Caché (2005) - News Poster

(2005)

News

‘Happy End’ Trailer: Isabelle Huppert and Michael Haneke’s ‘Amour’ Semi-Sequel Probably Isn’t Too Happy — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Happy End’ Trailer: Isabelle Huppert and Michael Haneke’s ‘Amour’ Semi-Sequel Probably Isn’t Too Happy — Watch
Sony Pictures Classics has released the trailer for “Happy End,” Michael Haneke’s semi-sequel to “Amour.” Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant reprise their roles in the film, whose title is almost certainly ironic — Haneke’s movies, like “Funny Games” and “The White Ribbon,” are among the most severe in the world. Watch the trailer below.

Read More:‘Happy End’ Review: In This Quasi-Sequel to ‘Amour,’ Michael Haneke is a Master of Bourgeois Despair

Here’s the synopsis, courtesy of AFI Fest: “The Laurent family has issues. Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant), the aging patriarch of the wealthy Callais clan, is more interested in exiting this world than enjoying it. Anne (Isabelle Huppert) has a repellent adult son to deal with, and Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz) is having a graphic online affair. The match to this tinderbox of dysfunction is adolescent Eve, who moves in after her mother’s apparent suicide attempt, and in
See full article at Indiewire »

Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael…

  • Sydney's Buzz
Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael…
Official Oscar® Submission for Best Foreign Language Film from Austria: ‘Happy Ending’ by Michael Haneke“All around us, the world, and we, in its midst, blind.”The Laurent Family in ‘Happy Ending’A snapshot from the life of a bourgeois European family.

What is Michael Haneke’s vision in this film? We have seen his take on the young Adonises in Funny Games, the most devastating picture of modern sociopathology I have ever seen. And his view of the pathological origin of fascism in The White Ribbon, of the political scandal of the police mass murder and civilians turning a blind eye to the plight of Algerians in France in Cache, on sexual pathology run amock in The Piano Teacher.

Happy Ending features the best actors of a generation and of Haneke’s films, Isabelle Huppert (The Piano Teacher), Jean-Louis Trintignant who played the same character in Amour, is now shown from another angle,
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

‘Happy End’ Review: A Bleak and Twisted Comedy From Michael Haneke [Tiff]

  • Slash Film
‘Happy End’ Review: A Bleak and Twisted Comedy From Michael Haneke [Tiff]
Michael Haneke is not known for light-heartedness. The Austrian filmmaker behind Funny Games, Caché, The White Ribbon, and Amour specializes in challenging, often incredibly bleak dramas where all is not right in the world. So when Haneke’s new film was announced with the title Happy End, most people familiar with the director likely assumed this […]

The post ‘Happy End’ Review: A Bleak and Twisted Comedy From Michael Haneke [Tiff] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Michael Haneke’s Pitiless World: As ‘Happy End’ Debuts at Cannes, Reconsider ‘Caché’

  • Indiewire
Michael Haneke’s Pitiless World: As ‘Happy End’ Debuts at Cannes, Reconsider ‘Caché’
Austrian director Michael Haneke brings his new film, “Happy End,” to the 2017 Cannes Film Festival with a poster of a blue ocean, a French-language clip featuring glum dinner guests, and a wisp of a logline: A European bourgeois family is blind to the wider world around them, including the refugee crisis happening outside their door. But if it’s Haneke, what do we really need to know? This is the filmmaker whose last two films, “Amour” and “The White Ribbon,” won the Palme d’Or. And if this is Haneke, he doesn’t really do happy.

Read More: First Clip from Michael Haneke’s ‘Happy End’ Features a Very Unhappy Dinner Party — Watch

For all of the complexity of Haneke’s films and their refusal to dictate moral clarity, his worldview is consistent and straightforward. In Haneke’s world, society’s crimes and atrocities are not regretful footnotes of history
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2017. Michael Haneke's "Happy End"

  • MUBI
What do you do when you near the end of your life and you have nothing left to live for? That's a question practically tailor-made for Michael Haneke, whose chilly austerity and bleak fatalism has and continues to be something of a trademark. This follow-up to Amour (which won the Palme d’Or in 2012) is imperfect and strange, and finds the Austrian director in an (unusually?) introspective mode, consciously working through images and fragments of his past films. The subject of Haneke’s attention, here, is the wealthy, bourgeois Laurent family, headed by aging patriarch Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant). His daughter Anne (Isabelle Huppert) runs the thriving family business with the help of her somewhat incapable son, Pierre (Franz Rogowski), while Georges' son Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz) is a doctor who recently had a child with Anaïs (Laura Verlinden), his second wife. For a while, the film looks to be the equal
See full article at MUBI »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Happy End’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Happy End’
Michael Haneke is up to his old tricks in “Happy End,” a movie that finds the chilly Austrian maestro returning to obsessions that have haunted his earlier work — from cultural nihilism to bourgeois solipsism, cold-hearted murder to compassionate end-of-life solutions — and in at least one case, continuing a story left unresolved in his previous film, “Amour.”

Although it reunites Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert in uncannily similar father-daughter roles, “Happy End” hardly qualifies as an “Amour” sequel. In fact, if there weren’t already a film called “Loveless” in competition at this year’s Cannes film festival, that would have made an apt title for Haneke’s latest. Certainly, there’s almost no trace of the humane, empathetic sensibility that somehow snuck its way into “Amour” to be found here — which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, considering the director spent most of his career spelunking the ice caves of his own cynicism,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Variety Critics Share Their Cannes Cinematic Wish Lists

Variety Critics Share Their Cannes Cinematic Wish Lists
Variety‘s chief film critics Peter Debruge and Owen Gleiberman look ahead at the Cannes festival lineup and tell us what they really want to see when the festival kicks off May 17.

Peter Debruge’s Picks

The Beguiled

It’s not like the world was asking for a remake of the 1971 Clint Eastwood classic, based on the Thomas Cullinan novel about a wounded Union soldier who bewitches an entire boarding school of lonely Confederate ladies — although now that it exists, consider me intrigued. Certainly, we can expect Sofia Coppola to repair the gender balance, which is the most backwards thing about director Don Siegel’s otherwise intoxicating testosterone-fueled fantasy.

The Florida Project

It’s about time Cannes took note of one of America’s most exciting indie voices, inviting “Tangerine” director Sean Baker into the fold. Apart from a general fascination with strange contemporary subcultures, and a capacity to translate
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Michael Haneke's "Happy End" Gives An Unhappy First Glance

With just about two weeks to go before its seaside premiere at the 70th annual Cannes Film Festival, the first image for Michael Haneke’s Happy End – his latest cold dose of cruel reality – has landed as hard as the realization that one day we will all die, and most likely alone. Of course, Haneke returns to Cannes this year a reigning champ, double-fisting Palmes d’Or after his last films to grace the Competition – The White Ribbon and Amour – emerged victorious. The question on many minds going into this year’s festival is whether he’ll win the top prize for a third time and break the all-time record he holds alongside fellow international auteurs Alf Sjöberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Bille August, Emir Kusturica, Shohei Imamura, the Dardennes brothers, and last year’s surprise winner Ken Loach.

Happy End reunites Haneke with two performers who have arguably given career-best
See full article at FilmExperience »

Spc acquires Michael Haneke’s 'Happy End'

  • ScreenDaily
Spc acquires Michael Haneke’s 'Happy End'
The distributor has picked up North American and Latin American rights to the Austrian auteur’s upcoming French production which wrapped in late August.

Happy End offers a snapshot from the life of a bourgeois European family and reunites Haneke with Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert from his 2012 foreign language Oscar winner Amour, as well as Mathieu Kassovitz and Toby Jones.

A press release issued the following ominous line: “All around us, the world, and we, in its midst, blind.”

Margaret Menegoz produces and Stefan Arndt and Veit Heiduschka co-produce and reprise their functions from Amour and The White Ribbon.

Spc has handled most of Haneke’s recent work, including Amour, The White Ribbon and Caché.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sony Pictures Classics acquires Michael Haneke’s 'Happy End'

  • ScreenDaily
Sony Pictures Classics acquires Michael Haneke’s 'Happy End'
The distributor has picked up North American and Latin American rights to the Austrian auteur’s upcoming French production which wrapped in late August.

Happy End offers a snapshot from the life of a bourgeois European family and reunites Haneke with Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert from his 2012 foreign language Oscar winner Amour, as well as Mathieu Kassovitz and Toby Jones.

A press release issued the following ominous line: “All around us, the world, and we, in its midst, blind.”

Margaret Menegoz produces and Stefan Arndt and Veit Heiduschka co-produce and reprise their functions from Amour and The White Ribbon.

Spc has handled most of Haneke’s recent work, including Amour, The White Ribbon and Caché.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Great Job, Internet!: Read This: Are these the best films of the 21st century?

  • The AV Club
If there’s one thing that pop culture obsessives love doing, it’s making lists. If there’s another thing they love doing, it’s dissecting and arguing about a list made by another pop culture obsessive. What was included? What was overlooked? What ranked way too high and what should’ve ranked higher? These are the questions on which the discussion is built. So today, when the BBC published a list of the top 100 films of the 21st century based on top 10 lists of 177 critics worldwide, controversy was sure to erupt. For starters, here’s the top 25 of the list:

25. ​Memento (Christopher Nolan, 2000)

24. The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012)

23. Caché (Michael Haneke, 2005)

22. Lost In Translation (Sofia Coppola, 2003)

21. The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson, 2014)

20. Synecdoche, New York (Charlie Kaufman, 2008)

19. Mad Max: Fury Road (George ...
See full article at The AV Club »

The 100 Greatest Films of the 21st Century: BBC Polls Critics From Around The Globe

  • Indiewire
The 100 Greatest Films of the 21st Century: BBC Polls Critics From Around The Globe
Last year, the BBC polled a bunch of critics to determine the 100 greatest American films of all time and only six films released after 2000 placed at all. This year, the BBC decided to determine the “new classics,” films from the past 16 years that will likely stand the test of time, so they polled critics from around the globe for their picks of the 100 greatest films of the 21st Century so far. David Lynch’s “Mulholland Dr.” tops the list, Wong Kar-Wai’s “In The Mood For Love” places second, and Paul Thomas Anderson and the Coen Brothers both have 2 films in the top 25. See the full results below.

Read More: The Best Movies of the 21st Century, According to IndieWire’s Film Critics

Though the list itself is fascinating, what’s also compelling are the statistics about the actual list. According to the the BBC, they polled 177 film critics from every continent except Antarctica.
See full article at Indiewire »

Mullholland Drive tops critics' list of best 21st century films

Ryan Lambie Aug 23, 2016

A critics' survey puts Mullholland Drive at the top of the list of the best films since 2000. Did yours make the cut?

Movie critics love Linklater, Studio Ghibli, the Coens and the surrealist stylings of David Lynch. At least, that's if a newly-published list of the 100 greatest films of the 21st century is anything to go by.

BBC Culture commissioned the poll, which took in responses from 177 film critics from all over the world. As a result, the top 100 includes an eclectic mix of the mainstream to independent movies, from dramas to sci-fi and off-beat comedies. Feew would be surprised to see things like Paolo Sorrentino's handsome Italian confection The Great Beauty propping up the lower end of the list, or that such acclaimed directors as Wes Anderson or the aforementioned Coens feature heavily.

What is pleasing to see, though, is how much good genre stuff has made the cut,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 21st Century’s 100 Greatest Films, According to Critics

Although we’re only about 16% into the 21st century thus far, the thousands of films that have been released have provided a worthy selection to reflect on the cinematic offerings as they stand. We’ve chimed in with our favorite animations, comedies, sci-fi films, and have more to come, and now a new critics’ poll that we’ve taken part in has tallied up the 21st century’s 100 greatest films overall.

The BBC has polled 177 critics from around the world, resulting in a variety of selections, led by David Lynch‘s Mulholland Drive. Also in the top 10 was Wong Kar-wai‘s In the Mood For Love and Terrence Malick‘s The Tree of Life, which made my personal ballot (seen at the bottom of the page).

In terms of the years with the most selections, 2012 and 2013 each had 9, while Wes Anderson, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Christopher Nolan, the Coens, Michael Haneke, and
See full article at The Film Stage »

Michael Haneke’s Use of Sound and Silence Explored in New Video Essay

Michael Haneke is a filmmaker who demands his audience’s attention. Known for examining social issues and extensive use of static long-takes depicting characters suffering, he has been called everything from a genius to a sadist. A new video essay by Elsie Walker, titled “Taking Time to Hear: Accented Rests in Michael Haneke’s Cinema,” argues that the director is the opposite of a sadist.

Instead, he is a filmmaker who cares deeply enough for his characters that he takes the time to sit with them through their anguish, their fear, and their exhaustion. By allowing sound, including silences, to take center stage, Haneke is transferring this burden of compassion to his viewers. What results are contemplative, difficult works such as Caché, Funny Games, and Benny’s Video.

Watch the essay below (with a hat tip to The Playlist) as Haneke gets ready to shoot his next film Happy End.
See full article at The Film Stage »

In Happier Cannes Times

on this day in history as it relates to the movies...

1941 Bob Dylan is born in Minnesota, splinters into seven people in front of Todd Haynes' eyes.

1949 Jim Broadbent is born so that we might have Harold Zidler in Moulin Rouge! the film he should have won the Oscar for on the night he actually won the Oscar. Funny how that happens sometimes.

1960 Kristin Scott Thomas is born. Years later she can drop a room temperature or bring it to a boil onscreen in about 2 seconds. We miss her soooo much.

1972 Superhero Glut Producer of the CW, Greg Berlanti, is born.

1991 Thelma & Louise drove into theaters. You've been reading our 25th anniversary retrospective right? Part 3 hits today and we're having a blast revisiting.

2009 The White Ribbon finally wins Michael Haneke the Palme d'Or at Cannes. It goes on to two Oscar nominations for Foreign Film and Cinematography and becomes Haneke's most successful film globally,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Great... Train Robbery, Detective, Balls of Fire

On this day in history as it relates to the movies...

1859 Arthur Conan Doyle is born. Probably rolls over in his grave 150 years later when Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes premieres and the great detective becomes a slo mo action hero

1868 The Great Train Robbery happens. It's the subject of a highly influential 10 minute silent film (embedded above) as soon as people figure out what to do with cameras and celluloid in 1903. Cross-cutting, breaking the fourth wall, inventing the western action movie genre? It's all happening right here. 

1907 Laurence Olivier is born. Not yet a "Sir" but already expecting a cooing audience

1945 Paranormal investigators Lorraine and Ed Warren are married. They become the fab Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson in The Conjuring (2013) and The Conjuring 2 (2016) 

1958 Jerry Lee Lewis tells the world he's married his 13 year old cousin Myra. Later they look just like Dennis Quaid and Winona Ryder in a movie

1967 Brooke Smith,
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Room’ and ‘Frank’ Director Lenny Abrahamson’s 10 Favorite Films

The best-known films of director Lenny Abrahamson, Frank and the quadruple Oscar-nominee Room, follow sad, and in some cases, broken souls as they search and fight for even the tiniest glimpse of happiness. Frank follows a band with an intentionally unpronounceable name, whose lead singer (Michael Fassbender) always wears a fake plastic head, concealing his scarred face from the world. In Room, a mother (Brie Larson) and her young son (Jacob Tremblay) survive a tragic fate, held prisoner in a single room for years on end.

The two films share an acute sensitivity to the lives of characters who struggle to make the best of the often brutal fates with which they’ve been burdened. Abrahamson listed the following ten films as his favorite in 2012’s Sight and Sound poll, a brilliant mixture of stories which as he laments in his quote, could have contained far more than a mere ten selections.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Michael Haneke’s Next Film Will Star Isabelle Huppert and Tackle Immigration in France

  • Vulture
Michael Haneke’s Next Film Will Star Isabelle Huppert and Tackle Immigration in France
Director Michael Haneke's next film, Happy Ending, will star Isabelle Huppert and Jean-Louis Trintignant and deal with themes of migration. Both are favorites of the director (they appeared in his last film, Amour, which won Haneke his second Palme d'Or and the Oscar for Best Foreign-Language Film.) Agence France-Presse reports that Haneke and his team have been scouting out Calais, the northern seaside town where many refugees reside in makeshift camps that have come to be called "the jungle," and plan to begin shooting in the spring. A representative of Pictanovo, which helps finance locally shot films, said that while immigration would be "integrated" into the story. Haneke's 2005 film Caché also dealt with the specter of the migrant when a French couple believes that an Algerian immigrant is leaving threatening videos for them.
See full article at Vulture »

Joel Edgerton Reveals the Thrillers That Inspired Him to Make The Gift

  • BuzzSugar
Joel Edgerton wrote, directed, and stars in The Gift as Gordo, a stalker so creepy that he earned a place on our list of the creepiest movie stalkers of all time. He enlisted Jason Bateman and Rebecca Hall to play Simon and Robyn, a couple who each have their own questionable pasts. When they move back to Simon's hometown, they suddenly find themselves being followed by Simon's old classmate, Gordo. At first he appears to be flattering them with personalized gifts, but then, as all good stalker movies do, it gets creepy. I got a chance to sit down for some one-on-one time with Edgerton and found out about the thrillers that inspired him to make The Gift and what was important to him to include in the movie. Popsugar: What thrillers can you remember having a deep impact on you? Joel Edgerton: The one that really rattled my
See full article at BuzzSugar »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites