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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Todd Boyd ...
Himself - Professor: Critical Studies, USC (as Dr. Todd Boyd)
Marvin Goux ...
Himself - USC Assistant Coach, 1957-1982 (as Marv Goux)
Brad Pye Jr. ...
Himself - Sports Editor: L.A. Sentinel, 1955-1983
John McKay ...
Himself - USC Head Coach, 1960-1975
Lou Cannon ...
Himself - Former L.A. Bureau Chief: Washington Post
Jim Lampley ...
Himself - Sportscaster: ABC Sports, 1974-1987
Harry Edwards ...
Himself - Founder: Black Student Organization (as Dr. Harry Edwards)
...
Himself - Hall of Fame Running Back
Kimberle Crenshaw ...
Herself - Law Professor: UCLA and Columbia University
Byron Lewis ...
Himself - Chairman and CEO: The Uniworld Group, Inc.
Jerry Burgdoerfer ...
Himself - Fmr. Exec. V.P. Marketing: Hertz Corportation
Larry Felser ...
Himself - Sportswriter: Buffalo News, 1963-2001
Reggie McKenzie ...
Himself - Buffalo Bills, 1972-1982
...
Himself - Hall of Fame Running Back
James Baker ...
Himself - Fmr. Sportswriter: Buffalo Courier-Express
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Documentary

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Release Date:

12 November 2002 (USA)  »

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User Reviews

 
Chilling, yet excellent
19 December 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

HBO provides, without a doubt, some of the best sports documentaries around today. OJ, a Study in black and White, is one of the. As much about the separation of race that exist today, as it is about the case in and of it's self, It also was a great document on how OJ was on top for so long, only to see it fade after his career ended in sad fashion with an absolute horrid San Fransico 49ers team. The show doesn't ask you to judge OJ, nor does it ask you to feel sorry for him. It is one of the best examination on one of the most memorable trails of the late 20th century. Some say his fame bought his freedom, (much like fame would Baltimore Ravens Linebacker Ray Lewis, who was a witness and a participant in a murder that occurred at Super Bowl party, where as OJ was physically seen at the crime, Lewis was both seen at the crime, and reported to have been heard by dozens to have given to death order) The documentary reminded me of that day sitting in creative writing class that day at college, watching the verdict on live TV. It takes powerful film making to bring one back to a certain point, and it makes a powerful moment for one to remember exactly where they were when it happened. One true must for anyone who wishes to see a documentary on OJ Simpson, without his guilt or innocence being forced.


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