Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (2006) Poster

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  • When Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) are arrested by Lord Cutler Beckett () of the East India Trading Co for helping notorious pirate Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) escape from the British navy, Will is told that the only way he can effect Elizabeth's release is by finding Sparrow, obtaining from him his seemingly broken compass, and bringing it to Beckett. Meanwhile, Jack has his own problems searching for a key that will unlock the locker of Davy Jones (Bill Nighy), captain of the legendary ghost ship The Flying Dutchman and release Jack from a blood debt he made to Jones 13 years ago. When their paths cross, it spells nothing but trouble for Will, Jack, and Elizabeth.

  • Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest is based on a screenplay by writers Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, who based their screenplay on the "Pirates of the Caribbean" ride at the Disneyland theme park. It is the second movie in a series of five Pirates of the Caribbean movies, the first being Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003) (2003). Dead Man's Chest is followed by Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (2007) (2007), Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011) (2011), and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017) (2017). Pirates of the Caribbean 6 is announced with no release date set. Note: Dead Man's Chest and At World's End are two parts of an overall filmic episode involving Davy Jones as the principal antagonist.

  • Jack went into the prison to find the drawing of the Key to the Dead Man's Chest. Little is known of the key other than what it opens. So, before Jack could search for it, he needed to know what it looks like.

  • In the writer's commentary for the DVD, Terry Rossio states that once summoned, the Kraken hunts down its target and destroys him and his possessions.

  • One of the fishermen is talking in Turkish, the other one is talking in Greek, albeit in the Greek-Cypriot dialect. The Greek-Cypriot fisherman is commanding the Turkish fisherman to hand him the hat. He then puts it on his head and says that he is a proper dandy. After the kraken makes its presence felt, the Greek-Cypriot fisherman says that he doesn't want the hat, and that the other fisherman should have it. The word the Greek-Cypriot fisherman uses for dandy is an anachronism, since the word "magkas" was introduced into Greek sometime in the 19th century (some sources claim earlier), but, nevertheless, back then it referred to a specific kind of social outcast; it therefore had a negative meaning. In the 20th century, the meaning of "magkas" kept changing with each generation, and it wasn't until the late 20th century that the word "magkas" was also used when referring to a dandy. Its other contemporary meaning is that of a fearless person.

  • The answer to this question is never revealed, but the possibilities are: (1) Jack cut Beckett during a sword fight, leaving him with a hideous scar (or possibly as a eunuch), or (2) seeing as how hubris of the British officers seems to allow Jack to outsmart them quite easily, this left a black mark on Beckett's pristine record as an officer and made him look like a fool.

  • Although the first Aztec curse that was on the pirates of the Black Pearl is broken, Jack the monkey can be seen stealing a coin from the treasure chest in a brief scene after the credits of Curse of the Black Pearl. His theft brings a curse upon himself and this time only himself.

  • The game is a variant of Liar's Dice. Each player rolls five dice. They must bid how many of each amount have been rolled on the fifteen dice, but they may only see their own dice. Bids get increased until a bid is challenged. Each player rolls:

    Davy Jones: 4, 5, 5, 5, 5

    Will: 1, 2, 5, 5, 5

    Bootstrap Bill: 2, 2, 2, 3, 3

    So there is one 1, four 2s, two 3s, one 4, seven 5s and zero 6s.

    Bill bids three 2s; he knows this to be correct as there are three 2s in his own five dice.

    Jones bids four 4s, a risky bid as he can only see his one 4. If Will had challenged this bid, he would have won the game.

    Will bids four 5s.

    Bill bids six 3s.

    Jones bids seven 5s. This is an unbeatable bid.

    Will bids eight 5s. Jones seems certain that this is too high. It is, but given that he can see four of his dice are showing 5, there is still a decent chance that four of the other ten could show a 5 also.

    Bill knows that he has zero 5s and that it is very unlikely that eight of the other ten dice are showing a 5. So he bids twelve 5s, losing on purpose to save Will's soul.

  • Many people seem to think this part is pointless but it is very much pivotal. After Bootstrap tells Jack that the Kraken is after him, Jack needs to find land so that he's safe from the beast. He discovers, however, that he's not safe on land either—not just because of savage tribes but also because the East India Trading Company is colonizing the island. (He finds their logo on some merchandise inside one of the huts.) Jack realizes that soon all islands in the Caribbean will be under the control of his enemies. We learn that Jack can't stay on land or the sea, and therefore his only option is to find the dead man's chest and the key to open it so he can kill Davy Jones. The main complaint about the cannibal island scene is that it drags out too long. However, as mentioned above, it is part of the plot.

  • Realizing that the Kraken is after Jack and not the Pearl nor its crew, Elizabeth distracts Jack with a kiss while shackling his hand to the mast. The survivors then abandon the ship and take the longboat to shore, Elizabeth telling them that Jack chose to stay behind to give them time to escape. Jack manages to break out of the shackle by greasing his wrist with lamp oil, but the Kraken attacks the Pearl once again, this time taking the ship and Jack with it to the watery depths below. Watching from a distance on the Flying Dutchman, Jones opens the chest and is angered when he finds it empty, his heart having been taken by Norrington (Jack Davenport) and delivered to Beckett in hopes of gaining his pardon. Will, Elizabeth, and the remaining crewmen (Gibbs (Kevin McNally), Pintel (Lee Arenberg), Ragetti (Mackenzie Crook), Marty (Martin Klebba), and Cotton (David Bailie) return to Tia Dalma (Naomie Harris) and drink a sorrowful toast "to Captain Jack...a gentleman of fortune...a good man." In the final scene, Tia Dalma asks whether they would be willing to travel to World's End, the gateway to Davy Jones' locker in order to rescue Jack, and everyone agrees. "Then you will need a captain who knows those waters," she says. Footsteps sound on the stairs and, to everyone's surprise, in walks Captain Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush) with Jack, the little monkey, on his shoulder.

  • Yes, like the first film we get a bonus scene after the credits. This time it's not important to the plot. It shows the dog as king of the Cannibal tribe as they worship him like they did with Jack right before they tried to eat him.

  • The likely explanation is that Jack assumed he'd be able to talk his way out of the debt or repay it another way (as he tries in this film). It's also possible he planned on using the ship to gain enough plunder to retire and never set sail on the ocean again and therefore not have to worry about Davy Jones or the Kraken hunting him down. But given that Barbossa mutinied and Jack lost the Pearl for 10 years, he spent most of his time trying to get the ship back in his possession. Once he did, he had less than a year to come up with a plan to save his skin from owing his debt to Davy Jones. That's why this film starts with Jack neglecting his duties as a pirate and is on a mission to find the heart of Davy Jones.

  • The compass works as it's supposed to. But as Tia Dalma says "Jack Sparrow doesn't know what he wants! Or is it that you know what you want, but are loath to claim it as your own?". This is as close to an explanation as we get for why the compass doesn't work for Jack. The best summary is that Jack wanted many things all at once and each one had a counter-point that caused him not to want it also. For example;

    (1) Jack knew his 13 years as Captain of the Black Pearl were coming to an end and his debt to Davy Jones would be called to collect, so he needed to find the chest of Davy Jones, but knew he'd have to neglect being an "honest pirate" to find it. Jack also may have known he'd have to kill Jones and carve out his own heart to put in the chest, which may have been unappealing to him.

    (2) Jack loves sailing the sea, but knowing that Jones would send the Kraken to hunt him down when his debt was owed, Jack needed to stay on land to avoid this.

    (3) Jack had feelings for Elizabeth, but knew she was with Will. Also, being that she was residing in Port Royal, which he'd be arrested and hanged if he ever returned, knew he couldn't return to her, but he also didn't want to be away from her.

    (4) A combination of all the previous answers. Jack wanted to save himself, but he knew he'd have to betray his friends and the woman he had feelings for by risking their lives and manipulating them in to helping him find the items he needed. Something he was very much reluctant to do.

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