3:10 to Yuma
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1884 (according to the first page of the shooting script). And note the following:

The town of Bisbee was founded in 1880.

The boom town, Contention City, was active only during the 1880s when its three mills processed silver ore from nearby Tombstone.

The Southern Pacific Railroad's tracks reached Yuma in 1870 and bridged the Colorado River in 1877

The Arizona Territorial Prison at Yuma opened in 1876.

Dan Evan's refers to "standing on one leg for three damn years" as the length of time his ranch has been failing after his family relocated from Massachusetts to the Arizona Territory (after his younger son, Mark, had been diagnosed with tuberculosis at the age of two), not to the number of years since the end of the Civil War and the loss of his leg.

Although neither had been the intention of the filmmakers, many viewers have thought the following:

There is no evidence in the short story or the movie. But it is a nice little theory that might explain Ben Wade a lot better than the short story or the movie does.

The way Wade looks at Alice, the green eyes thing and the chance mention of Velvet point us towards Alice being Velvet.

Wade says that he sees himself in William. Evans responds that William got a headstart into decency, which can be interpreted alongwith other things that, William might be Wade's own.

It was an off-white leather variation of a Shell Jacket worn twenty years earlier by Confederate Officers on dress occasions. See a picture on ushist.com here.

All firearms were provided by United States Fire-arms Mfg. Co. Inc. http://www.usfirearms.com/

Detailed photographs of the grip appear on the website of Will Ghormley, the leather artist who designed and produced the holsters for the film (some prop items used in the film are available for sale on Mr Ghormley's website http://www.willghormley-maker.com/310toYuma.html)

Their hats were provided by the venerable Baron's Hats in Burbank, California. The company will custom-make any of the hats made for the movie, including those of Russell Crowe, Peter Fonda, Christian Bale, and Ben Foster. You can email them at Mail@Baronhats.com.

Rumor has it that they also have the original embroidery that was on Ben's hat band, which is very rare, along with its original amulets. They reportedly plan to sell a limited edition of this special hat--making only 31 of them.

Incidentally, Ben Foster's hat was a variation of Robert Redford's from Out of Africa (fitted with a mesa slope crown).

The title of the song used in the film is "The Arizona Killer" (lyrics and melody are by the prolific Arizona folk singer/songwriter, Katie Lee, still performing locally at age 88).

It's a 1995 variation of an older ballad, "The Tennessee Killer" variously described as "Traditional" and an "Ozark Folk Song" (First known appearance: 1942.)


The Arizona Killer.

I killed a man in Dallas, And another in Cheyenne But when I killed the man in Tombstone I overplayed my hand

I rode all night for Tucson To rob the Robles Mine And I left old Arizona With a posse right behind

I rode across the border And there it did not fail The men that was a-follerin' me They soon did lose my trail; they lost my trail

They galloped back to Tucson To get the Cavalry While I stayed on in Mexico Enjoying liberty; Ayi-ha, enjoyed my liberty

I promised my Rosita A pretty dress of blue She said, "You'd go and get it If you really loved me true; did love me true"

So I went back to the border Just to get that gal a dress I killed a man in Guaymas And two in Nogales; killed two in Nogales

But the posse was a-waitin' To get me on the trail Now in Tombstone I'm a layin' In the Cochise County jail; the Cochise County jail

They-re gonna hang me in the morning A'fore this night is done They're gonna hang me in the mornin' And I'll never see the sun

I want to warn you fellers And tell you one by one What makes a gallows rope to swing A woman and a gun

The original 1942 song:


The Tennessee Killer

Oh I've killed men in Georgia, And men in Alabam' But kill a man in Arkansas And God your soul will damn!

I'd killed a man in Memphis In the State of Tennessee, And I rode straight through to Arkansas With a posse after me.

I rode into the Ozarks And there it did not fail, The men that were a-following me They soon did lose the trail.

They rode right back to Memphis In the State of Tennessee, While I stayed in the Ozarks, Enjoyed my liberty.

But I went down to the city For to get my gal a frock, I killed a man in Conway And two in Little Rock.

The sheriff saw me do it, He got the drop on me, I went up to the jail-house, Give up my liberty.

So they'll hang me in the morning, Ere this long night is done, They'll hang me in the morning And I'll never see the sun.

Beware, beware, you fellows, If you must have your fun, Go do it in a harmless way, But do not touch a gun.

The late Mr Welles had fleshed out all the events preceding the hotel room lay-over which comprised most of the 1953 Elmore Leonard short story, and much of Mr Welles' dialogue was incorporated into the current screenplay

Mr Welles had been active in the Writers Guild from the late 1940s to the mid 1970s (specializing in teleplays for "Alfred Hithcock Presents" and "Bonanza" series)

The WGA roster notes that he had died; but no year is listed

It was the same brooch he had removed from Alice's dresser in the bedroom very early in the film (intending to pawn or sell it in Bisbee).

Dan said "I ain't never been no hero, Wade. Only battle I seen, we was in retreat. My foot got shot off by one of my own men. You try telling that story to your boy. See how he looks at you then."

It can be said that Dan was possibly playing Ben's game to keep himself alive and finish his mission.

Was Charlie Prince gay?

There is an implication. McEllroy refers to him as Charlie 'Princess', and gets a bullet in return.

Page last updated by johnallison, 3 years ago
Top 5 Contributors: !!!deleted!!! (7192750), !!!deleted!!! (6531010), second_copilot, gnometree, casselhag

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