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The Legend of Zorro (2005) Poster

Trivia

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A second sequel was dropped, due to this film not making enough money. However, Robert Rodriguez approached Sony with an idea that the Zorro reboot should be set in a post-apocalyptic future. But, Sony executives wanted the Zorro reboot to be gritty and be in the style of The Dark Knight (2008), showing how Don Diego de la Vega became Zorro. Batman was heavily influenced by Zorro. The reboot was rumoured to be titled "Zorro Reborn".
Adrian Alonso, who plays Joaquín, did not know English, so he learned all his lines phonetically, just as Antonio Banderas did for The Mambo Kings (1992).
The sequel went through many titles. It was originally called "The Mask Of Zorro 2" and then that title was changed to "Zorro Unmasked" which had been the original script title by Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio. After their script was not used the title went to "Zorro 2" then to "The Return Of Zorro" before Sony pictures finally settled on the title "Legend Of Zorro".
Contrary to false claims, Antonio Banderas is not the first Spanish actor to portray Zorro. Spanish actor José Suárez portrayed Zorro several decades earlier in the 1953 film Lawless Mountain (1953), who is followed by another Spanish actor Carlos Quiney in three 1970s films Zorro's Latest Adventure (1969), Zorro, Rider of Vengeance (1971), and Zorro the Invincible (1971). Banderas is also not the first Latino actor to portray Zorro; he is preceded by other Latinos such as Rafael Bertrand (1964), Rodolfo de Anda (1976), and Henry Darrow (1980s).
Directors Steven Spielberg and Robert Rodriguez both passed on the project. However, Spielberg stayed on as an executive producer.
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Tony Amendola, who played "Don Luis" in The Mask of Zorro (1998), plays "Father Quintero" in this movie, its sequel.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The locomotive used on the train at the end of the film was not actually capable of moving under its own power. The illusion of it pulling the train was created by alternately using an out-of-vision diesel locomotive to pull or push, a blue screen set up next to the steam locomotive with passing scenery added later, or an about 1/8 scale operable model of the train.
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When Alejandro and Count Armand play polo, the game essentially turns into a jousting match. Rufus Sewell (Count Armand) played Count Adamar, a professional jouster, in 'A Knight's Tale'. In both movies, he turns what should be a blunt object into a sharp-pointed object in an attempt to cheat and win the match.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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