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11 items from 2009


The Weird Brilliance of 'Mary and Max'

9 December 2009 1:18 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

By Steve Pond

With “The Princess and the Frog” winning rave reviews and “Fantastic Mr. Fox” popping up on 10-best lists, it’s time to lobby for “Mary and Max,” one of the strangest, funniest films of the year and an oddity that stands out in what has been a good year for animated features.

Made in Australia by Adam Elliot, who won an Oscar for his short film “Harvie Krumpet” six years ago, “Mary and Max” is a twisted claymation film defiantly not for kids. Mary (voiced by Toni Collette) is a lonely eight-year-old girl from the Melb »

- Steve Pond

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Feature Trailer For Adam Elliot’s Mary And Max

23 October 2009 12:21 PM, PDT | Beyond Hollywood | See recent Beyond Hollywood news »

Boy, oh boy, do I love me some stop-motion animation. Be it “Creature Comforts,” “Coraline,” or even, God help me, “Monkeybone,” I’m always down for some meticulously-crafted, old-fashioned storytelling. While mindlessly digging through content over at Trailer Addict, I happened upon a preview for “Harvie Krumpet” director Adam Elliot’s engaging effort “Mary and Max,” a movie which seems to blend the snazziest elements of Henry Selick and Nick Park into one charming little picture. I haven’t seen a Region 1 DVD release date yet, though I strongly suspect it should be coming down the proverbial pipeline pretty soon, as it’s already been unleashed in other territories. However, according to the official website, “Mary and Max” is screening on Sundance Selects throughout USA – via Brighthouse, Cablevision, Comcast, Fox, and Time Warner – as of 14 October 2009. For those interested parties, an official synopsis: Spanning 20 years and 2 continents, Mary and Max »

- Todd

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Mary And Max Review

18 October 2009 9:14 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

It was created with Claymation, its main characters speak with adorable accents, and funny-looking animals are involved - but “Wallace and Gromit” this ain’t.

Director Adam Elliot won an Oscar for 2003’s “Harvie Krumpet”, a 23-minute animated short about a one-testicled, Tourette’s-ridden World War II survivor and animal rights activist, and he brings that same gift for unique characters and melancholy overtones to his debut full-length feature “Mary and Max”. My review after the jump:

Mary and Max” is an unusual, difficult-to-describe movie, to say the least. The broad strokes go like this: Mary Daisy Dinkle, a crushingly lonely eight-year-old Australian girl with a largely absentee father and an overbearing monster for a mother, goes thumbing through a post office phone book, chooses a random name - Max Jerry Horovitz of New York - and sends him a letter, thus beginning a long transcontinental friendship.

It’s a »

- Jeff Giles

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New Trailer for Acclaimed Claymation Film Mary and Max

16 October 2009 9:44 AM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

When the claymation film Mary and Max premiered at Sundance in January, it was met with great acclaim. (It's currently at 95% at Rottentomatoes.)  The film marks the feature debut of Adam Elliot, who won an Oscar with his short film Harvie Krumpet. It tells the story of an unlikely friendship. Mary is a young Australian girl with no friends. She becomes penpals with Max, an aging and obese man from New York who has a great number of neurosis and insecurities. The film's style is a bit visually goofy but also touching and surprisingly effective. There's a new trailer for the film, which is now available On Demand; watch it after the break. The film's primary voices are by Toni Collette (Mary) and Philip Seymour Hoffman (Max) but you'd have a difficult time pegging either one right off, as they're both deep in character. (Hoffman is a bit easier to »

- Russ Fischer

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Mary And Max Premieres October 14, 2009 on Most Cable Providers via Sundance Selects On-Demand

23 September 2009 12:38 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Mary and Max” was the opening night selection at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. The film was a clayography feature from writer/director Adam Elliot and producer Melanie Coombs and it told a very unusual story about a pen-pal relationship between two very different people: Mary Dinkle (Toni Collette), a chubby, lonely 8-year-old living in the suburbs of Melbourne, Australia; and Max Horovitz (Phillip Seymour Hoffman), a severely obese, 44-year-old Jewish man with Asperger’s Syndrome living in New York City. While the film didn’t get stellar reviews, it was a good movie that deserved to be seen. Thankfully, while it isn’t getting a theatrical release, I’ve just found out the film will premiere nationwide on most cable systems on October 14th, 2009 via Sundance Selects on-demand. More after the jump:

The first thing I suggest doing is watching some clips and the trailer from “Mary and Max” here. »

- Steve 'Frosty' Weintraub

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"Mary and Max" - Sundance Film Festival review

16 January 2009 1:08 AM, PST | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

"Mary with Max" opens Sundance with an artful bang. The plasticine heroine at the heart of "Mary and Max," Australian filmmaker Adam Elliot's funny, eye-popping and somewhat moody claymation film is eight-year-old Mary Daisy Dinkle (voice of Toni Collette), a social misfit in suburban Australia whose life changes after finding a pen pal in New York City. Her faraway friend is a surprising soul mate, Max Jerry Horowitz (voice of Phillip Seymour Hoffman). He is overweight, a Jewish atheist with Asperger's Syndrome and a social outcast equal to Mary, a most unlikely hero. Both Max and Mary come to life thanks to artful detail and exquisite production design from Elliot, who won an Oscar for his short film "Harvie Krumpet," his photographer Gerald Thompson and an Australian production team of 50 artists responsible for this frequently solemn but always engaging friendship tale, one based on Elliot's own pen pal relationship. »

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"Mary and Max" - Sundance Film Festival review

16 January 2009 1:08 AM, PST | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

"Mary with Max" opens Sundance with an artful bang. The plasticine heroine at the heart of "Mary and Max," Australian filmmaker Adam Elliot's funny, eye-popping and somewhat moody claymation film is eight-year-old Mary Daisy Dinkle (voice of Toni Collette), a social misfit in suburban Australia whose life changes after finding a pen pal in New York City. Her faraway friend is a surprising soul mate, Max Jerry Horowitz (voice of Phillip Seymour Hoffman). He is overweight, a Jewish atheist with Asperger's Syndrome and a social outcast equal to Mary, a most unlikely hero. Both Max and Mary come to life thanks to artful detail and exquisite production design from Elliot, who won an Oscar for his short film "Harvie Krumpet," his photographer Gerald Thompson and an Australian production team of 50 artists responsible for this frequently solemn but always engaging friendship tale, one based on Elliot's own pen pal relationship. »

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"Mary and Max" - Sundance Film Festival review

16 January 2009 1:08 AM, PST | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

"Mary and Max" reviewby Steve Ramos, Writer   "Mary with Max" opens Sundance with an artful bang.   The plasticine heroine at the heart of "Mary and Max," Australian filmmaker Adam Elliot's funny, eye-popping and somewhat moody claymation film is eight-year-old Mary Daisy Dinkle (voice of Toni Collette), a social misfit in suburban Australia whose life changes after finding a pen pal in New York City. Her faraway friend is a surprising soul mate, Max Jerry Horowitz (voice of Phillip Seymour Hoffman). He is overweight, a Jewish atheist with Asperger's Syndrome and a social outcast equal to Mary, a most unlikely hero.   Both Max and Mary come to life thanks to artful detail and exquisite production design from Elliot, who won an Oscar for his short film "Harvie Krumpet," his photographer Gerald Thompson and an Australian production team of 50 artists responsible for this frequently solemn but always engaging friendship tale, one »

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"Mary and Max" - Sundance Film Festival review

16 January 2009 1:08 AM, PST | Upcoming-Movies.com | See recent Upcoming-Movies.com news »

"Mary with Max" opens Sundance with an artful bang. The plasticine heroine at the heart of "Mary and Max," Australian filmmaker Adam Elliot's funny, eye-popping and somewhat moody claymation film is eight-year-old Mary Daisy Dinkle (voice of Toni Collette), a social misfit in suburban Australia whose life changes after finding a pen pal in New York City. Her faraway friend is a surprising soul mate, Max Jerry Horowitz (voice of Phillip Seymour Hoffman). He is overweight, a Jewish atheist with Asperger's Syndrome and a social outcast equal to Mary, a most unlikely hero. Both Max and Mary come to life thanks to artful detail and exquisite production design from Elliot, who won an Oscar for his short film "Harvie Krumpet," his photographer Gerald Thompson and an Australian production team of 50 artists responsible for this frequently solemn but always engaging friendship tale, one based on Elliot's own pen pal relationship. »

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Sundance 2009, Day 1: Mary & Max

15 January 2009 8:34 PM, PST | Pastemagazine.com | See recent PasteMagazine news »

Sundance 2009 is upon us, and like the rest of the world, everything here is upside down. Those of us traveling in from the east, where it's snowy and bitterly cold, are getting the shock of 40-degree weather and dry ground in Park City, Utah, the home of the festival and a town that's usually more recognizable as a frozen filmcicle in late January. This year, the sidewalk and my boots have spontaneously developed a phenomenon called traction, and before the opening night film I made a grocery run in my shirtsleeves.

And as if that weren't enough, the programmers have chosen to kick off the fest with a feature length claymation film called Mary & Max. It's like Wallace and Gromit for grown-ups, or if you've seen Adam Eliot's Oscar-winning short Harvie Krumpet, you'll have an even better idea of what his debut feature is like. In fact Max is something »

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Sundance Opening Night: Mary and Max

15 January 2009 | Comingsoon.net | See recent Comingsoon.net news »

Mary and Max Written and directed by Adam Elliot Voice Cast: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Toni Collette, Eric Bana, Renee Geyer, Ian "Molly" Meldrum, Julie Forsyth, John Flaus Who knows if Adam Elliot's feature debut is the strangest movie that's ever opened the Sundance Film Festival; even if it comes close, it's doubtful you'll find many movies that are nearly as humorous and touching in their humanity as Elliot is able to create using mere clay. After his previous short film "Harvie Krumpet" won the Oscar five years ago, Elliot spent all that time bringing this touching story about a long-distance friendship to life. Mary Daisy Dinkle is an eight-year-old Australian introvert who finds happiness in the smallest things despite being picked on mercilessly »

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11 items from 2009


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