MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 92,617 this week

Film as a Subversive Art: Amos Vogel and Cinema 16 (2004)

7.3
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.3/10 from 72 users  
Reviews: 3 user | 3 critic

An hour-long filmed profile of Amos Vogel, 82-year old New York resident and Austrian emigre, founder of the New York Film Festival and America's most important film society, Cinema 16.

Director:

0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 24 titles
created 13 Sep 2012
 
a list of 50 titles
created 12 Jan 2013
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Film as a Subversive Art: Amos Vogel and Cinema 16 (2004)

Film as a Subversive Art: Amos Vogel and Cinema 16 (2004) on IMDb 7.3/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Film as a Subversive Art: Amos Vogel and Cinema 16.
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Amos Vogel ...
Himself
Marcia Vogel ...
Herself
Scott McDonald ...
Himself
Jack Goelman ...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

An hour-long filmed profile of Amos Vogel, 82-year old New York resident and Austrian emigre, founder of the New York Film Festival and America's most important film society, Cinema 16.

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

11 April 2004 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

(archive clips)
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Features Two Men and a Wardrobe (1958) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Be Sand, Not Oil In the Machinery of the World
21 November 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Be uncomfortable; Be sand, not oil in The machinery of the World (Günter Eich)

Amos Vogel published "Film as a Subversive Art" in 1974: his mini-essays on over 600 movies.

Should be a film subversive? As the Italian saying goes, se non è vero è ben trovato (which sometimes changes to se non è vero allora è ben inventato): if it's not true, it's a good story. Well, it's always true for indie movies; for experimental movies; for art movies. Because once you are not in the industry, you must say something: it means something new, making a difference, your difference. Such movies must shake taboos, attack comfortable beliefs: an independent creator must scandalize. Such movies must be sand, not oil.

And for the people the kind of Amos Vogel only such movies exist.

Paul Cronin made in 2003 a one hour documentary about Amos Vogel; the title, "Film as a Subversive Art: Amos Vogel and Cinema 16".

Paul Cronin is also a movie passionate, author of books and documentary films exploring this universe.

This movie about Amos Vogel is perfect: the director leaves the room totally for the personage, not imposing any constraint, not framing in any way. The camera just follows the old guy, giving him total freedom. It is a one hour long filmed profile of the great promoter of the subversive movie: Amos Vogel talking very casually about his life, about the history of Cinema 16, about his aesthetic convictions. The result is a wonderful portrait of a fascinating personage.

Marcia Vogel and Jack Goelman are also there in the movie. Which is natural: the wife and the friend, they worked together with Amos all those years to create and maintain the miracle that has been Cinema 16.

I enormously enjoyed to find in the movie a couple of images from "Meshes of the Afternoon" of Maya Deren and Alexander Hamid. If I were to keep only ten movies on a deserted island, "Meshes of the Afternoon" would be one of them.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Contribute to This Page