7.6/10
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5 user 1 critic

The Thirty-First of February 

An inquest rules a wife's death as accidental, but when the widower returns to work, it seems someone is tricking him, including a letter accusing him of murder and one of his wife's ... See full summary »

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(teleplay) (as Logan Swanson), (based on the novel by)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
...
Himself
...
Andrew Anderson
...
Sgt. Cresse
...
Staats Cotsworth ...
Vincent
William Sargent ...
Peter Granville
...
Charlie Lessing
Steve Gravers ...
The Psychiatrist
...
The D.A.
Bernadette Hale ...
Miss Wright
...
Reverton
Kathleen O'Malley ...
Valerie Anderson
Robert Carson ...
The Coroner
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Storyline

An inquest rules a wife's death as accidental, but when the widower returns to work, it seems someone is tricking him, including a letter accusing him of murder and one of his wife's letters appearing, revealing she had a lover. Increasingly the widower's own mind tricks him, rejecting logical explanations, instead angrily confronting his co-workers. Written by David Stevens

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Certificate:

TV-PG
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Release Date:

4 January 1963 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Sly Suspenser
20 November 2015 | by (Claremont,USA) – See all my reviews

It's a standout 60-minutes featuring a highly unorthodox ending. Anderson (Wayne) is an executive with a high-powered industrial design firm. Unfortunately, his wife dies in what appears an accidental fall in a darkened basement. An inquest rules the death accidental, but cop Cresse (Conrad) has suspicions. Meanwhile, Anderson's under a lot of pressure at work, and begins to fall apart when he starts receiving evidence that his wife was unfaithful. So who's trying to wreck him and why.

I imagine stage actor Wayne was hired because the role's pretty demanding, having to go through a number of emotional stages. Suspense kicks in early, and though I suspect some of the office events pad the run-time, they're well enough done not to matter. In fact, office maneuvering almost amount to a sub-text, suggesting a Madison Ave. milieu popular with movies of the time. I suppose a side-draw would be an appearance of ill-fated Bob Crane as ambitious junior executive Lessing. Crane's murder in 1978 was a much publicized scandal at the time, with a controversial outcome.

Anyway, real life murder aside, it's primo Hitchcock in most all respects and well worth a look-see.


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