IMDb > "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" The Dividing Wall (1963)

"The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" The Dividing Wall (1963)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.0/10   103 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
George Bellak (story)
Joel Murcott (teleplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Dividing Wall on IMDbPro.
Original Air Date:
6 December 1963 (Season 2, Episode 9)
Genre:
Plot:
A wall separating the innocent from the guilty is perilously breached when ex-cons mistakenly steal radioactive cobalt... See more » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Better Than Average See more (2 total) »

Cast

 (Episode Cast) (in credits order)

Alfred Hitchcock ... Himself - Host

James Gregory ... Fred Kruger

Chris Robinson ... Terry

Katharine Ross ... Carol Brandt

Norman Fell ... Al Norman
Simon Scott ... Durrell
Bob Kelljan ... Frank Ludden (as Robert Kelljan)
Rusty Lane ... Otto Brandt
Judd Foster ... Polson
Renata Vanni ... The Woman Customer
William Boyett ... The Radio Operator
Erik Corey ... The Little Boy

Episode Crew
Directed by
Bernard Girard 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
George Bellak  story
Joel Murcott  teleplay

Produced by
Joan Harrison .... producer
Gordon Hessler .... associate producer
 
Original Music by
Lyn Murray (music score)
 
Cinematography by
William Margulies (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Edward W. Williams 
 
Art Direction by
Raymond Beal 
 
Set Decoration by
Julia Heron 
John McCarthy Jr.  (as John McCarthy)
 
Makeup Department
Jack Barron .... makeup artist
Florence Bush .... hair stylist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
John Clarke Bowman .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Frank H. Wilkinson .... sound
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Burton Miller .... costumes
 
Editorial Department
David J. O'Connell .... editorial department head
 
Music Department
Stanley Wilson .... music supervisor
 

Series Crew
These people are regular crew members. Were they in this episode?
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
George Bellak  story (one episode)
Andrew Benedict  story (2 episodes)
John Bingham  story (2 episodes)
Nicholas Blake  story (one episode)
Robert Bloch  story (4 episodes)
Robert Branson  story (one episode)
Thomas H. Cannan Jr.  story (one episode)
Avram Davidson  story (one episode)
Lewis Davidson  story (2 episodes)
Amber Dean  story (one episode)
Richard Deming  story (one episode)
Francis Didelot  story (one episode)
Nigel Elliston  story (one episode)
Lee Erwin  story (one episode)
Kenneth Fearing  story (one episode)
Richard Fielder  story (one episode)
Celia Fremlin  story (one episode)
John Garden  story (one episode)
Oliver H.P. Garrett  story (one episode)
C.B. Gilford  story (one episode)
Robert Gould  story (one episode)
Larry M. Harris  story (one episode)
Elizabeth Hely  story (one episode)
James Holding  story (one episode)
Randall Hood  story (one episode)
S.B. Hough  story (one episode)
Clark Howard  story (one episode)
W.W. Jacobs  story (one episode)
Selwyn Jepson  story (one episode)
Veronica Parker Johns  story (one episode)
Henry Kane  story (2 episodes)
Roland Kibbee  story (one episode)
Hilda Lawrence  story (one episode)
Richard Levinson  story (one episode)
William Link  story (one episode)
Marie Belloc Lowndes  story (one episode)
John D. MacDonald  story (one episode)
Margaret Manners  story (one episode)
Max Marquis  story (one episode)
André Maurois  story (one episode)
Margaret Millar  story (one episode)
Emily Neff  story (one episode)
Helen Nielsen  story (one episode)
V.S. Pritchett  story (one episode)
Jack Ritchie  story (2 episodes)
Samuel Rogers  story (one episode)
Arthur A. Ross  story (one episode)
Sidney Rowland  story (one episode)
Mann Rubin  story (one episode)
Charles Runyon  story (one episode)
Henry Slesar  story (7 episodes)
Boris Sobelman  story (one episode)
Julian Symons  story (one episode)
Robert Twohy  story (one episode)
Gabrielle Upton  story (one episode)
Douglas Warner  story (one episode)
H.G. Wells  story (one episode)
Hugh Wheeler  story (one episode) (as Patrick Quentin)
Ethel Lina White  story (one episode)
Paul Winterton  story (2 episodes) (as Andrew Garve)
Cornell Woolrich  story (one episode)
John Wyndham  story (one episode)
James Yaffe  story (one episode)

Film Editing by
David J. O'Connell 
 
Sound Department
John C. Grubb .... sound
 
Stunts
Ronnie Rondell Jr. .... stunts
 
Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Runtime:
60 min
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Goofs:
Continuity: The 400-pound safe is about twice as tall than it is wide. When it is dropped on its face onto the crawler, the crawler wheels are smashed and makes the crawler and the safe immobile. When the forklift smashes into the office, scoops up the safe and withdraws from the office with the safe on the fork, the safe has been turned 90 degrees to fit comfortably onto the two fork prongs even though the two men still in the office could not possibly have shifted the safe 90 degrees.See more »

FAQ

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4 out of 4 people found the following review useful.
Better Than Average, 11 August 2015
Author: dougdoepke from Claremont, USA

Catch that opening hook that sets the stage for what follows. Poor Terry (Robinson) is going blurry-eyed nutzoid with four walls closing around him. Good thing he's not back in prison. It's a highly suspenseful entry, with an especially strong turn by James Gregory as the gang leader who really makes you believe it. I like the way the script fills in important details as it goes along. That adds to interest.

So what is the heist gang going to do with that odd-looking cylinder they stole along with the money. Worse, why is gangster Al's (Fell) hand burning now that he's fooled with it. It's a good imaginative gimmick— (catch Vince Edwards in City of Fear {1959} for similar gripping gimmick). The relationship Terry has with next-door sweetie Carol (Ross) figures nicely into the main plot, and is not just an eye-appealing add-on. Still, the ending is more Hollywood than Hitchcock, and should have been part of Hitch's wrap-up. In my little book, it compromises too much of the tough tone that's gone before. Nonetheless, this is a compelling little suspenser not to be missed.

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Related Links

Main series Episode guide Full cast and crew
Company credits IMDb TV section IMDb Crime section

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