The Black Dahlia
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 28 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


In memoriam: the film stars and directors we lost in 2016

30 December 2016 11:16 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

We pay tribute to the film stars and directors from around the world who sadly passed away in 2016.Hector BabencoArgentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco died on July 13 at 70-years-old.He found international success with Brazilian slum drama Pixote (1981), going on to make Kiss Of

We pay tribute to the film stars and directors from around the world who sadly passed away in 2016.

Hector Babenco

Argentine-born Brazilian director Hector Babenco died on July 13 at 70-years-old.

He found international success with Brazilian slum drama Pixote (1981), going on to make Kiss Of The Spider Woman (1985), for which he earned a best director Oscar nominee and William Hurt earned an Oscar win for best actor.

Babenco went on to direct Meryl Streep and Jack Nicholson in Ironweed (1987) and Tom Berenger and John Lithgow in At Play In The Fields Of The Lord (1991).

After undergoing cancer treatment in the 1990s, he returned to the director’s chair for films including Brazilian prison »

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Is the Cecil the most haunted hotel in Los Angeles?

14 November 2016 7:00 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

It played host to serial killers, including the Hillside Strangler, and a death that inspired American Horror Story. Welcome to the most infamous hotel in La

It used to be called the Cecil and its blood-drenched history inspired the 2015 season of American Horror Story. Drug addicts, serial killers, “accidental” slips from very high windows all feature in the popular series and have their roots in the real-life hotel’s past. The Cecil has a dark legacy dating all the way back to the Great Depression.

The Black Dahlia was rumored to have had her last drink at the hotel bar before she turned up dead a few miles away. In 1962, Pauline Otton jumped from a ninth-floor window, killing herself and an unsuspecting George Giannini when she landed on top of him as he walked down the sidewalk. That same year, Julia Moore jumped from an eighth floor window, and Helen »

- Jordan Riefe

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September. It's a Wrap

30 September 2016 3:05 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

While the world continued to be horrifying this past month was a partial joy thanks to Tiff ushering in prestige film season, our favorite time of year, and a particularly good one from the looks of it. Here are a baker's dozen highlights from the month at the blog in case you missed these...

7 Favorites

Isabelle Huppert is Elle -the French icon slays in this tricky movie

Blue Velvet - 30 memorable things on its 30th anniversary 

• Memories of The Blair Witch Project - Team Experience looks back

• The Red Turtle & Courgette - animation is not a genre 

I Could Go On Singing (1963) - Judy Garland's final film 

• The Furniture: Love & Friendship - the country charm of the hit comedy

Moulin Rouge! the musical numbers we're most eager to see reinvisioned for the stage musical version 

7 That Spurred the Most Conversation

• Fences & 20th Century Women -they're finally teasing us 

• Oscar »

- NATHANIEL R

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10th Anniversary: The Black Dahlia

15 September 2016 1:12 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

David looks back at Brian de Palma's wildest film, ten years on from its release.

The Black Dahlia is a curious artefact. It is likely to be remembered simply by virtue of being in the catalogue of Brian de Palma, even if the film’s quality is negligible compared to his biggest hitters Carrie and The Untouchables. When compared to the other famous James Ellroy adaptation, the Oscar-winning L.A. Confidential (which celebrates its own birthday, its 19th, in just a few days), de Palma’s effort certainly pales. In the career of cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond (the film’s sole Oscar nominee), it’s likely to be a footnote in the late man’s incredible career, coming after his work with Spielberg, Cimino and Altman. The film’s stars probably took a year at most to write it off as a failure on all their parts.

Yet the film »

- Dave

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‘Femme Fatale’: Brian De Palma’s Hyperkinetic Bubbling Cocktail

15 September 2016 11:39 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Femme Fatale is a bubbling cocktail of Double Indemnity meets To Catch a Thief meets Vertigo meets The Double Life of Véronique that kicks you in the head real good right at the first sip and is so smooth going down that, by the time you notice you’re drunk, it’s too late to care, and there goes willowy Rebecca Romijn, a nesting doll shedding an archetype. The opening twenty minutes, a jewel theft set at the 1999 Cannes premiere of East/West, are what one might call “pure cinema” — which is to say they are series of hyperkinetic moments strung together through the rhythms of music and editing that could not be captured by any medium other than cinema, or any other filmmaker other than Brian De Palma.

Romijn plays Laure, a master thief who steals a beautiful piece of jewelry (which serves as an elaborate snake-like top, with »

- The Film Stage

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‘The Black Dahlia’: Brian De Palma’s Preposterous, Sordid Noir

24 August 2016 11:26 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

I saw The Black Dahlia the day it opened in the fall of 2006. I can safely say it was one of my favorite moviegoing experiences. My husband and I saw it at AMC River East 21, which is one of Chicago’s largest multiplexes. The showing we went to was sold-out. There must have been 400 people there. The movie started, everyone was quiet and seemed excited for the celeb-packed whodunit we were about to see. Slowly, muffled giggles could be heard from different points of the theatre, mostly whenever Aaron Eckhart or Josh Hartnett mumbled “Fire and Ice.” By the middle of the movie, people were openly laughing at Hartnett’s silly, serious narration. Everyone went ballistic when, referring to the resemblance between Hilary Swank and Black Dahlia Elizabeth Short, Scarlett Johansson yells, “She looks like that dead girl!” We went even more ballistic when a woman sitting near me in the audience screamed, »

- The Film Stage

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RuPaul's Drag Race Star Sharon Needles Examines the Dark Side of Fame in New 'Hollywoodn't' Music Video

5 August 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Sharon Needles can hold tight to her crown as reigning (drag) queen of darkness. The RuPaul's Drag Race alum is back with the music video for her new single "Hollywoodn't," and People has an exclusive first look at the campy clip. "After I went on Drag Race, I was allowed to do so many things," Needles, 34, said in a behind-the-scenes video (below) of the inspiration behind the song. "I was allowed to do theater, commercial work, television work, modeling, fashion design, and it was great. But the thing with reality television fame is that it's got a pretty quick expiration date. »

- Jeff Nelson, @nelson_jeff

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RuPaul's Drag Race Star Sharon Needles Examines the Dark Side of Fame in New 'Hollywoodn't' Music Video

5 August 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Sharon Needles can hold tight to her crown as reigning (drag) queen of darkness. The RuPaul's Drag Race alum is back with the music video for her new single "Hollywoodn't," and People has an exclusive first look at the campy clip. "After I went on Drag Race, I was allowed to do so many things," Needles, 34, said in a behind-the-scenes video (below) of the inspiration behind the song. "I was allowed to do theater, commercial work, television work, modeling, fashion design, and it was great. But the thing with reality television fame is that it's got a pretty quick expiration date. »

- Jeff Nelson, @nelson_jeff

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Exclusive Portraits: Scarlett Johansson Receives Gene Siskel Film Center Renaissance Award

9 July 2016 9:26 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – She’s conquered the box office as the top grossing female star of all time, and she’s had a series of big superhero and prestige films. The Gene Siskel Film Center honored Scarlett Johansson with their Renaissance Award, at the Ritz Carlton in Chicago on June 20th, 2016.

Scarlett Johansson on the Red Carpet on June 20th, 2016

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Johansson was born in New York City, and studied acting at the Professional Children’s School in Manhattan. She made her film debut at the age of nine in “North” (1994), and rose steadily through the ranks as a child/teenage actress in such films as “Manny & Lo” (1996), “The Horse Whisperer” (1998) and “Ghost World” (2001).

She made the transition to more adult roles with the unforgettable “Lost in Translation” (2003), opposite Bill Murray, and further stole the screen in the Woody Allen-directed “Match Point »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Pepe Serna Joins Matt Damon in Alexander Payne’s ‘Downsizing’ (Exclusive)

1 July 2016 2:36 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Veteran character actor Pepe Serna has joined the cast in Alexander Payne’s satire “Downsizing,” joining Matt Damon, Kristen Wiig, Christoph Waltz and Hong Chau, Variety has learned exclusively.

The Paramount film, currently shooting in Toronto, centers on an Omaha man who joins the throngs of people undergoing a new process that reduces humans to a tiny fraction of their size. Then they move to one of the many communities of small people that are sprouting up around the world.

“It’s the smallest part I’ve ever had, four inches to be exact,” Serna said.

Payne is co-writing the script with Jim Taylor. The duo won an Oscar for best adapted screenplay for “Sideways” and collaborated on the scripts for “Citizen Ruth,” “Election,” “Jurassic Park III,” “About Schmidt” and “I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry.”

Downsizing” is produced by Payne and Mark Johnson and will begin production this spring. »

- Dave McNary

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‘Greetings’: Brian De Palma’s Splintering of Masculinity

29 June 2016 9:09 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

“This is a pretty good land, a fact” was proclaimed by President Lyndon B. Johnson in a television broadcast addressing the Vietnam War — the leader of the free world backing up a “humble” if contentious wording of his nation’s state with an absolute, and thus already opening up the possibility of not just satire, but images as the ultimate medium for telling lies. Perhaps it was the ultimate “prologue” for a 28-year-old Brian De Palma.

With the mission statement of setting out to make something akin to Jean-Luc Godard’s ’60s work, De Palma’s third feature, Greetings, still feels surprisingly his own; his preoccupations already so dominant that it doesn’t come off as a banalization of Godard’s aesthetics and ideas the way so many other rip-offs did. Perhaps the difference is that it’s based in a very personal milieu, situated around three New York buddies »

- Ethan Vestby

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NYC Weekend Watch: ‘The Puppetmaster,’ David Bordwell, ‘The King of Comedy’ & More

23 June 2016 10:03 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of Modern Art

The Mark Lee Ping-Bing retro has its last weekend, with titles including Hou Hsiao-hsien‘s Dust in the Wind and his rarely screened The Puppetmaster.

Museum of the Moving Image

“David Bordwell: How 1940s Critics Changed American Film Culture” offers a crash course in one sliver of film history. Citizen Kane »

- Nick Newman

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‘Dressed To Kill’: Brian De Palma’s Cathartic Dream of Shame and Fatalism

20 June 2016 12:11 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

“It’s very dirty, and I know dirty.” Near the end of Brian De Palma’s oneiric exercise in sleaze, Dressed To Kill, high-class prostitute Liz Blake (Nancy Allen) recounts a recurring dream where she strips in front of a phantom intruder before he puts a razor blade to her neck. It’s remarkably similar to the film’s first scene — a dream sequence where a showering Kate Miller (Angie Dickinson) vainly attempts to attract her shaving husband’s attention, only to be murdered behind a thin veil of glass.

This time, it’s notably described in real-time as Blake’s voice becomes shaky. She’s a women who’s used to sexual kinks, but this dream is something more confusing. It’s threatening, but also cathartic in the details.

But for a film obsessed with the presence of skin and the possibility of sex, Dressed to Kill is excessively »

- Michael Snydel

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Watch Martin Scorsese and Brian De Palma’s 45-Minute Talk on The Dick Cavett Show

20 June 2016 9:11 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

It’s a Brian De Palma kind of month, with most people giving their two cents on the auteur after having seen Jake Paltrow and Noah Baumbach‘s documentary, De Palma. We also recently launched a career-spanning series in which we will look at all of his films over the summer. De Palma is one of the more polarizing filmmakers around – one day he makes masterful filmmaking such as Blow Out, Dressed to Kill, and Carrie and then he pulls out a Mission To Mars or the quasi-unwatchable Bonfire of the Vanities.

De Palma’s best movie Blow Out, a riff/tribute to Antonioni’s Blow-Up, was a smart, hallucinatory take on voyeurism. John Travolta and De Palma evoked Hitchcockian tradition in the best of ways. It’s also the best performance from the actor we’ll likely ever see.

The 75 year-old De Palma seems to be everywhere these days. »

- The Film Stage

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The Summer of De Palma: A Career-Spanning Retrospective

17 June 2016 12:24 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Bringing up Brian De Palma as if he’s still some kind of marginalized or misunderstood figure is now heavily contentious, not just in the sense that “the discussion” has, with the presence of the Internet, become so heavily splintered that every figure has at least seem some form of reappraisal, but in that this is being discussed on the occasion of a new documentary and retrospectives in New York, Chicago, Austin, and Toronto (the lattermost of which this symposium will be timed to). Yes, the line has probably tipped past “divisive,” but that doesn’t mean there still isn’t room for debate.

It’s not hard to understand why De Palma’s work strikes a cord with a new cinephilia fixated on form and vulgarity. Though, in going film-by-film — taking us from political diatribes against America to gonzo horror to gangster films your parents watch to strange European »

- Ethan Vestby

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Preview of The Black Dahlia Ogn

5 June 2016 7:30 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This Wednesday sees the release of The Black Dahlia original graphic novel adaptation of James Ellroy’s book, and we have a preview for you here courtesy of Archaia…

What’s to Love: This gripping graphic novel adaptation of the highly acclaimed book by James Ellroy, The Black Dahlia, delves deeply into one of the most haunting unsolved crimes in American history. Award-winning filmmaker David Fincher (Gone Girl, Zodiac) and acclaimed storyteller Matz (The Killer) worked at length to preserve much of Ellroy’s original dialogue while bringing the stark images of 1940s L.A. to full, living color with illustrator Miles Hyman.

What It Is: Lapd investigators Bucky Bleichert and Lee Blanchard find themselves enthralled with the mysterious and brutal murder of a beautiful young woman, Elizabeth Short. Their obsession takes a dark turn as they delve into the underbelly of Hollywood and the heart of the dead woman’s tortured and twisted past. »

- Gary Collinson

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‘De Palma’ Trailer: The Influential ‘Scarface’ Director Recounts His Career in a New Doc

20 April 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Director Brian De Palma is one of the most influential and iconic directors that cinema has ever seen. His body of work includes films such as Scarface, Carrie, Blow Out, The Untouchables, Casualties of War, Mission: Impossible, Snake Eyes, The Black Dahlia, Carlito’s Way and most recently, Passion. Now the filmmaker himself dives into his […]

The post ‘De Palma’ Trailer: The Influential ‘Scarface’ Director Recounts His Career in a New Doc appeared first on /Film. »

- Ethan Anderton

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25 great music scores composed for not very good movies

29 March 2016 3:26 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Some brilliant scores accompany movies that don't always deserve them. Here are 25 examples...

Can a film soundtrack rescue a movie that is otherwise a lost cause? One thing’s for sure: throughout the history of cinema, music has often been the redeeming feature of many an underwhelming movie. Here are 25 amazing film scores composed for films that, frankly, didn’t deserve them.

25) Meet Joe Black (Thomas Newman, 1998)

This somnambulistic three hour romantic drama should really feature an extra screen credit for star Brad Pitt’s fetishised blonde locks. Rising way above the torpid melodrama of the plot is one of Thomas Newman’s most hauntingly melodic and attractive scores, one that leaves his characteristic quirkiness at the door to paint a portrait of death that is both melancholy and hopeful. The spectacular 10-minute finale That Next Place remains one of Newman’s towering musical achievements.

24) Timeline (Brian Tyler, »

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The 25 most underrated film scores of the 2000s

3 March 2016 12:47 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Diverse, awe-inspiring and memorable treasures that have sadly fallen off the radar

The noughties were a tough decade for film music fans. Not only was there the unprecedented loss of four great masters in the form of Jerry Goldsmith, Elmer Bernstein, Michael Kamen and Basil Poledouris; the nature of the industry itself began to go through some seismic changes, not all of them for the better.

With the art of film scoring becoming ever more processed, driven increasingly by ghost writers, electronic augmentation and temp tracks, prospects looked bleak. However, this shouldn’t shield the fact that there were some blindingly brilliant scores composed during this period. Here’s but a small sampling of them.

25. The Departed (Howard Shore, 2006)

When it came to the sound of his Oscar-winning crime thriller, director Martin Scorsese hit on the inspired notion of having composer Howard Shore base it around a tango, »

- simonbrew

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Oscar-winning cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond has died by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2016-01-05 22:58:54

5 January 2016 2:58 PM, PST | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

Vilmos Zsigmond shot François Truffaut and Bob Balaban in Close Encounters Of The Third Kind

Cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond, who won an Oscar for his work on Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters Of The Third Kind, died on New Year's Day at his home in Big Sur, California at the age of 85. The legendary collaborator with Robert Altman (McCabe And Mrs. Miller, The Long Goodbye), Brian De Palma (Blow Out. Obsession, The Bonfire Of The Vanities) and Woody Allen (Cassandra’s Dream, You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger, Melinda And Melinda), also received Oscar nominations for Michael Cimino’s The Deer Hunter, Mark Rydell's The River and De Palma's The Black Dahlia. The Cannes Film Festival in 2014 presented him with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

Vilmos Zsigmond, with fellow cinematographer Yuri Neyman (Liquid Sky) founded the Global Cinematography Institute in 2012. Two-time Oscar-winning cinematographer Haskell Wexler for Hal Ashby's »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

1-20 of 28 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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