Dave Snowden elopes with wealthy Bonnie Daniels, and Mr. Spencer sees them break into the abandoned old estate where Bonnie lived until age six. Mr. Spencer informs Bonnie's mother, Mrs. ... See full summary »

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Alfred Hitchcock - Host
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Mrs. Daniels
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Dave Snowden
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Bonnie Daniels
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Adam Driscoll
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Dave Snowden elopes with wealthy Bonnie Daniels, and Mr. Spencer sees them break into the abandoned old estate where Bonnie lived until age six. Mr. Spencer informs Bonnie's mother, Mrs. Daniels, who finds Snowden struggling to open a mysterious locked door on the upper floor. Mrs. Daniels annuls the marriage, because Bonnie's true age is only 17, not 19, as Dave was told. Three weeks later, when Bonnie reaches majority, she rejoins Dave, and they consummate nuptials, but Mrs. Daniels will not release Bonnie's trust fund until she is 25. Dave convinces Bonnie to attempt suicide with sleeping pills, in order to convince her mother that she loves Dave. Although she takes only 4 pills, Bonnie dies, because of a history of rheumatic disease. As an apparent gesture of goodwill, Mrs. Daniels grants Dave the childhood estate. Dave proclaims that he only married Bonnie for her money. Mrs. Daniels, hiding in the house, overhears Dave's admission, then watches as he enters the locked door, ... Written by Lewis O. Amack

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27 March 1964 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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extremely stupid
16 July 2013 | by (French Polynesia) – See all my reviews

Based on Hitchcock staple and stable writer Henry Slesar story, I'll assume his name and reputation got the producers interested in what is an extremely stupid story and episode.

Also the casting is off. Lyn Loring is not plane or homely looking girl they keep referring to her as. Glora Swanson is old enough to be her grandmother not her mother--as Loring character is supposed to be 17 years old and is dressed like a grandmother rather than a mother as well.

James MacArthur is good and has a fun, if not very convincing, turn.

Producer director Douglas has one excellent creepy shot of Swanson near the end but this is overused as well.

The trouble is the major plot twists make no sense at all and are, afraid to use the overused word, but they are almost offensively stupid, they require the characters to become stupid and are just not convincing or motivated by the story either.

Herrmann contributes an original score but doesn't seem to be working too hard to save this show, which probably couldn't be saved anyway. He does fill up some silences and mostly focuses on scoring the kitchen sink romance element of the show. This aspect of the story does work though it's really just padding.

Sincere performances help--Swanson has one kind of campy moment, but the thing also feels padded in the middle. And the reasons for what's BEHIND THE DOOR becoming so important are also not convincing.

Nicely produced episode is all you can say in favor of it but the story doesn't work in an hour format and probably would work even less well, if that's possible, in a short form.

Well they can't all be winners. Hithcocks wrap around is the best part, involving changing signs on public restrooms. Skip the rest and watch these only if you can.


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