It's 1777, and a mysterious lady is in London...is she spying for the American revolutionaries?? Dr Johnson and Boswell investigate, but always seem a couple of steps behind...

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
Stanley Baxter ...
Jill Bennett ...
Mistress Patience Wright
...
Chief Madkeeper
Max Adrian ...
Dr. Driffield
Pauline Boty ...
Mistress Fleay
...
The Potter
Mark Dignam ...
General Burgoyne
...
Footman
Patsy Byrne ...
Maid
Gordon Gostelow ...
David Garrick
Edward Jewesbury ...
Mr. Eden
Declan Mulholland ...
The Lout
Alan Hockey ...
Assistant Madkeeper
Edna Doré ...
Lavender Seller
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Storyline

It's 1777, and a mysterious lady is in London...is she spying for the American revolutionaries?? Dr Johnson and Boswell investigate, but always seem a couple of steps behind...

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Drama | War

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12 February 1964 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

This series gave Michael Powell his first experience of directing for television. This segment gave him the chance to cast Roger Livesey, one of his favorite actors, as Dr. Johnson, his favorite Englishman. Perhaps to celebrate the fact, he also cast his wife, Frankie Reidy, and their two young sons in uncredited bit parts. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Great men of letters as cartoonish nincompoops.
29 May 2012 | by See all my reviews

It's Johnson and Boswell as clownish bumblers.The overall cuteness of the characters is embarrassing; It's as if it was made by Disney for children. The stifling sets give it a desperately cheap look as well. Somehow I get the feeling that this was included in the series to compliment Americans in reference to the revolution, an important point in that it was intended for showing on NBC. Yet to choose a comic farce like this not only is insulting to the memory of a literary figure worthy of respect, it's hardly complimentary to the intended audience if they regarded the only way yanks would pay attention to an 18th century story would be if it's done as if it were a cleaned up "Tom Jones" sequence.


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