Young Harry Holdsworth inherits a superintelligent talking macaw named Madison. This leads to numerous adventures for Harry and his family but it also attracts villainous Terry Crumm who wants the parrot for himself.
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4   3   2   1  
1996   1995   1994   1993  

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Mike Walling ...
 John Holdsworth 35 episodes, 1993-1996
Jackie Lye ...
 Angie Holdsworth 35 episodes, 1993-1996
Anthony Asbury ...
Gareth Parrington ...
 Harry Holdsworth 28 episodes, 1993-1996
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Young Harry Holdsworth inherits a superintelligent talking macaw named Madison. This leads to numerous adventures for Harry and his family but it also attracts villainous Terry Crumm who wants the parrot for himself.

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Family

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4 January 1993 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Harry hat 'nen Vogel  »

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User Reviews

 
One of my favourite shows as a kid.
16 August 2008 | by See all my reviews

Harry's Mad was a story of a normal family who inherit a parrot from an American Great Uncle. Initially they aren't pleased with their new pet but soon realise he is no ordinary parrot, in actual fact he is more intelligent then most people! He gets the family out of a lot of problems but also gets them into numerous problems too.

For some reason IMDb have Harry's Mad as starting in 1996, in actual fact the programme ran from 1993 until 1996. There was some excellent stories throughout the four series life of the show and it is still fresh and enjoyable today as it was when it originally aired.

I'm 22 now and still enjoy watching a few episodes now and again from my tape collection. I don't find them 'childish' like so many modern children's programmes.

I can't understand why so a great programme has been left unrepeated for so many years. I have young cousins who I'm sure would love the programme if only CITV or another channel would show them again.


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