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9 items from 2016


Where to Invade Next review – smirk alarm

12 June 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Michael Moore insults his audience with this attempt to improve America with policies appropriated from Europe

Michael Moore repackages the smug, disingenuous approach that he brought to the topic of healthcare in Sicko and broadens it out to cover the whole gamut of America’s social ills. In this smirking travelogue, he lumbers around Europe brandishing an American flag and a can of Coca-Cola, appropriating ideas and policies that he would like to see back in the Us. And while the Finnish education system, Italian paid holidays and Iceland’s robust approach to its own banking crisis should be a cause for pride for each of those countries, Moore’s partisan and simplistic approach feels more like a big, fat insult to audience intelligence rather than an effective call to arms.

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- Wendy Ide

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Michael Moore films ranked from worst to best

10 June 2016 8:30 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Matthew Lee ranks Michael Moore’s films from worst to best…

Where to Invade Next? opens up in UK theatres today [read our review here]. Here at Flickering Myth I thought it’d be worthwhile to look back on the controversial filmmakers work to see if Michael Moore’s sentiment still holds up. Did some of his warnings come to fruition, or was it all sensationalism? Does Moore warrant such backlashes? And how sentimental is he truly? In short, below is the man’s list.

8 – Slacker Uprising

This will be brief entry for his most forgettable to-date film (I also bet some of you have never heard of this film), as I shall highlight why this is also Michael Moore’s worst.

Plot: Michael Moore travels across the country to various college and university campuses to get the slacking youth off of their sofas, and into the voting booths to get George W. Bush out of office. »

- Matthew Lee

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Where to Invade Next review – Moore's upbeat socialism is a welcome corrective

9 June 2016 2:15 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Invading various countries to bring their socially responsible ideas back to the Us, Michael Moore’s bracing new doc is doggedly simple, and valuable

This isn’t what you might expect, though it’s quite in line with what Michael Moore has said before. There’s a more positive, upbeat note than usual, though. Moore has created a punchy and exhilarating tribute to the various liberal-welfarist traditions of nations from Europe and elsewhere. He cheerfully tours around, “invading” these countries and pinching their good ideas, with a view to bringing them back to the Us, ideas such as France’s healthy school meals, Italy’s statutory paid holidays and Germany’s worker participation in boardrooms – defending them as tax-efficient and socially necessary.

This movie is a cousin to his excellent Sicko, an attack on America’s private health insurance, and in its scepticism about America’s military spending it’s »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Where to Invade Next Review

7 June 2016 2:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

There may not be a more controversial filmmaker in the world than Michael Moore.  The politically-minded documentarian has plenty of detractors, thanks to a slew of anti-establishment films that satirically poke holes in the concept of American exceptionalism. He’s covered gun control (Bowling For Columbine), the fractured health care system (Sicko), and the war on […]

The post Where to Invade Next Review appeared first on HeyUGuys. »

- Damen Norton

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Review: 'A Monster With a Thousand Heads' Is an Urgently Universal Healthcare Thriller

12 May 2016 12:45 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Healthcare — at least in this country — is a conspiracy thriller unto itself, and trying to get reimbursed for medical treatments can make the average person feel like they're living through their own personal remake of "Z." Even with the current administration's historic push towards accessibility, there's still something fundamentally disquieting about a bureaucracy of human life. While a number of films have confronted viewers with the horrifying facts and mordant absurdities of the process (Michael Moore's "Sicko" naturally being the first that comes to mind), Rodrigo Plá's intermittently engaging "A Monster With a Thousand Heads" is unique for how it captures the urgency of a system that's designed to frustrate and confuse people into helplessness. Shorter than an average phone call with your insurance provider (the closing credits begin at the 69-minute mark), Plá's film is set in Mexico, where universal healthcare was allegedly »

- David Ehrlich

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Where to Invade Next

29 April 2016 5:22 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

America's favorite gadfly has made something worth watching -- a European tour of Great Ideas that American would do well to steal outright -- even if many of those ideas originated here. Not that anyone will listen, but Hail the Conquering Hero just the same. Where to Invade Next Blu-ray Anchor Bay 2015 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 120 min. / Street Date May 10, 2016 / 29.99 Starring Michael Moore Cinematography Rick Rowley, Jayme Roy Film Editors Pablo Proenza, Todd Woody Richman, Tyler H. Walk Produced by Carl Deal, Tia Lessin, Michael Moore Directed by Michael Moore

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Hate Michael Moore? Hate Michael Moore movies? Although Moore-o-phobes will think the title sounds like another Moore snark-fest about America's penchant for warfare, his newest picture Where to Invade Next is fundamentally unlike any of his earlier hits. It's also as (gasp) politically neutral as a sane movie can be. It's charming and uplifting, qualifiers I don't normally associate with Moore. »

- Glenn Erickson

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Where To Invade Next – The Review

12 February 2016 6:04 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Filmmaker Michael Moore returns to a more comic touch with Where To Invade Next, an election-season-perfect tour of life in other developed countries which maybe Moore’s funniest in years. Moore’s last film, Capitalism: A Love Story, took a rather grim look at America’s economic system but Where To Invade Next recalls Moore’s earlier playful troublemaker, uncovering ironies and overlooked facts, as he did in Bowling For Columbine and Roger And Me, although this film continues some thoughts from previous films. In Where To Invade Next, Moore starts with the U.S.’s penchant react with military force, and fashions himself into a one-man army to “invade” various countries on America’s behalf in order to “take things we need.” In this case, those countries are other developed nations and those things are not oil or other resources but their good ideas to solving our myriad domestic problems. »

- Cate Marquis

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Where to Invade Next documentary review: finding the American dream everywhere but America

9 February 2016 12:33 PM, PST | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

Michael Moore doesn’t hate America. But he does wonder how other nations are doing so many things better than the supposed greatest country in the world. I’m “biast” (pro): love Michael Moore

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Alas, the Americans who really really really need to see this movie will go out of their way to avoid it.

I’m talking about the people who get all of their “news” from Fox, and “know” that Norway and Italy are communist hellholes where everyone waits in line for toilet paper and can’t get their blood pressure checked without permission from the government and an appointment 18 months out. These people also “know” — because Fox News has kindly informed them of this — that rabble-rousing documentarian Michael Moore hates America. Obviously. Because criticism of one’s homeland in the hopes »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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Michael Moore Scolds Obama for Not Visiting Flint

21 January 2016 6:57 AM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Flint, Mich. native Michael Moore scolded President Obama for coming within an hour of his hometown, but not making a personal visit there to address its water crisis. On a visit to Detroit Wednesday, the president pledged to have “all the people of Flint’s back” as residents there deal with poisonous, lead-contaminated tap water. But the “Fahrenheit 9/11” and “Sicko” filmmaker noted that Obama didn’t go the extra mile (actually 68 miles, by Interstate 75) to visit Flint. In a series of tweets, Moore compared Obama’s treatment of Flint to President Bush’s flyover of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. »

- Tim Molloy

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

9 items from 2016


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