6.4/10
34
1 user 3 critic

Dix-sept ans (2003)

At seventeen, looking much younger, Jean-Benoît serves an apprenticeship as a diesel fitter mechanic. He is a troubled youngster, who has never really recovered from the untimely death of ... See full summary »

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Evelyne Durand ...
Herself : Jean-Benoît's mother
Jean-Benoît Durand ...
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Helena Paris ...
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Storyline

At seventeen, looking much younger, Jean-Benoît serves an apprenticeship as a diesel fitter mechanic. He is a troubled youngster, who has never really recovered from the untimely death of his father and has conflicting relationships with his mother.On the other hand, having a girlfriend, Héléna, more mature than him, as well as learning a trade may help him to rebuild his shattered personality. Written by Guy Bellinger

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10 March 2004 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Seventeen  »

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1.66 : 1
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The film was shot over a 27 months period. See more »

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Portrait of an auto-mechanic as a young man
29 April 2006 | by (Oakland CA) – See all my reviews

French teenager Jean-Benoit Durand is the subject of this slow paced but always interesting documentary from director Didier Nion. We first meet Durand as a brash adolescent puffing on a gaulloise, desperately trying to look more mature than he is. Jean-Benoit's background is a troubled one: he comes from a broken home, has a hair trigger temper, and has little time for school. Working in his favor is an interest in auto mechanics and Helena, his loyal straight arrow girlfriend. The film follows Jean-Benoit as he attempts to parlay an apprenticeship into a career and a much needed technical degree. Needless to say, his bad attitude gets in the way, but by film's end we get the distinct impression that he's finally turned the corner. Nion's fly on the wall camera is never intrusive, even when he confronts Jean-Benoit about his self destructive tendencies, and the result is a very honest and watchable look at French teenage life.


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