A young criminal attorney and his firm-owning father defend a 19 year-old on trial for a murder that he swears he did not commit. Personal conflicts arise with the attorney and his father ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
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Francis Toohey
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Rudy Bond ...
Peter D'Agostino
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Herself / Commercial Spokeswoman
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1st Guard
Michael Higgins ...
Sergeant James Sheeley
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Mary Ellen Bailey
John McGovern ...
Dr. Horace Bell
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Joseph Gordon (as Steven McQueen)
Vivian Nathan ...
Mrs. Gordon
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Betsy Fuller
Milton Selzer ...
2nd Guard
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David J. Stewart ...
Dr. Victor Wallach
Arthur Storch ...
Seymour Miller
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Storyline

A young criminal attorney and his firm-owning father defend a 19 year-old on trial for a murder that he swears he did not commit. Personal conflicts arise with the attorney and his father while the prosecution puts on a dramatic and convincing argument of guilt. Written by Flotis

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Drama

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25 February 1957 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

Snippets of this 50 year old television drama were used in the 2007 television program "Boston Legal" (episode: Son of the Defender) where the now older Shatner recalled back to instances where he and his father (played by Ralph Bellamy) were in discussion of a man's innocence, played by the then unknown Steve McQueen. It melded well into the Boston Legal episode. See more »

Connections

Featured in Boston Legal: Son of the Defender (2007) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Pure dreck
19 February 2013 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Frankly, this Studio One presentation is an insult to the legal profession. The writing is atrocious and the actors chew the scenery relentlessly.

To begin with, Bellamy's character - a veteran attorney - commits legal malpractice in failing to offer his client an adequate defense. Among other things, he prejudges his client (not his job), he fails to object to the prosecutor introducing a surprise witness (not permitted); he fails to object to the prosecutor badgering a defense witness, and he consents to a ludicrous, outrageous stunt to impeach the principal prosecution witnesses. Frankly, they could have been impeached without the trick.

While most courtroom dramas stretch credulity, this abysmal effort destroys the willing suspension of disbelief.


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