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The Producers (2005)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Musical | 25 December 2005 (USA)
After putting together another Broadway flop, down-on-his-luck producer Max Bialystock teams up with timid accountant Leo Bloom in a get-rich-quick scheme to put on the world's worst show.

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(screenplay), (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
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2,863 ( 1,144)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 4 Golden Globes. Another 1 win & 13 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Prison Trustee
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Lick Me-Bite Me
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Kiss Me-Feel Me
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Bryn Dowling ...
Usherette / Girl with Pearls / Little Old Lady / Bavarian Peasant
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Usherette / Girl with Pearls / Little Old Lady / Tapping Brown Shirt
Kevin Ligon ...
Workman / Little Old Lady
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Storyline

New York, 1959. Max Bialystock was once the king of Broadway, but now all his shows close on opening night. Things turn around when he's visited by the neurotic accountant Leo Bloom, who proposes a scheme tailor-made for producers who can only make flops: raise far more money than you need, then make sure the show is despised. No one will be interested in it, so you can pocket the surplus. To this end, they produce a musical called Springtime for Hitler written by escaped Nazi Franz Liebken. Then they get the insanely flamboyant Roger De Bris to direct. Finally, they hire as a lead actress the loopy Swedish bombshell Ulla (whose last name has over 15 syllables). As opening night draws near, what can go wrong? Well, there's no accounting for taste... Written by rmlohner

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Musical

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexual humor and references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

25 December 2005 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Producers: The Movie Musical  »

Box Office

Budget:

$45,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$154,590 (USA) (18 December 2005)

Gross:

$19,377,727 (USA) (19 February 2006)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Richard Kind, who played Max Bialystock on Broadway and on the national tour, makes a brief cameo as the jury foreman at the end. See more »

Goofs

Where Max and Leo are in the park, and Max is begging Leo to do the scheme with him, the shadow of the trees changes. When the camera zooms out, the shadows are all over the ground in front of the fountain. When the camera zooms out again momentarily, the shadow is completely gone. See more »

Quotes

Roger De Bris: This crazy Kraut is crackers! He crashed in here and crassly tried to kill us!
Carmen Ghia: Oh, Roger, what alliteration!
Roger De Bris: Thank you, darling.
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Crazy Credits

After the credits finish, cast members from the film (including a cameo by Mel Brooks) sing the number "Goodbye!", which is sung in the stage version at the conclusion of the curtain call. See more »

Connections

References The Fly (1958) See more »

Soundtracks

Der Guten Tag Hop Clop
Music and Lyrics by Mel Brooks
Performed by Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick and Will Ferrell
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Surprisingly Disappointing
14 October 2006 | by (Ireland) – See all my reviews

I am a huge fan of the original movie and had the pleasure of seeing the wonderful Broadway show in 2003, so I was more than expecting to love this remake. Unfortunately it didn't live-up to my expectations on a number of fronts.

Most fundamentally, it seemed more of a cinematic rendering of the stage show than a remake of the movie - the problem is that it utterly lacks the charm of the 1968 film, and fails to capture the excitement and energy of the show. This is not to do with the actors, who all put in great performances and do the best job possible with their roles. Though, I wonder if it was a good idea to keep the leads from Broadway

  • playing a part on stage is very different from doing the same thing
in a movie. This is at the heart of what is wrong with this movie - it is trying to be cinematic and theatrical at the same time.

Also, they have cut some of the funniest scenes and changed some of the best lines from the original. Why, I wonder? For example, the first encounter between Max and Leo in the original movie is hilarious and dramatic - a magnificent opening set-piece, with drama, humour and conflict. In this version, Leo just knocks on the door and introduces himself. Bit of a damp squib, really.

Overall, I am not sure what to make of this movie. I would probably have enjoyed it more if I had not seen the original. But not much.


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