The teleplay was adapted by Harlan Ellison from his autobiographical story "The Gang", which appears in his book "Memos from Purgatory". Fresh college graduate and wannabee writer Jay Shaw ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Alfred Hitchcock - Host
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Jay Shaw / Phil Beldone
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Filene - Girl Gang Member
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Tiger
Tony Musante ...
Candle
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Fish
Simon Scott ...
The Defender
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Michael Lamont ...
The Trooper
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Ben
Jacquelin Palmer ...
Cherry (as Jacque Palmer)
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Ski
Jimmy Joyce ...
Proprietor
Will J. White ...
Guard
Leonard P. Geer ...
Derelict
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Storyline

The teleplay was adapted by Harlan Ellison from his autobiographical story "The Gang", which appears in his book "Memos from Purgatory". Fresh college graduate and wannabee writer Jay Shaw moves to early 1950's New York and decides that if he's going to write fiction about juvenile delinquent gangs, he'd better learn what they are really like. Becoming tough-guy Phil Beldone, he moves to a rough section of Brooklyn and seeks to join the Barons, a violent youth gang led by Tiger. During his three-step initiation into the gang, he gains Tiger's trust and respect and begins to fall in love with one of the gang's "debs". However, he makes an enemy of the gang's second-in-command, and risks exposure of his true identity. Written by Joshua Saint

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21 December 1964 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Connections

References King Kong (1933) See more »

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User Reviews

Hokey
15 February 2017 | by (Claremont,USA) – See all my reviews

Wanting to gather authentic material for a book, a wannabe writer joins a Brooklyn street gang undercover.

Looks like I'm a minority, but I found the entry hokey as heck. The well-scrubbed cast, by and large, looks like they just stepped out of studio make-up. Only Candle (Musante) manages a degree of gang boy grit, while Caan looks about ten years to old for a delinquent. To me, the only interesting feature is Shaw's (Caan) innuendo that the gang chieftain, Tiger(!), may be gay. Now that's a real departure for the period.

Note how the script both finesses censorship and preserves Shaw's upright morality by implying no sex between him and Filene (Loring). But then this so-called gang girl looks and acts like a perfectly innocent virgin. That may help the ending, but further compromises the premise. Remember, this is supposed to be the toughest neighborhood in Brooklyn. Now, maybe I'm a fuss-budget, but the gang's calling their girls "Debs" sounds like a sorority instead of something more street-wise. Then too, the girls stand around like wallflowers waiting to dance. The ending, however, aptly dramatizes what the production was trying to get at. Too bad, the remainder is too airbrushed to equal the upshot.

Anyway, juvenile delinquency was a popular screen topic for about a ten-year period. For sheer grit, Blackboard Jungle (1955) shows how it could be done. I guess Hitch's show wanted to make a contribution to social betterment. But, looks to me like the series should stick to what it does best, namely, dark rooms and white-knuckle suspense.


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