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The Greatest Game Ever Played (2005)

In the 1913 US Open, 20-year-old Francis Ouimet played against his idol, 1900 US Open champion, Englishman Harry Vardon.

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(book), (screenplay)
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3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Tom Rack ...
Black Top Hatted Man
Armand Laroche ...
Black Top Hatted Man
Peter Hurley ...
Black Top Hatted Man
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Black Top Hatted Man
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Embry Wallis
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Alec Campbell
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Young Sarah Wallis
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Arthur Ouimet
Jamie Merling ...
Young Louise Ouimet
Eugenio Esposito ...
Young Raymond Ouimet
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Robin Wilcock ...
Bernard Darwin
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Storyline

Near the turn of the twentieth century, young Harry Vardon becomes a champion golfer but learns that his amazing skill is no match for the class boundaries that exclude him from "gentlemanly" English society. A dozen years later, a young American, Francis Ouimet, fights against the same prejudice, as well as his own father's disdain, for a chance to participate in the U.S. Open against his idol -- Harry Vardon. The struggles of both men for acceptance provides the background for an amazing contest of skills. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Drama | History | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some brief mild language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

30 September 2005 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El juego que hizo historia  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$3,657,322 (USA) (30 September 2005)

Gross:

$15,331,289 (USA) (25 November 2005)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The real Francis Ouimet and Eddie Lowery remained life long friends. When Ouimet died in 1967, Lowery was one of the pall-bearers. See more »

Goofs

The 17th hole of The Country Club is shown as a dogleg right, and Harry hits his ball into an unseen trap on the right side of the corner of the dogleg. In 1913, The Country Club's 17th hole was a dogleg left, and Vardon hit his ball into a trap on the left side of the fairway. See more »

Quotes

Francis Ouimet: Don't ever talk to my caddy again.
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Connections

Referenced in The Tonight Show with Jay Leno: Episode #13.165 (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

The Band Played On
Written by John F. Palmer and Chas. B. Ward
Arranged by Marshall Bowen
Performed by Amick Byram
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User Reviews

 
Great Disney Sports Movie
9 October 2005 | by (San Bernardino) – See all my reviews

As a recreational golfer with some knowledge of the sport's history, I was pleased with Disney's sensitivity to the issues of class in golf in the early twentieth century. The movie depicted well the psychological battles that Harry Vardon fought within himself, from his childhood trauma of being evicted to his own inability to break that glass ceiling that prevents him from being accepted as an equal in English golf society. Likewise, the young Ouimet goes through his own class struggles, being a mere caddie in the eyes of the upper crust Americans who scoff at his attempts to rise above his standing.

What I loved best, however, is how this theme of class is manifested in the characters of Ouimet's parents. His father is a working-class drone who sees the value of hard work but is intimidated by the upper class; his mother, however, recognizes her son's talent and desire and encourages him to pursue his dream of competing against those who think he is inferior.

Finally, the golf scenes are well photographed. Although the course used in the movie was not the actual site of the historical tournament, the little liberties taken by Disney do not detract from the beauty of the film. There's one little Disney moment at the pool table; otherwise, the viewer does not really think Disney. The ending, as in "Miracle," is not some Disney creation, but one that only human history could have written.


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