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Black Book (2006) More at IMDbPro »Zwartboek (original title)


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

11 items from 2006


'Beast' rears head at AFM

2 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Producers Jonathan Sanger, Ed Elbert and Sarah Ryan Black launched indie film production and funding outfit Grand Illusions Entertainment with financing partner David Steiner and introduced one of their first features, Beast of Bataan, for presales at AFM.

The World War II drama starring Charlie Hunnam was originally set to be directed by Paul Verhoeven, who was replaced by Fred Schepisi in an amicable parting when Verhoeven's duties on Black Book caused a scheduling conflict. Bataan is slated to begin filming in Queensland, Australia in the spring, and the project has been presold to Greece, Portugal, Russia and the Middle East by Film Bridge International.

The company plans to back two to three features a year in the $5 million-$30 million budget range as well as co-finance several television projects. Its upcoming slate includes Simon Brand's Spanish-language drama Paraiso Travel, starring John Leguizamo; Eric Red's supernatural thriller 100 Feet; a remake of East of Eden, with development and production funding and distribution by Universal Pictures; and an adaptation of the soon-to-be-published Mob novel trilogy Dark Legacy.

Grand Illusions headquarters will be on the Raleigh Studios lot in Hollywood and in Brooklyn at David Steiner's Steiner Studios.

»

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'Beast' rears head at AFM

2 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Producers Jonathan Sanger, Ed Elbert and Sarah Ryan Black launched indie film production and funding outfit Grand Illusions Entertainment with financing partner David Steiner and introduced one of their first features, Beast of Bataan, for presales at AFM.

The World War II drama starring Charlie Hunnam was originally set to be directed by Paul Verhoeven, who was replaced by Fred Schepisi in an amicable parting when Verhoeven's duties on Black Book caused a scheduling conflict. Bataan is slated to begin filming in Queensland, Australia in the spring, and the project has been presold to Greece, Portugal, Russia and the Middle East by Film Bridge International.

The company plans to back two to three features a year in the $5 million-$30 million budget range as well as co-finance several television projects. Its upcoming slate includes Simon Brand's Spanish-language drama Paraiso Travel, starring John Leguizamo; Eric Red's supernatural thriller 100 Feet; a remake of East of Eden, with development and production funding and distribution by Universal Pictures; and an adaptation of the soon-to-be-published Mob novel trilogy Dark Legacy.

Grand Illusions headquarters will be on the Raleigh Studios lot in Hollywood and in Brooklyn at David Steiner's Steiner Studios.

»

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'Black Book' takes major awards at Dutch fest

9 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

UTRECHT, The Netherlands -- Paul Verhoeven's World War II drama Black Book took the major awards Friday on the closing night of the 26th annual Dutch Film Festival. The Dutch submission for best foreign-language film at next year's Oscars won the Golden Calf for best film and best director, while the lead actress nod went to Carice van Houten, who won the award three times now. The night was a bit of a disappointment for Ober (Waiter), a dark comedy from Alex Van Warmerdam. The film had six nominations but only scored awards for best screenplay and best production design. Van Warmerdam picked up the screenplay nod while Gert Brinkers took production plaudits. »

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'Black Book' takes major awards at Dutch fest

9 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

UTRECHT, The Netherlands -- Paul Verhoeven's World War II drama Black Book took the major awards Friday on the closing night of the 26th annual Dutch Film Festival. The Dutch submission for best foreign-language film at next year's Oscars won the Golden Calf for best film and best director, while the lead actress nod went to Carice van Houten, who won the award three times now. The night was a bit of a disappointment for Ober (Waiter), a dark comedy from Alex Van Warmerdam. The film had six nominations but only scored awards for best screenplay and best production design. Van Warmerdam picked up the screenplay nod while Gert Brinkers took production plaudits. »

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SPC books rights to Verhoeven's WWII drama 'Black'

21 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- Sony Pictures Classics has paid in the high six figures for North American, Australia/New Zealand and Indian rights to Paul Verhoeven's perverse World War II drama Black Book (Zwartboek). The film was roundly ridiculed among distributors at the Toronto International Film Festival as "'Schindler's List' meets 'Showgirls'" (the latter film, another type of camp drama, was notoriously directed by Verhoeven). Scenes often cited include the Jewish female lead character graphically dyeing her pubic hair blonde to infiltrate the Nazi party as a member of the resistance, captors dumping a vat of dung on her and several ribald sexual encounters. The bad word-of-mouth was turned around a bit by some positive reviews and the Netherlands selection of the film as its official foreign language entry for this year's Academy Awards. Some attributed this decision to the film being the first project Verhoeven has directed in his native country in 23 years. His last feature was 2000's Hollow Man. »

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Verhoeven's 'Black Book' wins boxoffice award

18 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

AMSTERDAM, the Netherlands -- Paul Verhoeven's World War II drama Black Book has been awarded the Dutch Golden Film Award for topping 100,000 admissions in the Netherlands. It is the first time a Dutch film has reached this benchmark in just four days, according to the Dutch Film Festival, organizer of the award. Black Book, Verhoeven's first Dutch film in 23 years, is expected to attract at least one million ticket sales, according to producer San Fu Maltha. The film, about a Jewish fugitive (Carice van Houten) who joins the resistance and seduces a Nazi officer (Sebastian Koch), had its world premiere this month at the Venice Film Festival. It also is this year's Dutch entry for the best foreign-language film Oscar. »

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Black Book

5 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

VENICE, Italy -- Paul Verhoeven's World War II drama Black Book is an ambitious throwback to the days of rousing all-action wartime pictures in which an intrepid loner risks everything to fight a clearly defined enemy. It succeeds on almost all fronts. The epic film is a high-octane adventure rooted in fact with a raft of arresting characters, big action sequences and twists and turns galore as a group of Dutch resistance fighters combat the Nazis not knowing they have a traitor at their core.

Top-flight production values and a ripping yarn should mean major boxoffice returns anywhere there is a taste for old-fashioned big-screen entertainment.

Set in German-occupied Holland in 1944, the film follows a young woman named Rachel (Carice van Houten) as she attempts to flee the Nazis with her own and other Jewish families. Having purchased their river passage with all they own, they find the escape is a trap as they are intercepted by the Gestapo and mercilessly mown down.

All except Rachel, who finds her way to a group of resistance fighters run by man named Kuipers (Derek de Lint), who operates a soup kitchen as cover for his sabotage operations. Quickly recruited into the group's inner circle led by daredevil Hans (Thom Hoffman), Rachel demonstrates her bravery and resourcefulness in an encounter on a train with an SS officer named Muntze (Sebastian Koch).

Soon, Rachel is ensconced at the local Gestapo headquarters, sleeping with Muntze and working with a local floozy, Ronnie (Halina Reijn), in the office of a brutal officer named Franken (Waldemar Kopus).

Even though the end of the war is barely months away, the danger increases for the resistance group. When she discovers that there has been a plot involving both Nazis and Dutch in faking escape plans for Jewish families who are murdered and robbed, she finds herself with enemies on all sides.

Director Verhoeven, back on home turf after the Hollywood excesses of Starship Troopers and Showgirls, has fashioned an exciting tale with co-scripter Gerard Soeteman, who developed the original story. Production designer Wilbert Van Dorp and cinematographer Karl Walter Lindenlaub have done a great job in creating period detail and capturing fast-moving sequences and intimate moments. Editors Job ter Burg and James Herbert contribute fine work, and Oscar-winning composer Anne Dudley's score complements it all effectively.

Van Houten makes a memorable heroine, a singer as well as a good actress, in what is a very punishing role. Koch and Hoffman do a lot to give their stereotyped roles some originality.

The filmmakers strive hard to root the picture in genuine drama. There are bookends set in Israel that add considerable emotional resonance. While the revelation of the traitor smacks of melodrama, the high adventure is mixed with moments of authentic wartime pathos.

BLACK BOOK

A Fu Works production in association with Egoli Tossell Film, Clockwork Pictures, Studio Babesberg AG, Motion Investment Group, Motel Films and Hector

A VIP Medienfonds 4 production

Credits:

Director: Paul Verhoeven

Screenwriters: Gerard Soeteman, Paul Verhoeven

Producers: San Fu Maltha, Jos van der Linden, Frans van Geste, Jeroen Baker, Teun Hilte, Jens Meurer

Executive producers: Andreas Grosch, Andrea Schmid, Marcus Schofer, Henning Molfenter, Carl Woebcken, Jamie Carmichael, Graham Begg, Sara Giles

Director of photography: Karl Walter Lindenlaub

Production designer: Wilbert van Dorp

Music: Anne Dudley

Editors: Job ter Burg, James Herbert

Cast:

Rachel/Ellis: Carice van Houten

Ludwig Muntze: Sebastian Koch

Hans Akkermans: Thom Hoffman

Ronnie: Halina Reijn

Gunther Franken: Waldemar Kobus

Gerben Kuipers: Derek de Lint

Gen. Kautner: Christian Berkel

Notary Smaal: Dolf de Vries

Van Gein: Peter Blok

Rob: Michiel Huisman

Tim Kuipers: Ronald Armbrust

Kees: Frank Lammers

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 145 minutes

»

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Premieres dominate Toronto's 352-film lineup

22 August 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- The latest films from Paul Verhoeven, Ridley Scott, Anthony Minghella, Douglas McGrath and Patrice Leconte were tabbed for the red carpet treatment Tuesday as the Toronto International Film Festival released its full 352-film lineup. Festival organizers said they have booked world premieres for Minghella's Breaking and Entering, a Weinstein Co./Miramax drama about intersecting lives in London that stars Jude Law, Juliette Binoche, Robin Wright Penn and Vera Farmiga; and Scott's A Good Year, the Russell Crowe starrer about an investment banker who moves to southern France. 20th Century Fox will release the film Nov. 10. Both will receive high-profile festival sendoffs at Roy Thomson Hall, as will Leconte's comedy Mon meilleur ami (My Best Friend), starring Daniel Auteuil and Dany Boon, and Verhoeven's Zwartboek (Black Book), a Dutch-language thriller about a feisty German Jewish girl surviving World War II. »

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Premieres dominate Toronto's 352-film lineup

22 August 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- The latest films from Paul Verhoeven, Ridley Scott, Anthony Minghella, Douglas McGrath and Patrice Leconte were tabbed for the red carpet treatment Tuesday as the Toronto International Film Festival released its full 352-film lineup. Festival organizers said they have booked world premieres for Minghella's Breaking and Entering, a Weinstein Co./Miramax drama about intersecting lives in London that stars Jude Law, Juliette Binoche, Robin Wright Penn and Vera Farmiga; and Scott's A Good Year, the Russell Crowe starrer about an investment banker who moves to southern France. 20th Century Fox will release the film Nov. 10. Both will receive high-profile festival sendoffs at Roy Thomson Hall, as will Leconte's comedy Mon meilleur ami (My Best Friend), starring Daniel Auteuil and Dany Boon, and Verhoeven's Zwartboek (Black Book), a Dutch-language thriller about a feisty German Jewish girl surviving World War II. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Premieres dominate Toronto's 352-film lineup

22 August 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- The latest films from Paul Verhoeven, Ridley Scott, Anthony Minghella, Douglas McGrath and Patrice Leconte were tabbed for the red carpet treatment Tuesday as the Toronto International Film Festival released its full 352-film lineup. Festival organizers said they have booked world premieres for Minghella's Breaking and Entering, a Weinstein Co./Miramax drama about intersecting lives in London that stars Jude Law, Juliette Binoche, Robin Wright Penn and Vera Farmiga; and Scott's A Good Year, the Russell Crowe starrer about an investment banker who moves to southern France. 20th Century Fox will release the film Nov. 10. Both will receive high-profile festival sendoffs at Roy Thomson Hall, as will Leconte's comedy Mon meilleur ami (My Best Friend), starring Daniel Auteuil and Dany Boon, and Verhoeven's Zwartboek (Black Book), a Dutch-language thriller about a feisty German Jewish girl surviving World War II. »

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Double Dutch for Verhoeven with 'Violets'

12 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

AMSTERDAM -- Dutch director Paul Verhoeven, who lives primarily in Los Angeles, is planning his second consecutive film in his native language. After finishing the World War II drama Zwartboek (Blackbook), which is in postproduction, Verhoeven will direct an adaptation of the Dutch best-seller Knielen op een bed violen (Kneeling on a Bed of Violets), producer Alain De Levita said Friday. The book, written by Jan Siebelink, deals with religious issues and focuses on a character who has a divine revelation. The film reunites Verhoeven with scriptwriter Gerard Soeteman, who collaborated with him on all of his major Dutch films including Soldier of Orange and Turkish Delight. The budget is estimated at €10 million ($12.9 million), and shooting is set to begin next year. »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

11 items from 2006


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