Indiana Jones, or Snake Plissken?

28 July 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

With A History Of Violence, Tom Breihan picks the most important action movie of every year, starting with the genre’s birth and moving right up to whatever Vin Diesel’s doing this very minute.

1981 was a weirdly, historically great year for action movies, which means it’s a tough one for the purposes of this column. Because how am I supposed to pick? The year saw the release of three basically perfect action-movie masterpieces—all iconic, all vastly influential, all from some of the best directors ever to play around with the genre. Steven Spielberg’s Raiders Of The Lost Ark, the year’s biggest hit by far, remade action cinema into broad and accessible popular entertainment, giving it a fun and lighthearted tone without skimping on the violence, changing the perception of what these movies could do. George Miller’s The Road Warrior introduced the dusty punk-rock ...

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- Tom Breihan

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A History Of Violence: Ninjas get their big American break, with a little help from Chuck Norris

14 July 2016 10:00 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

With A History Of Violence, Tom Breihan picks the most important action movie of every year, starting with the genre’s birth and moving right up to whatever Vin Diesel’s doing this very minute.

The Octagon (1980)

There’s a scene in The Killer Elite, a not-great Sam Peckinpah movie from 1975, where Burt Young, the man who would go on to play Paulie in Rocky a year later, fights a ninja on the deck of a battleship. The ninja does not prove to be much of a problem for him. Young casually picks up the ninja and dumps him overboard. If the ninja even resists, we don’t see it. Instead, we see him go screaming into the water. And we see Young—squat, balding, portly, not exactly a physical wonder—leaning on the guardrail and watching him plunge. Then he makes this noise: “Hmp.” Like, “That was ...

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- Tom Breihan

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Win Passes To The Advance Screening Of Captain Fantastic

14 July 2016 6:22 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

From director Matt Ross (28 Rooms) comes the new comedy drama Captain Fantastic. Deep in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, isolated from society, a devoted father (Viggo Mortensen) dedicates his life to transforming his six young children into extraordinary adults. But when a tragedy strikes the family, they are forced to leave this self-created paradise and begin a journey into the outside world that challenges his idea of what it means to be a parent and brings into question everything he’s taught them.

The critics are loving Captain Fantastic!

Liz Braun at says The Toronto Sun says:

Captain Fantastic is an engaging character study about compromise, humility, letting go and love of family. It’s one of the best films you’ll see all year.”

Greg Wakeman at CineBlend raves:

Captain Fantastic touches upon thought-provoking themes in an entertaining, touching and funny fashion, while it’s effortlessly elevated by a captivating Viggo Mortensen. »

- Movie Geeks

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Female Led Movie Trigger Warning In Development At Thunder Road

24 June 2016 4:01 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Thunder Road – the production company that most recently delivered John Wick and Sicario – has snapped up a spec script written by Josh Olson (A History Of Violence) and John Brancato (Terminator: Salvation), titled Trigger Warning. The film is an original action tale with a female hero at its centre – and its development ensures the chance of women-oriented stories beyond the planned remakes and re-boots of male-led movies.

Little is known about the specific plot of Trigger Warning but, unsurprisingly, it is described in broad terms through comparison to well-known male-led movies. This is almost unavoidable, since the genre has historically been dominated by male-centric tales and so, Trigger Warning is characterised as a female Rambo: First Blood, with a dash of John Wick thrown in.

The significance of this project cannot be overstated. There has, for some time, been an increasingly vocal call for better female representation in leading roles in movies, »

- Sarah Myles

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Thunder Road Buys ‘Trigger Warning’ Spec: A Female John Wick?

23 June 2016 3:36 PM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Exclusive: We’ve got a female-driven Ghostbusters, and a female-driven Ocean’s Eleven from Gary Ross and Steven Soderbergh. Why not an action film with a female heroine who’s one part John Wick and one part Rambo? Thunder Road has closed a deal for Trigger Warning, a spec script by A History Of Violence scribe Josh Olson and Terminator: Rise of the Machines‘ John Brancato. The script is described as a female First Blood with John Wick thrown in for good measure, where the… »

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Dwight Yoakam Reunites With Billy Bob Thornton in New Drama 'Goliath'

15 June 2016 11:35 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Twenty years after their Oscar-winning Sling Blade, Dwight Yoakam and Billy Bob Thornton are pairing on screen again. The country icon is the newest addition to the cast of Goliath, a straight-to-series drama for Amazon Prime with Thornton in one of its lead roles.

Yoakam will play the leader of a huge aerospace company defended by the law firm at the center of Goliath. Thornton and fellow Hollywood legend William Hurt play two of the firm's partners in what's described as "the ultimate David vs. Goliath battle fought in the 21st century American legal system. »

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L.A. Film Festival Review: Lights Out

11 June 2016 4:55 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

About a year ago, I received a Facebook message from a friend of mine telling me I needed to watch a short that was making its rounds on the internet.  She sent me the link and told me to watch it with the lights out.  I wasn’t sure what to expect but figured no harm no foul.  I shut my lights off and hit play.  I wish I could say that I made it through the 3 minute short in one sitting, or that I even made it through the whole thing during the second viewing.  However, it took me 3 times to finally sit down and watch Lights Out from start to finish because I was so unnerved.  The story is simple – a woman is home alone and when she turns off the lights a shadowy figure stands in the hallway only to disappear when the lights turn on. The short was effective in terrifying the viewer and soon became a viral sensation online. When news broke that they would be making this short into a feature film, with the same director doing the feature and James Wan set to produce, I was ecstatic.

For those not familiar with the 2016 movie Lights Out, it centers around a family who has been haunted by a creature who can only appear when the lights are out.  The film is directed by David F. Sandberg (who also directed the 2013 short of the same name) and stars Teresa Palmer (Warm Bodies), Gabriel Bateman (Annabelle), Alexander Dipersia (I Am Legend) and Maria Bello (A History Of Violence).  The film starts off with a bang when we are introduced to Paul (Billy Burke), the husband of Sophie (Maria Bello), at his office inside a textile mill.  As the office closes for the evening, Paul’s assistant Esther (Lotta Losten – who was the main focus in the 2013 short), goes about shutting everything down for the evening which leads us to our first introduction of the shadowy figure.  As a side note, I loved that director David Sandberg did an homage to his short by using his wife as the main focus to meeting this creature.  After Esther leaves the office, Paul is left to face the creature one-on-one which results in horrifying consequences and brings us to the main focus of the story.

I wanted to love Lights Out, I really did.  There were moments that frightened me and made me jump but unfortunately what made the 2013 short so remarkable was lost in the feature film.  The passion and simplicity that is seen throughout the short was swept under the rug for a more mainstream and studio driven film.  Though I was disappointed, I didn’t outright dislike the film.  If there is something that Lights Out did well it was bring the subject of depression into the spotlight.  The protagonist’s mother, Sophie (Maria Bello), is suffering from severe depression and we see her journey through snippets of information from her past and her unraveling in the present.  I left the theater with a different view and interpretation of what the shadowy figure was and what it meant for each of the characters that it affected.  I wish more filmmakers were able to bring mental illness to the forefront in a creative way such as what David F. Sandberg did.

Though the story lacked what I was hoping for with the feature, the acting was solid.  Teresa Palmer stood her ground as a cross between a scream queen and a final girl – she was confident and strong and didn’t ooze desperation or neediness when it came to needing help from her male counterpart Bret (Alexander Dipersia).  Maria Bello was fantastic, though she usually is in everything that she does, and I felt myself really rooting for her character in the end.  However, the breakout role goes to Gabriel Bateman, who played the son Martin.  His character was one of the main focuses of the shadowy entity and Gabriel did a fantastic job of transforming his character from that of a terrified child to one of a brave and courageous mini-adult.

All in all, Lights Out had major potential.  Though it did fall flat in some areas, those who may not be familiar with the short, will enjoy what this film has to offer.  I think what is most important to remember for those of us who are fans of the short is that the feature film is not going to be a continuous of the short.  I went into this with high expectations but I think had I lowered those and went in with more of an open mind I would have enjoyed the film more.  Those who are easily scared (raises hand) will have fun with all the jump scares as well as the creepy and dark atmosphere.  Peppered throughout the film is some humor that lightens the mood and makes the experience of viewing the movie even more enjoyable.  Lights Out had its moments where I could see the director’s voice and passion shining through and it makes me excited to see what else he has in store for the horror genre in the future.

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- Shannon McGrew

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Dp Peter Suschitzky on The Empire Strikes Back, Collaborating with David Cronenberg and the New Wave’s “Boring Light”

9 June 2016 1:57 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

British cinematographer Peter Suschitzky is known for his collaborations with David Cronenberg (Cosmopolis, A Dangerous Method, Eastern Promises, A History of Violence, Spider, eXistenZ, Crash, Naked Lunch and Dead Ringers). His eclectic career saw him start working in fantastical “what if” tales on It Happened Here (1966) and Privilege (1967). He worked with Peter Watkins, Albert Finney, Peter Watkins, John Boorman, Ken Russell and Warris Hussein in Britain, before Hollywood came calling. is first trip to Cannes, working on Charlie Bubbles by Albert Finney, was cancelled after the festival was stopped by the May ’68 protests led by Jean Luc-Godard. This year, I met him at the […] »

- Kaleem Aftab

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Why superhero fatigue isn't necessarily the problem

8 June 2016 7:55 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Are there too many superhero movies? And are audiences getting bored?

Minor spoilers for X-Men: Apocalypse and Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice lie ahead

At the start of the year, it seemed that the big comic book movie hits were relatively easy to call. Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice, X-Men: Apocalypse and Captain America: Civil War were the safe bets (each, coincidentally, around the 150 minute mark, and major interchanges in their respective franchises/universes/whatever we're calling them). Deadpool would make a profit, given that its budget was modest. Suicide Squad looked more of a gamble, and Doctor Strange arguably moreso.

We're four films into the superhero-infested waters of blockbuster cinema this summer, and already, it feels as though things have changed just a little. Batman V Superman has fallen just short of $900m in worldwide box office takings, a disappointment against what was expected, »

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Hail, Caesar!,’ ‘Anomalisa,’ ‘Le Amiche,’ and More

7 June 2016 6:38 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson)

Charlie Kaufman, the writer behind Being John Malkovich and Adaptation, teams up with animator Duke Johnson to create a complex emotional drama starring lifelike puppets. The premise is riddled with existential dread of modern-day life, presented uniquely through Kaufman’s idiosyncratic point-of-view. For protagonist and self-help author Michael Stone (voiced soulfully by David Thewlis), everyone around him has the same voice (thanks to Tom Noonan) and nothing feels right. It isn’t »

- The Film Stage

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33 Photos That Prove Viggo Mortensen Is Everyone's Type

1 June 2016 10:05 AM, PDT | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

When it comes to men, I don't really have a "type," but I tend toward ruggedly handsome, and I'd never kick a set of chiseled cheekbones out of bed. Hence, my enduring crush on Viggo Mortensen. As far as I'm concerned, Viggo is everyone's type. The chameleon-like actor is devastatingly good-looking, but he resists being the leading man or "movie star." Instead, he chooses challenging roles in all sorts of movies, and he's not afraid to get naked for them. When asked about his penchant for nudity in a recent profile in Esquire, Viggo said he doesn't understand what the fuss is about: "It's just a penis. Every man has one." Over the years, we've seen him engage in a naked knife fight (Eastern Promises), perform cunnilingus on a woman dressed in a cheerleading uniform (A History of Violence), and make sweet, sweet love under a waterfall (A Walk on the Moon »

- Nancy Einhart

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Recommended Discs & Deals: Wim Wenders, ‘City of Women,’ ‘Horse Money,’ and More

31 May 2016 8:06 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

City of Women (Federico Fellini)

Federico Fellini‘s epic 1980 fantasia introduced the start of the Maestro’s delirious late period. A surrealist tour-de-force filmed on soundstages and locations alike, and overflowing with the same sensory (and sensual) invention heretofore found only in the classic movie-musicals (and Fellini’s own oeuvre), La città delle donne [City of Women] taps into the era’s restless youth culture, coalescing into nothing less than Fellini’s post-punk opus. Marcello Mastroianni appears as Fellini’s alter »

- The Film Stage

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Horror Highlights: New Chucky Doll, Wizard World & Crypt TV, Mondo’s Cronenberg Vinyls, Screamfest 2016, Shortwave

25 May 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Chucky’s back and better than ever… Mezco Toyz presents their newest Chucky doll based on his likeness in the first Child’s Play movie. Also: Wizard World and Crypt TV’s eight-city video showcase, Mondo’s Cronenberg vinyls, the Screamfest 2016 announcement, and over 10 photos from Shortwave.

Photos of Mezco Toyz’s New Chucky Doll: From Mezco Toyz: “Unlike the scarred and battle-damaged look Chucky normally bears (people have tried to destroy him in six films so far), this version represents the cleaner, earlier Chucky. His trademark outfit is un-slashed, his face is not yet mauled.

Just as he did in his films, Chucky has lots to say from his trademark “My name is Chucky” to far more sinister phrases.

The star of the Child’S Play films, Chucky stands fifteen inches tall and features real cloth Good Guys clothing, eleven points of articulation, his trademark orange hair and realistic glass-like eyes. »

- Tamika Jones

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Player,’ ‘Manhunter,’ ‘A Married Woman,’ and More

24 May 2016 8:28 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

A Married Woman (Jean-Luc Godard)

A Married Woman is an often overlooked masterwork from Godard’s most productive period. The plot appears to be simple: Charlotte (Macha Méril) is a young married woman having an affair with an actor. When she discovers that she is pregnant, she must decide which man is the father and which man she will stay with. In Godard’s hands, however, the film, described as a film about a woman’s beauty and the ugliness of her world, »

- The Film Stage

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Chris Bender Launches Good Fear Film + Management

23 May 2016 4:06 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A week after dissolving 18-year-old Benderspink, producer Chris Bender has launched his new shingle, Good Fear Film + Management.

Notable clients include “It Follows” director David Robert Mitchell and “Gleason” director Clay Tweel.

The new company will include Jake Weiner as a partner. Managers Jake Wagner, Daniel Vang, Scott Stoops and talent manager Ryan Revel will join Bender at the new company along with creative executives David Baggelaar and Matthew Reis.

Management clients of the new company include Jennifer Weiner (“In Her Shoes”), Allison Schroeder (“Hidden Figures”), Billy Brown (“How to Get Away with Murder”), Eddie Jemison (“Ocean’s Eleven,” “Hung”), Matt Gerald (Netflix’s “Daredevil”), Adam Busch (“Colony”) and Tiffany Dupont (“Murder in the First”).

Other clients include eight primary cast members from the Bravo series “Vanderpump Rules”: Jordan Ross (“Cruel Intentions”), Ashleigh Powell (“The Nutcracker and the Four Realms”), Victoria Aveyard (“Red Queen”), Evan Daugherty (“Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles »

- Dave McNary

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Great... Train Robbery, Detective, Balls of Fire

22 May 2016 6:01 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

1859 Arthur Conan Doyle is born. Probably rolls over in his grave 150 years later when Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes premieres and the great detective becomes a slo mo action hero

1868 The Great Train Robbery happens. It's the subject of a highly influential 10 minute silent film (embedded above) as soon as people figure out what to do with cameras and celluloid in 1903. Cross-cutting, breaking the fourth wall, inventing the western action movie genre? It's all happening right here. 

1907 Laurence Olivier is born. Not yet a "Sir" but already expecting a cooing audience

1945 Paranormal investigators Lorraine and Ed Warren are married. They become the fab Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson in The Conjuring (2013) and The Conjuring 2 (2016) 

1958 Jerry Lee Lewis tells the world he's married his 13 year old cousin Myra. Later they look just like Dennis Quaid and Winona Ryder in a movie

1967 Brooke Smith, »

- NATHANIEL R

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Benderspink Dissolving Production-Management Company After 18 Years

17 May 2016 2:48 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

JC Spink and Chris Bender are dissolving their 18-year-old management-production company Benderspink, which has been involved in “The Hangover” trilogy, “We’re the Millers,” “A History of Violence” and “Zombeavers.”

The duo said the split is amicable in a statement issued Tuesday: “We started Benderspink in our late 20s almost 18 years ago. We could not be more proud of what we’ve achieved together and are excited for this next chapter in each of our lives.”

The statement did not elaborate on what they will do next.

Spink focused mostly on management while Bender focused on producing. The company was formed in 1998 after the two had worked as assistants at Zide-Perry Productions, where Bender received a co-producing credit on “American Pie.”

The duo, who met at Bucknell University, had a long-time first-look deal through New Line that launched in 2001. They delivered mid-budget titles such as “Horrible Bosses” and “The Butterfly Effect” franchises, »

- Dave McNary

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘The Witch,’ ‘The Naked Island,’ ‘Inherent Vice,’ and More

17 May 2016 8:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Witch (Robert Eggers)

“We will conquer this wilderness. It will not consume us,” foreshadows our patriarch in the first act of The Witch, a delightfully insane bit of 17th century devilish fun. As if Ingmar Bergman and Ken Russell co-directed Kill ListRobert Eggers’ directorial debut follows a God-fearing Puritan family banished from their settlement in a colonial New England, only to have their deep sense of faith uprooted when our title character has her way with their fate. »

- TFS Staff

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Dakota Johnson Boards ‘Under the Silver Lake’ With Andrew Garfield

13 May 2016 7:31 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Dakota Johnson is joining Andrew Garfield in David Robert Mitchell‘s crime thriller “Under the Silver Lake.” On Thursday, it was announced that A24 has acquired the domestic rights, and production will begin in Los Angeles this summer. The noir crime thriller set in L.A. is writer-director Mitchell‘s follow-up to his critically acclaimed indie horror film “It Follows,” which premiered at Cannes in 2014. Also Read: Andrew Garfield's 'Under the Silver Lake' Picked Up by A24 Michael De Luca (“The Social Network,” “Moneyball,” “50 Shades of Grey” trilogy) is producing. Chris Bender and Jake Weiner (“A History of Violence »

- Beatrice Verhoeven

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Andrew Garfield’s ‘Under the Silver Lake’ Picked Up by A24

12 May 2016 11:54 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

A24 has acquired the U.S. rights to the Andrew Garfield thriller “Under the Silver Lake,” TheWrap has learned. The noir crime thriller set in Los Angeles is the writer-director David Robert Mitchell‘s follow-up to his critically acclaimed indie horror film “It Follows.” Michael De Luca (“The Social Network,” “Moneyball,” “50 Shades of Grey” trilogy) is producing, with filming scheduled to start at the end of this summer. Also Read: Andrew Garfield to Star in 'It Follows' Director's Crime Thriller 'Under the Silver Lake' Chris Bender and Jake Weiner (“A History of Violence”) and Adele Romanski (“Black Rock”) are also producing. »

- Meriah Doty

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 47 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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