6.4/10
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Alma mater (2004)

34-year-old Pamela is a small and shy woman. She works at the cash register of a supermarket. She attends a religious temple led by a Brazilian minister. She periodically visits her ... See full summary »

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2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Roxana Blanco ...
Pamela
Nicolás Becerra ...
Katia
Walter Reyno ...
Man with Hat
Beatriz Massons ...
Mrs. Lucia
Werner Schünemann ...
Minister Assunção
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Gladys Areta
Hugo Bardallo
Daniel Bergolo
Silvia Copelo ...
Magdalena
Humberto De Vargas
Jenny Galvan
Gabriela Quartino
Rosa Simonelli
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Storyline

34-year-old Pamela is a small and shy woman. She works at the cash register of a supermarket. She attends a religious temple led by a Brazilian minister. She periodically visits her autistic mother. She is an anonymous character, leading a meaningless life. Suddenly, a miracle occurs. Messages of a marvelous destiny start to reach Pamela in unusual ways: a client, a gentle and charismatic transvestite, her own mother, dreams, bar codes, real and imaginary signals. The Savior of the Next Millennium is apparently on his way and everything indicates that she, being a virgin, is carrying him on her entrails. Impelled to face herself, Pamela undertakes an inner voyage. A paradoxical voyage: the more mystic she grows to be, the more human she becomes. Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Drama | Mystery | Fantasy

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2004 (Uruguay)  »

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1.78 : 1
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User Reviews

 
One may think what he wants, but the music's great!
7 May 2006 | by (Germany) – See all my reviews

Playing quite a while on the new Latin American cinema topos of identity and break-out of traditions, Alma Mater finishes furiously with the all-too optimistic expectations of it's viewers, based exactly on what has been just mentioned above. First, the final isn't any happy, though neither desperate. Second, Uruguayan society and family traditions do not exactly allow you to develop your personality if it doesn't correspond to some kind of mainstream; what the movie shows therefore is the realization of an emancipation movement under circumstances that might fairly enough be called difficult, and for which the merely existence of an advancing through hard times is already worth some smile and optimism. Now, if anything of the above is new, or even artistically well drawn in Alma Mater (pronouncing, though, the marvelous acting of Nicolás Becerra) has to be discussed in the future - but the selection of the film's soundtrack can surely not be characterized with less than the best south American o.s.t. in recent years. Minimalist arrangements with angelical voices might sound pathetic or even boring, but they moved every listener I've consulted. Hopefully the tracks will be available soon outside Uruguay. If one knows where, please contact me!


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