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Meet the Robinsons (2007) Poster

Trivia

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A picture of Walt Disney is seen in the orphanage.
The part of Lewis and Wilbur had to be recast when the original actor's voice broke.
The character of Lewis was voiced by both Daniel Hansen and Jordan Fry. Daniel Hansen voiced Lewis at the beginning of the film's production, and when Lewis needed things changed, they had Jordan Fry re-dub some segments. It is noticeable in some parts of the movie.
Walt Disney Feature Animation wanted to assert themselves as being separate from Pixar, renaming themselves "Walt Disney Animation Studios." This is the first film to show the new Walt Disney Animation Studios animated logo, which incorporates several seconds from Steamboat Willie (1928), the first Mickey Mouse cartoon to feature sound.
At one point, Lewis mockingly refers to Wilbur as "Captain Timetravel". This is evidently an actual superhero character in Lewis' time, since this character appears on the lunch box he uses for the control panel of the memory scanner. The graphic even resembles a muscular, caped version of Wilbur.
One of the pictures on Lewis' wall in his room in the orphanage is of Nikola Tesla.
Based on a book called "A Day With Wilbur Robinson".
The science fair that Wilbur attends is held at Joyce Williams Elementary school. This is a nod to the author of the original story, William Joyce.
When Wilbur's dad is talking to Lewis, he uses the Disney Point to point at Lewis. (Disney Point: a two fingered point rather than one).
This actually started life as a live action project.
Jim Carrey had a choice of voicing the Bowler Hat Guy or play Walter Sparrow in the film The Number 23 (2007) later the same year, he chose the latter.
During the production of Meet the Robinsons (2007), director Stephen J. Anderson acquired a new boss in the form of John Lasseter who became chief creative officer for both Disney and Pixar. One of Lasseter's first comments on seeing an early cut of the film was that the villain wasn't scary enough.
In the 3D version of the film, the final credits are all in 2D except for the names of the people who converted it to 3D.
The "Todayland" park is a tribute to the original "Tomorrowland", the futuristic section of the Disney theme parks. Immediately visible are Space Mountain and the original Rocket Jets.
After reading the screenplay, director Stephen J. Anderson actively lobbied to direct this movie. As a child of adoption himself, Anderson personally experienced many of the emotions (questions about belonging, being wanted, etc) that Lewis expresses in the film. [source: director's DVD commentary]
Four years in production.
After a test screening for John Lasseter, chief creative officer of animation at Disney, he suggested a lot of changes to director Stephen J. Anderson. In the next 10 months prior to the release, nearly 60 percent of the movie was re-shot (or re-rendered), adding new story elements and action scenes as well as a diabolic sidekick.
Wilbur travels from 2007 to the year 2037, a thirty year period. This could be a reference to Tomorrowland at Disneyland, which was originally the idea of what 1985 would look like from the perspective of 1955, when the park originally opened. There is also a reference to this on a sign that says "Todayland" when Wilbur first arrives to the future. On a similar note, another Disney film, Tomorrowland (2015) was released in 2015, 30 years after when Tomorrowland at Disneyland was suppose to be set.
After the agreement with Pixar expired, Disney formed the new Walt Disney Animation Studios, of which this is the first film.
Of the animated films released in 2007, this was the fourth highest grossing, after Ratatouille (2007), Shrek the Third (2007) and The Simpsons Movie (2007).
An unusual bonus on the DVD is an optional audio track that features *only* the sound effects (no dialogue or music), in 5.1 surround.
Hidden Mickey: 1) on the music stand sheets when Lewis meets Franny. 2) The cover of Gaston's stopwatch, upside-down.
The squiggly lines on the central monitor in Lewis' design drawings of the Brain Scanner spell out the word 'Mom'.
The 47th Disney animated feature.
The dinosaur mascot for the baseball team that Goob plays for is a homage to 'Dinosaur Bob and his Adventures with the Family Lazardo' by William Joyce - who wrote the book from which Meet the Robinsons is based.
Doris' name is taken from DOR-15, which is the number of the chamber that she is placed into in the rejected inventions room at Robinson Industries.
Characters from the film (Frankie the frog and his band playing "I Heard it Through the Grapevine") were used in an anti-cell-phone commercial to encourage movie audiences to turn their cell phones off and behave appropriately.
The Robinsons' topiary garden is inspired by Walt Disney World. Large, intricate topiaries (generally of Mickey and other easily recognizable characters) have long been a staple of Disney World. Also, the Robinsons' garden features colored circular "bounce" pads; during the scenes where the characters bounce on these, they bounce in the same way as the "jumping" fountains outside the Imagination! pavilion at Epcot (which also jump from colored circles).
The plaque on the 6th Street Orphanage at the beginning of the movie reads: "Established in 1855 the 6th Street Orphanage moved to it's current location in 1892. Founded by the nuns of the 6th Street Parish during the cholera outbreak of 1850 that left so many young people without homes or families. It has continued operating uninterrupted since then."
In a scene, we find the camera cutting to zoomed-up images of the Robinson family portraits, which appear to be hand-painted. In many of those shots the signature 'Ruppel 2005' can be found, referring to Robh Ruppel, who was the Art Director of the film and was part of the Art Department in past Disney films.
The year the film takes place in the future is 2037. This year was also used in the movie The Time Machine (2002) as the year in which the world ended due to the moon breaking up.
In the science fair scene near the beginning of the movie, there is a presentation on 3-D in movies, "Fad or Favorite". The movie itself was shown in 3-D in select theaters.
Unlike Chicken Little (2005), which was filmed in 2D and then enhanced to 3D, this was shot from the outset as a 3D feature.
Certain elements that were removed in earlier story treatments and cuts of the film were reintroduced in the final shot of Lewis' workshop. One outstanding element is the anti-gravity boots, which can be seen to the right of the unfinished Carl the Robot, which Lewis used in a fight with Doris in an early storyboard.
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Prior to the film, theaters showing the film in Disney Digital 3-D (RealD) show the Chip and Dale short Working for Peanuts (1953) (which is also projected in 3-D), while theaters showing the standard version show the Mickey Mouse short Boat Builders (1938).
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The film played theatrically on over 600 REAL D digital 3D screens.
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Director Stephen J. Anderson and actor Ethan Sandler voiced a significant amount of the cast between them. Many of these characters interact, consequently, the two spent much time in voice-over sessions together.
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As of January 2016, this is and Chicken Little (2005) are the only Computer Animated Disney Animated Feature Films that are Rated G. All other Computer Animated Disney Films to date are Rated PG.
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Doris' first test subject is modeled after Stan Laurel of the Laurel and Hardy comedy duo, whose distinctive attire included bowler hats.
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First Disney Animated Feature Film to use the New Computer Animated Disney Logo that was introduced the Previous Year in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (2006).
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In a trailer for the Blu-Ray and DVD release of the film, Wilbur Robinson's voice is much different than what is heard in the film.
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First Walt Disney animation film not to be released on VHS.
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The Brain Scanner on the "Brain Scanners from Mars" poster on the building next to the orphanage looks almost exactly like Doris the Hat.
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Carl's Voice Actor Harland Williams also voiced a robot in 20th Century Fox's Robots (2005), an animated film that's about Robots taking care of themselves without humans.
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The reporter voiced by Joe Whyte at the end of the movie looking for "a story for the local paper" is the same animation as Derek in the Dreamworks animated film Monsters vs. Aliens (2009) 2 years later.
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When first arriving at 'Todayland', Space Mountain, an attraction from every Disney park, can be seen on the right side.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

When Wilbur is revealing his family, he says his dad (who is not pictured to hide the fact that he's Lewis 30 Years Older) looks like Tom Selleck. Tom Selleck indeed provides the voice for Wilbur's Dad.

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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