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A Florida Romance (1913)

John Bruce and his daughter, Bess, were plain Southern country folks, growing oranges. Old Bruce likes Jim Lang, an employee, who loves Bess. One day the young folks ask his consent to ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Bess Bruce
Irving White ...
John Bruce - Bess's Father
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Jim Lang
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Florence
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Count de Tornay
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Storyline

John Bruce and his daughter, Bess, were plain Southern country folks, growing oranges. Old Bruce likes Jim Lang, an employee, who loves Bess. One day the young folks ask his consent to their marriage. He tells Jim to wait a year. Bess goes to visit city relatives, and when the year is up she forgets Jim. She becomes cultured and falls in love with Count De Tourney. One day Jim sends her a branch of oranges, and the count sends her his usual box of roses. She meditates over these, and two visions arise. On the right she sees herself dancing with the count at a grand ball; on the left she sees Jim and herself among the orange trees at home. She decides that she is tired of the count and city life, and hurries home. She finds she is happier there and that she loves Jim the best, after all. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama | Romance

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19 April 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Doesn't strongly convince as romance
1 September 2017 | by See all my reviews

A picture set in Florida orange land and with an interior or two in "the city." It is well acted in part, but doesn't strongly convince as romance. The story is well written on a strictly conventional plot by George Nicholls and produced by him. It makes a passable offering. The leads fall to Ormi Hawley and Edwin Carewe, supported by John Ince and Irving White. The photography is clear. - The Moving Picture World, May 3, 1913


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