The King (2005) - News Poster

(2005)

News

The Mercy: first trailer for Colin Firth & Rachel Weisz's latest

Simon Brew Nov 17, 2017

From the director of The Theory Of Everything comes The Mercy. Here's the first trailer...

Heading into UK cinemas on February 9th 2018 is The Mercy, the new film from The Theory Of Everything director James Marsh. Colin Firth and Rachel Weisz headline this one, and we've got the first trailer and an official synopsis to bring to you.

We'd best get down to work, then. Trailer first...

And here's the synopsis...

Following his Academy Award® winning film The Theory of Everything, James Marsh directs the incredible true story of Donald Crowhurst (Colin Firth, The King’s Speech, Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Railway Man), an amateur sailor who competed in the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in the hope of becoming the first person in history to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping. With an unfinished boat and his business and house on the line, Donald leaves his wife,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Watch The First Trailer For ‘The Mercy’, Starring Colin Firth & Rachel Weisz

Studiocanal has released the very first trailer for the upcoming The Mercy, which will roll into cinemas next year.

Following his Academy Award® winning film The Theory of Everything, James Marsh directs the incredible true story of Donald Crowhurst (Colin Firth, The King’s Speech, Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Railway Man), an amateur sailor who competed in the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in the hope of becoming the first person in history to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping. With an unfinished boat and his business and house on the line, Donald leaves his wife, Clare (Rachel Weitz, The Light Between Oceans, The Lobster) and their children behind, hesitantly embarking on an adventure on his boat the Teignmouth Electron.

Co-starring David Thewlis (Anomalisa, The Theory of Everything) and Ken Stott (‘War & Peace’, The Hobbit), and produced by Blueprint Pictures (The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, In Bruges), the story
See full article at The Hollywood News »

First poster and trailer for The Mercy starring Colin Firth and Rachel Weisz

The first poster and trailer have debuted for the upcoming drama The Mercy. Directed by James Marsh, the film is based on the true story of Donald Crowhurst’s disastrous attempt to become the first person in history to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping while competing in the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race. Colin Firth stars in the lead role as the amatuer sailor alongside Rachel Weisz, David Thewlis, and Ken Stott; take a look at the poster and trailer below, along with the official synopsis and some first look images…

Following his Academy Award® winning film The Theory of Everything, James Marsh directs the incredible true story of Donald Crowhurst (Colin Firth, The King’s Speech, Kingsman: The Secret Service, The Railway Man), an amateur sailor who competed in the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in the hope of becoming the first person in history to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Fall of Harvey Weinstein: From Indie Powerhouse to Hollywood Pariah

The Fall of Harvey Weinstein: From Indie Powerhouse to Hollywood Pariah
Over the course of five days, Harvey Weinstein went from a powerhouse player to a Hollywood pariah. His career is in tatters, and the company he co-founded has been wrested from his control following the Oct. 5 publication of a New York Times exposé featuring multiple on-the-record interviews with women accusing him of sexual harassment that occurred over three decades.

Arguably, no one did more to shape the world of indie film in the 1990s and early aughts than Weinstein. With a combination of sterling creative taste and a pugilist’s instinct for going for the jugular, he helped push edgy or emotionally potent films such as “The Crying Game,” “Pulp Fiction” and “The King’s Speech” into the mainstream, while fashioning himself into a mogul. That legacy has been tarnished. Weinstein now sits in ignominious company alongside Bill O’Reilly, Roger Ailes, L.A. Reid and Bill Cosby — a symbol of a casting couch culture that is being
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Midway Oscars Forecast: A Cluttered Landscape for Indies and Streamers

Midway Oscars Forecast: A Cluttered Landscape for Indies and Streamers
It was barely four months ago that director Barry Jenkins stood alongside the baffled cast and crew of “Moonlight” at the Dolby Theatre after defying virtually every known Oscar convention in spectacular, immortal fashion. But just eight short weeks from now, the season will purr right back to life at the Venice and Telluride film festivals. Hollywood will set its sights on that coveted gold statuette for the 90th time, and a new flock of prestige productions will vie for the industry’s top honor.

New York-based distributor A24’s victory brought the best picture tally for independents (and studio dependents) up to nine over the past decade. The only major studio to score in that stretch was Warner Bros. with “Argo,” as the game of Oscar continues to be one of bolstering the financial outlook of artistic risks that conglomerate-tethered companies feel they can’t afford. A glance at the horizon this year reveals a healthy
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A Brief History of Casting Talent Over Resemblance for Biopics

How important is resemblance, really?

As we mentioned in our newsletter yesterday, Christian Bale is reportedly in talks to star as former vice president Dick Cheney in an Adam McKay helmed biopic, alongside Amy Adams as Lynne Cheney and Steve Carrell as Donald Rumsfeld. The news, broken by Variety, has lead to a host of reactions across the internet, including a number of Dark Knight and American Psycho related jokes because, you know, duh. Front and center in many of these reactions is speculation (though in some cases, anticipatory salivation might be more accurate) over how Bale will transform for the role.

After all, Christian Bale is known for physical metamorphoses that rank just below those of caterpillars on an impressiveness scale; he famously lost 60 pounds for his role in The Machinist (bringing the 6' actor to a skeletal 120-ish pounds), and afterwards went directly to Batman Begins, eating and weight-lifting his way to 220 pounds, which
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Chuck Berry Dead at 90: Watch Scenes With His Music in ‘Pulp Fiction’ and ‘Back to the Future’

  • Indiewire
Chuck Berry Dead at 90: Watch Scenes With His Music in ‘Pulp Fiction’ and ‘Back to the Future’
Chuck Berry passed away on March 18 in Missouri, Variety reports. The 90-year-old guitarist was a cornerstone of rock and roll music, with energetic hits from the ’50s such as “Maybellene” and “Roll Over Beethoven.” He is also credited with perfecting onstage swagger, posing with his guitar and rocking out in a way that heavily influenced countless bands, from The Rolling Stones to Bruce Springsteen and beyond. Outside of effectively creating rock music, Berry also had a defining impact on the film industry, soundtracking two of cinema’s most iconic scenes and influencing scores of filmmakers and actors.

Read More: Bill Paxton Dead at 61: Emmy-Winning ‘Big Love’ and ‘Titanic’ Actor Passes Away From Surgical Complications

Quentin Tarantino famously used “You Can Never Tell” during the Vincent and Mia dance scene in “Pulp Fiction:”

But even that cultural touchstone is eclipsed by Marty McFly’s cover of “Johnny B. Goode
See full article at Indiewire »

The Weinstein Company 2017 Release Calendar: Here’s the Oscar Hopefuls, and the Damaged Goods

The Weinstein Company 2017 Release Calendar: Here’s the Oscar Hopefuls, and the Damaged Goods
May 2015 was the last time Harvey Weinstein hosted a Cannes presentation at the Majestic Hotel. Among the titles was a preview of Justin Chadwick’s “Tulip Fever,” with the then white-hot Swedish actress Alicia Vikander on hand. A romantic triangle period piece costarring Christoph Waltz and Dane DeHaan, Weinstein later pushed the release from July 2016 to February 2017. Now, two years later, it’s booked for August 25 — the dog days of summer.

Last year, the Weinstein Co. had so few bonafide Oscar contenders on the docket that they didn’t mount their usual Cannes show-and-tell at all. Garth Davis’s “Lion” did yield six nominations and, like critics’ darling “Carol” the year before, no wins. The lengthy awards season did pay off for “Lion” at the box office; it’s made $103 million worldwide. However, it also represents a rare tick in the ‘win’ column for TWC, which is struggling to maneuver in these challenging times.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The Weinstein Company 2017 Release Calendar: Here’s the Hopefuls, and the Damaged Goods

  • Indiewire
The Weinstein Company 2017 Release Calendar: Here’s the Hopefuls, and the Damaged Goods
May 2015 was the last time Harvey Weinstein hosted a Cannes presentation at the Majestic Hotel. Among the titles was a preview of Justin Chadwick’s “Tulip Fever,” with the then white-hot Swedish actress Alicia Vikander on hand. A romantic triangle period piece costarring Christoph Waltz and Dane DeHaan, Weinstein later pushed the release from July 2016 to February 2017. Now, two years later, it’s booked for August 25 — the dog days of summer.

Last year, the Weinstein Co. had so few bonafide Oscar contenders on the docket that they didn’t mount their usual Cannes show-and-tell at all. Garth Davis’s “Lion” did yield six nominations and, like critics’ darling “Carol” the year before, no wins. The lengthy awards season did pay off for “Lion” at the box office; it’s made $103 million worldwide. However, it also represents a rare tick in the ‘win’ column for TWC, which is struggling to maneuver in these challenging times.
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars: Nine Films Advance in Foreign-Language Race

Oscars: Nine Films Advance in Foreign-Language Race
Nine features will advance to the next round of voting in the foreign-language film category for the 89th Academy Awards.

The shortlisted films, selected from a record 85 submissions, are:

Australia, “Tanna” — directors Bentley Dean, Martin Butler

Canada, “It’s Only the End of the World” — director Xavier Dolan

Denmark, “Land of Mine” — director Martin Zandvliet

Germany, “Toni Erdmann” — director Maren Ade

Iran, “The Salesman” — director Asghar Farhadi

Norway, “The King’s Choice” — director Erik Poppe

Russia, “Paradise” — director Andrei Konchalovsky

Sweden, “A Man Called Ove” — director Hannes Holm

Switzerland, “My Life as a Zucchini” — director Claude Barras

Toni Erdmann” scored a clean sweep at the European Film Awards on Dec. 10, winning in each of its categories: Best European Film, Director, Actor (Peter Simonischek), Actress (Sandra Huller) and Screenplay.

Dolan’s family drama “It’s Only the End of the World,” won the Cannes Grand Prix this year. Farhadi’s “The Salesman,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Campaign Begins: Inside the First Weekend Push to Woo Academy Voters with Food, Swag, and Celebs

The Campaign Begins: Inside the First Weekend Push to Woo Academy Voters with Food, Swag, and Celebs
Truth is, while there are about 6,000 voting Academy members, it can take only 300 or so Oscar votes to get a movie nominated. Hence all the relentless campaigning, which is in full gear, as distributors, foreign countries, and Oscar-whisperers plan and execute relentless rounds of screenings with public appearances — at lunches, Q&A panels, premieres, DVD launch parties, and “holiday” fetes.

Check out this slice of the past few days to get a sense of all the wining and dining that goes on. Academy members are being constantly wooed, just like the Hollywood Foreign Press Association who vote on the Golden Globes, with yummy food, drink, music, and celebrities —despite various attempts by the Academy to monitor and limit the scale of all this campaigning.

On the animation side, for example, this past week saw a Friday Academy screening of Universal/Illumination’s animated contest musical “Sing,” directed by live-action director
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The Campaign Begins: Inside the First Weekend Push to Woo Academy Voters with Food, Swag, and Celebs

  • Indiewire
The Campaign Begins: Inside the First Weekend Push to Woo Academy Voters with Food, Swag, and Celebs
Truth is, while there are about 6,000 voting Academy members, it can take only 300 or so Oscar votes to get a movie nominated. Hence all the relentless campaigning, which is in full gear, as distributors, foreign countries, and Oscar-whisperers plan and execute relentless rounds of screenings with public appearances — at lunches, Q&A panels, premieres, DVD launch parties, and “holiday” fetes.

Check out this slice of the past few days to get a sense of all the wining and dining that goes on. Academy members are being constantly wooed, just like the Hollywood Foreign Press Association who vote on the Golden Globes, with yummy food, drink, music, and celebrities —despite various attempts by the Academy to monitor and limit the scale of all this campaigning.

On the animation side, for example, this past week saw a Friday Academy screening of Universal/Illumination’s animated contest musical “Sing,” directed by live-action director
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Monster’s Ball’ Scribe Milo Addica Inks With Apa

  • Deadline
‘Monster’s Ball’ Scribe Milo Addica Inks With Apa
Exclusive: Writer-director Milo Addica, who earned an Oscar nomination for co-writing the Halle Berry movie Monster’s Ball that won her the Academy Award, has signed with Apa. He’s next up directing his original screenplay Open Space, being produced by Dean Nichols. Addica’s writing credits include the 2003 Nicole Kidman starrer Birth and James Marsh's The King in 2005 with Gael Garcia Bernal and Paul Dano. Addica continues to be repped by manager Oren Segal and attorneys…
See full article at Deadline »

‘Desierto’ Review: Donald Trump’s Campaign Makes This Violent Thriller More Engaging Than It Looks

  • Indiewire
‘Desierto’ Review: Donald Trump’s Campaign Makes This Violent Thriller More Engaging Than It Looks
Give “Desierto” credit for this: There has never been a more appropriate time for a tense thriller about Mexican immigrants avoiding the murderous advances of a gun-wielding American lunatic. Released a little over a year after Donald Trump labeled the majority of undocumented Mexicans living in the U.S. as drug-dealing rapists in the same breath as announcing his presidency, the first feature from director Jonas Cuarón (the son of “Gravity” director Alfonso, with whom the younger Cuarón wrote the screenplay) doesn’t deliver much in the way of ingenuity. But it’s baked in a topical kind of dread.

Desierto” takes the form of a minimalist B-movie, spending only a modicum of time setting up the premise before settling into the prolonged cat-and-mouth dynamic that dominates the story. After a handful of Mexicans assemble on the outskirts of the U.S. border, surrounded by barren desert, their transit hits
See full article at Indiewire »

2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Foreign Language Film

2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Foreign Language Film
The official submissions for the foreign language Oscar are in from around the world, and the Academy has deemed a record 85 eligible to compete. Last year, 81 submissions were released theatrically in their home countries between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015. (This year’s deadline for submissions was October 3, 2016.)

Several Academy foreign committees comprised of members from all the branches will whittle down the films to a shortlist of nine and finally, five Oscar nominees. (Last year’s winner was Cannes prize-winner “Son of Saul,” directed by Hungarian Lazlo Nemes.) Many countries pick films that do well on the festival circuit as their strongest Oscar contender; others do not.

Politics often intervene: Brazil’s submission was expected to be Cannes competition film “Aquarius,” starring Sonia Braga, but it was embroiled in controversy over filmmaker Kleber Mendonça Filho’s support of outgoing impeached president Dilma Rousseff. Bruno Barreto’s Brazil selection committee went
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Foreign Language Film

  • Indiewire
2017 Oscar Predictions: Best Foreign Language Film
The official submissions for the foreign language Oscar are in from around the world, and the Academy has deemed a record 85 eligible to compete. Last year, 81 submissions were released theatrically in their home countries between October 1, 2014 and September 30, 2015. (This year’s deadline for submissions was October 3, 2016.)

Several Academy foreign committees comprised of members from all the branches will whittle down the films to a shortlist of nine and finally, five Oscar nominees. (Last year’s winner was Cannes prize-winner “Son of Saul,” directed by Hungarian Lazlo Nemes.) Many countries pick films that do well on the festival circuit as their strongest Oscar contender; others do not.

Politics often intervene: Brazil’s submission was expected to be Cannes competition film “Aquarius,” starring Sonia Braga, but it was embroiled in controversy over filmmaker Kleber Mendonça Filho’s support of outgoing impeached president Dilma Rousseff. Bruno Barreto’s Brazil selection committee went
See full article at Indiewire »

"Land of Mine" to compete for Foreign Oscar. (Plus Chart Updates)

Though I just gushed love all over Thomas Vinterberg's Oscar submission finalist The Commune yesterday, today brings news that Denmark went with another title for their submission. The committee unanimously chose Land of Mine, a World War II drama. The film looks at a little told story about German POWs in Denmark forced to dig up land mines. The film will be released in the Us by Sony Pictures Classics, dates Tba. It's worth noting that the film is also up for the Nordic Film Prize on November 1st, a prize which has other Oscar submission finalists in the running:

Nordic Council Film Prize Nominees

The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki (Finland's Oscar submission)

The Here After (Sweden - Reviewed last year at Tiff)

Land of Mine (Denmark's Oscar submission)

Louder Than Bombs (Norway's English Language Joachim von Trier film)

Sparrows (Iceland's Oscar submission finalist
See full article at FilmExperience »

Telluride Film Festival: These 7 Films Could Change the Awards Conversation

Telluride Film Festival: These 7 Films Could Change the Awards Conversation
It’s as reliable as a compass: Every year, on the Thursday before Labor Day, the Telluride charter from Los Angeles to Montrose, Colo. is a core sample of hopes for the Oscar season. (The contenders on my flight included executives from Amazon, Netflix, The Orchard, Open Road, Paramount, Plan B, and Fox Searchlight, along with movie stars Rooney Mara and Isabelle Huppert.)

It’s an honor to be selected for Telluride, certainly, but everyone’s nerves are tuned for the films’ receptions. The Labor Day weekend festival has launched a number of eventual best-picture winners, including “Slumdog Millionaire,” “The King’s Speech,” “Spotlight,” “Argo,” and “12 Years a Slave.” The buzz that begins here (or doesn’t) determines strategies as the films move on to future festivals in Toronto and New York.

1. “La La Land” (December 2, Lionsgate) opened the Venice Film Festival and will continue to Toronto. Reviews were upbeat
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Telluride Film Festival: These 7 Films Could Change the Awards Conversation

  • Indiewire
Telluride Film Festival: These 7 Films Could Change the Awards Conversation
It’s as reliable as a compass: Every year, on the Thursday before Labor Day, the Telluride charter from Los Angeles to Montrose, Colo. is a core sample of hopes for the Oscar season. (The contenders on my flight included executives from Amazon, Netflix, The Orchard, Open Road, Paramount, Plan B, and Fox Searchlight, along with movie stars Rooney Mara and Isabelle Huppert.)

It’s an honor to be selected for Telluride, certainly, but everyone’s nerves are tuned for the films’ receptions. The Labor Day weekend festival has launched a number of eventual best-picture winners, including “Slumdog Millionaire,” “The King’s Speech,” “Spotlight,” “Argo,” and “12 Years a Slave.” The buzz that begins here (or doesn’t) determines strategies as the films move on to future festivals in Toronto and New York.

1. “La La Land” (December 2, Lionsgate) opened the Venice Film Festival and will continue to Toronto. Reviews were upbeat
See full article at Indiewire »

Ronald Reagan Biopic Finds Director (Exclusive)

Ronald Reagan Biopic Finds Director (Exclusive)
A biopic of Ronald Reagan that will take him from teenager to his presidency has found its director in Sean McNamara, who helmed 2011's Soul Surfer and recently finished The King’s Daughter with Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt. The independent movie, dubbed Reagan, is written by Howie Klausner, who wrote Space Cowboys for Clint Eastwood in 2000. The filmmakers have yet to cast President Reagan, but as a young man he’ll be played by David Henrie, best known as the Disney Channel star of Wizards of Waverly Place opposite Selena Gomez. Robert Davi, best known for his work in Goonies,

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites