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5 out of 5 people found the following review useful:

not really as comprehensive as I would have liked

7/10
Author: movieman_kev from United States
26 August 2005

This documentary can be found on the fourth disk on the Complete Adventures of Indiana Jones box set and is split into three segments, each having to do with each of the three movies, the most interesting segment is the first part as it's the most informative, not to say that the other two segments are not, but the second segment features way too much apologizing for "Temple of Doom", listen that movie is great and there's no reason to apologize for it in the least, the third segment on "the Last Crusade" is pretty interesting and all, but they leave out some stuff that I would have loved to hear more about in all three segments such as the Barbera Streisand incident, and some others. But what we do get is still pretty cool I enjoyed seeing some Indy auditions and the interviews were OK, and it was nice to see how stuff came together, but it just could've been more.

My Grade: B-

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3 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

Good thing they split it three ways

8/10
Author: Chip_douglas from Rijswijk, ZH, Netherlands
23 July 2005

Each of the Indiana Jones films gets a brand new documentary and nobody mentions the Young Indy Chronicles (which belongs in a museum). There is a great emphasis on the fact that these kind of movies will never be made this way again now that every effect can be done by computer. Note that everybody involved echoes this sentiment except the executive producer. Naturaly the first part reveals the origins of Raiders of the lost ark. The Tom Selleck story even including his screen-test with Sean Young. Alfred Molina is worth mentioning, as he has the most fun recounting his film debut. Meanwhile Harrison Ford looks as if he has had hair implants or something. This must be the first time the famous anecdote about how the Arab sword fight was cut short is left out. Instead we get an even more disgusting story by John Rhys-Davies featuring the only glimpse of a deleted scene on the entire DVD set. There are more snippets of behind the scenes footage, but unfortunately most of them turn out rather embarrassing (Spielberg bothering Indy with a Micky Mouse voice). On the up side, we finally get to see where Artoo and Threepio are hidden amongst the hieroglyphics.

When Willard Huyk and Gloria Katz were asked to work on the Temple of Doom, they were handed a lot of leftover scenes that never make it into the previous film and an order to name every character after a major crew members' pet. Kate Capshaw now claims to have been a serious art house actress before meeting Spiel, but her IMDb credits reveal no such thing. What is blatantly obvious was Stevens infatuation with her: they never stopped flirting on set. Chatter Lal talks more about other pictures on his resume than Temple, while the grown up Short Round still has his speech impediment. Enough time has past to be able to talk about Harrison's torn shoulder muscles, followed by a lot of tiresome apologizing for the fact that this one was "so much darker" and "not as much fun" as Raiders. It is also made clear that Frank Marschall was more like an errant boy than a producer, always getting nasty assignments like bug handling.

After all that complaining about the lack of lightness in the second film, everybody brightens up discussing The Last Crusade. Old footage only shows them fooling around on set (quite a difference compared to Star Wars). Sean Connery tells about the input he had on his character: making him less Yoda and more Sean. There are 1988 interviews with River Phoenix and Denholm Elliott with GREAT BIG DATES IN THE SUBTITLES so nobody would think these people are still alive. By this time they were running out of creepy crawlies and had to breed disease free rats themselves (as well as mechanical ones to set on fire). It is also revealed most of the Nazi uniforms were the genuine article, but the seagulls on the beach had to be played by doves. Spielberg spends a lot of time explaining the last ten minutes of the picture, yet fails to explain how that poor ancient knight felt when realizing he guarded the grail all those centuries for nothing. Neither do they mention that either Harrison's head got bigger over the course of three pictures or his hat decidedly smaller.

8 out of 10

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A Fun In-Look Behind Indiana Jones (SPOILERS)

9/10
Author: I_Am_The_Taylrus from Minnesota
27 April 2007

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

SPOILERS

I just did a very long comment so right now I am going to do a shorter one. I was lucky enough to get the four-disc Indiana Jones set and this was a feature on the fourth disc. Some scenes drag on, but this is one fun documentary, just be prepared for three hours worth of material. My favorite segment is the segment for Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, being as that is more fun and tells you some very interesting little experiences that the crew had, but all segments have that.

Pretty much the whole documentary is the making of Raiders of the Lost Ark, Temple of Doom, and Last Crusade. There are interviews with actors and George Lucas and Steven Spielberg and they talk about the making of the whole trilogy. The casting for Raiders, the bridge for Temple of Doom, and the rats of the Last Crusade are just a couple of the many things that they talk about. The Raiders segment is roughly 80 minutes, Temple of Doom is roughly 40 minutes, and Last Crusade is roughly 50 minutes. Overall, this is a great documentary that gives you some interesting information about this great trilogy.

9/10

Recommended Documentaries: Within a Minute.

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2 out of 13 people found the following review useful:

question

Author: oscarinca from brazil
27 July 2005

This producer is the real force behind many films. I recognize some hidden codes in the trilogy of Indiana Jones maybe cos I check some scenes paying attention to Hebrew detailed inscriptions. Does anybody here know how to contact him, whether a private e-mail or where he works? It doesn't matter if he answers to me but I need to mention some things specially about the rumors of the plot in Indiana Jones in a unique letter, no need to send more than one. I managed myself to sent a letter to Spielberg but I need this other address. Anybody can help me? You see the themes he's picking are linked with a pattern and we know George Lucas knows about mysticism because he learned many things from Master Joseph Campbell. Even the names he uses like "Anakin" are taken from specific parts.

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