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Relentless: Struggle for Peace in the Middle East (2003)
"Relentless: The Struggle for Peace in Israel" (original title)

Video  -  Documentary  -  2003 (USA)
6.3
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Relentless: The Struggle for Peace in the Middle East was produced by the pro-Israel media watchdog group HonestReporting [sic]. The concentrates on the causes of the Second Intifada ... See full summary »

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Title: Relentless: Struggle for Peace in the Middle East (Video 2003)

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Cast

Credited cast:
S. El-Herfi
Joseph Farah
Raanan Gissin
Caroline Glick
John Loftus
Sherri Mandel
Itamar Marcus
Yariv Oppenheim
Daniel Pipes
Tashbih Sayyed
Natan Sharansky
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Relentless: The Struggle for Peace in the Middle East was produced by the pro-Israel media watchdog group HonestReporting [sic]. The concentrates on the causes of the Second Intifada through an examination of compliance the Oslo Accords, by Israel and the Palestinian Authority. It pays particular attention to the failure of the Palestinian Authority to "educate for peace". The documentary shows interviews with Itamar Marcus, director of Palestinian Media Watch, S. El-Herfi, Raanan Gissin, Caroline Glick, John Loftus, Sherri Mandel, Yariv Oppenheim, Daniel Pipes, Tashbih Sayyed and Natan Sharansky. Written by Whaledad

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2003 (USA)  »

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Relentless: Struggle for Peace in the Middle East  »

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Followed by Obsession: Radical Islam's War Against the West (2005) See more »

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Eye-opening
21 May 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

For those who might be sitting on the fence as regards the Israeli-Palestinian conflict this documentary is an eye-opener. I've always found the Palestinian position untenable because of their use of terror. There is no excuse for using your children to kill other people's children regardless of the grievance. It is particularly horrific to use such tactics when peaceful ones--such as those championed by Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr.--could be employed with great effect, and indeed might win over much of the world to the Palestinian cause.

After viewing this documentary I am even more disgusted, appalled, sickened and horrified by Palestinian leadership, especially that of the Palestinian Authority under Yasser Arafat. His two-faced, lying persona in which he pretends to be for peace when in fact his actions actually escalated terror are well known from the historical record. However what this documentary shows is that the increase in terror is only one way in which the Palestinian leadership has made it clear that they do not recognize the right of the Jewish people to exist. They still want to drive all the Jews from the lands in the Middle East, even if that means killing all of them.

"Relentless" begins by outlining the conflict from the establishment of the Jewish state by the Allied powers following WWII. There was one very large problem with that creation: many Palestinians were displaced. Like so much that is wrong in the Middle East and elsewhere in the world, the fault began with miscalculated actions by the colonial powers. Having acknowledged that fact--and this documentary, to the credit of its authors, does indeed do that--one must, some sixty years later ask, what is to be done now? One answer was the Oslo accords to which both the Palestinians and the Israelis agreed. However, as this film makes clear it was only the Israelis who lived up to the agreement. The Palestinians did not. Not only was the terror escalated (perhaps the Palestinian leadership thought that the accords were a "reward" for their use of terror), but there was an escalation in the indoctrination of the Palestinian children so that even the youngest children might hate Jews and want to kill them. This film shows Palestinian children reciting words of hatred and singing songs of hatred and violence toward Jews and asserting that what they want to do with their lives is kill Jews. One little girl of about six says that the highest calling of all for her is to become a martyr who kills Jews and dies doing it.

Personally, I think the Israelis were foolish to believe anything Arafat said or to enter into any sort of agreement with him. Of course that is hindsight, but could have been easily discerned by just looking at his record. Now the question is what about the current Palestinian leadership? Has anything really changed? There seems little hope for peace because the vast majority of the people of Palestine have been totally indoctrinated with hatred of the Jewish people, so much so that the majority of them actually believe things that have no basis in reality. For example, a majority of the Palestinian people believe that Jews were the ones who flew the planes into the World Trade Center buildings. They are taught by their religious leaders that Allah wants them to kill Jews. This is insanity on a grand scale. While this mind set prevails I am afraid there will be no peace in the Holy Land.

Well, what about the faults of the Israelis? What about the wall and the settlements and the inescapable fact that Jews have displaced Palestinians, many of whom now live in camps or in Jordan or elsewhere and are subject to checkpoints that restrict their movements? I would note that the Sunnis displaced Kurds in Iraq, that Europeans displaced Natives in the Americas, that Europeans displaced Aborigines in Australia, and if we go far enough back we can note that that Cro-Magnons displaced Neanderthals. None of this is good, but we cannot turn back the clock. We cannot send the Europeans or others back to their homelands. The vast majority of people alive today in Israeli had nothing to do with the establishment of the Jewish state, no more than I had anything to do with slavery in the US. What is necessary is a compromise between what is best for the displaced and those who have displaced them. That is what the two-state solution attempts. But when one party to the prospective agreement teaches its children genocide, then what agreement is possible? One last point from the film: If the Palestinians laid down their arms their prospects for an improvement in their lives would probably actually increase. If the Israelis laid down their arms, they would be slaughtered.

(Note: Over 500 of my movie reviews are now available in my book "Cut to the Chaise Lounge or I Can't Believe I Swallowed the Remote!" Get it at Amazon!)


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