Family Theatre (1949–1958)
6.4/10
63
5 user 2 critic

Hill Number One: A Story of Faith and Inspiration 

A respectful interpretation of what might have happened among Jesus's followers in the three days before Crucifixion. The story is told in the modern context of an US Army company stationed in Korea during the Korean War.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Patrick Peyton ...
Host (as Father Patrick Peyton)
Gordon Oliver ...
Padre
Todd Karns ...
Cpl. Bates
...
Pvt. Huntington (The Professor)
Charles Smith ...
Pvt. Carson
Ray Hyke ...
Sgt. Mansfield
Spec O'Donnell ...
Pvt. Cashman (as 'Spec' O'Donnell)
...
Pvt. Wheeler (as Bill Schallert)
Dan Rankins ...
Cpl. Weaver
Marc Hamilton ...
Pvt. Madigan
Peter Similuk ...
Forward Observer
...
...
...
...
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Storyline

A respectful interpretation of what might have happened among Jesus's followers in the three days before Crucifixion. The story is told in the modern context of an US Army company stationed in Korea during the Korean War.

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Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

25 March 1951 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Roddy McDowall's television debut. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Bible According to Hollywood (1994) See more »

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User Reviews

 
familiar faces
5 July 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

In a piece as deep as this is supposed to be, it's a guilty pleasure to look for the familiar faces among the actors who would later become very famous.

First, the story, though. It's done in flashback style, a style overused today for no reason, but here it at least has a theatrical reason.

The theatrics of this Resurrection story are actually better than one sees today, because since about 1980, everyone in the world has become a ham, so the acting here may seem out of place to a world of natural hams. There was a day when people did speak and behave in the way these people did, though, and it's logical to believe that being before the information age, it's closer to reality.

The most recognizable face you will see is Michael Ansara, whom I didn't expect to see, but he just has a more recognizable face than the more famous Roddy McDowell, because of the distinctive characteristics.

It's a decent play, and puts one in mind of a stage play.


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