An Aldermaston-type ban-the-bomb group is staging sit-in demonstrations around London, even on the steps of Whitehall. Worse, they keep releasing top secret documents in fliers and press ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
Gerry Paynter
Angela Douglas ...
Sheila O'Hare
Godfrey Quigley ...
Grimsmith
...
Minister
Alan Webb ...
Lord Kemble
Joan Hickson ...
Sara Forsythe
...
Willi Hausknecht
Manning Wilson ...
Rev. Hailey
Laurie Asprey ...
Demonstrator
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Storyline

An Aldermaston-type ban-the-bomb group is staging sit-in demonstrations around London, even on the steps of Whitehall. Worse, they keep releasing top secret documents in fliers and press releases, so a young agent is sent to infiltrate them to discover who their government source is. Written by WesternOne

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Drama | War

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23 October 1963 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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When Grimsmith points out Lord Kemble to Paynter from an upstairs window, he describes him as "the old man in the comforter". As the character is British and the setting London, he wouldn't say "comforter", he'd just say "scarf". See more »

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Controversial issue mishandled
2 May 2012 | by See all my reviews

Contains Spoilers: The issue of nuclear weapons proliferation is addressed here in an absurdly false manner. A wholesome and lovely young girl amongst other squeaky clean protesters represents the bomb banners. They mention Ghandi, they proclaim they're not communists. She's motivated by a WWII bombing experience that didn't go well. An East German agent is shown to have nothing to do with them. Their leader is a lovable old grandfatherly professor and a Nobel laureate. So they're a mixture of wise, young, beautiful, sincere, apolitical charmers. They're pure of heart and soul, and they believe exposing sensitive government documents is perfectly justified. We're being told, more or less, they have a valid point, embarrassing Whitehall, and in a larger sense, NATO, is a good thing. Putting their fellow citizens at risk doesn't weigh very heavily on their minds. The opposite number is the Prime Minister and his men. The young agent that infiltrates the group is lulled over to their side without finding out the source of the document leak.

Though the PM talks about the need for nukes in the face of the Soviet threat, it's all negated because he's an old uptight, ugly chap in a somber Bond street suit and so are his cronies. The clean-up of the story is that the Prime Minister is an old friend of the professor, and his own wife has been feeding the demonstrators the secrets, who naturally will not suffer prosecution. She must be pure-hearted also. So nobody pays for the egregious breach of security, nobody is decidedly right or wrong, and life cheerily goes on, now all smiles,but still protesting and demonstrating as before though a friendlier attitude when the police break it up. The young man and the girl are dating. Relativism wins.


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