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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

20 items from 2017


Berlin Syndrome review – tense psychological thriller

11 June 2017 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A brief romance in the German capital turns into something a lot more sinister

It was meant to be a holiday fling. A crackling connection on the streets of Berlin tumbles into a night of passion, snatched from a packed tourist itinerary. But when Australian photographer Clare (Teresa Palmer) wakes the following morning, she finds that Andi (Max Riemelt) has inadvertently locked her into his apartment. When he returns that night, he is changed – distant, clipped, cold – and she realises he has no intention of letting her go.

Although Cate Shortland (Somersault, Lore) subtly seeds the early part of the film with hints of a threat – Clare’s fascination with Gdr architecture evokes ideas of walls and restrictions on freedom – charming Andi’s true colours still come as a sickening shock. And while the sudden stabs of violence add a genre flavour to this slow-burning thriller, the real discomfort comes »

- Wendy Ide

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Berlin Syndrome review – 'lite' version of kidnap thriller disappoints

8 June 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Cate Shortland’s latest film ticks all the boxes of the captivity psycho-drama, but the lack of originality lets it down

Cate Shortland, the director of the widely admired Somersault, has made an efficient but unrewarding and ultimately pointless psycho-thriller, adapted by Shaun Grant from the 2011 debut novel by Australian author Melanie Joosten. It is set in Berlin, a mecca for backpackers and international hipsters. Clare (Teresa Palmer) is a tourist from Brisbane, wandering around the city, photographing the East German architecture that fascinates her, but feeling a little aimless. She runs into Andi (Max Riemelt), a charming, interesting German guy who chats her up in the street. They go back to his place; the next morning he goes off to work, leaving her to sleep. Clare’s loved-up mood is dispelled, however, when she wakes up and realises he has locked her in his apartment and taken her sim card. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Cate Shortland on her one-night-stand abduction drama Berlin Syndrome

8 June 2017 6:29 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Cinema has often used female characters as mere victims in service of a plot – but the Australian director’s new film is a fascinating interrogation of vulnerability and sexual desire

For as long as cinema has been around, it has been in thrall to the vulnerability of women. Whether they are tied to railway tracks or being stalked in the night, female characters are often victims in service of plot. But for the protagonist of Cate Shortland’s psychological drama, Berlin Syndrome – a young woman whose victimhood is precisely the point – a woman’s vulnerability is the starting point for a fascinating interrogation of that position.

“I love stories about overcoming hurt and how we get through it: ‘How do we continue?’ I like the idea that we’re not static,” the Australian film-maker says. The female protagonists of Shortland’s two previous films – Somersault (2004) and Lore (2012) – are often made vulnerable, »

- Christina Newland

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Movie Review – Berlin Syndrome (2017)

28 May 2017 4:40 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Berlin Syndrome, 2017.

Directed by Cate Shortland.

Starring Teresa Palmer, Max Riemelt, Lucie Aron, Cem Tuncay, Matthias Habich, and Emma Bading.

 

Synopsis:

A passionate holiday romance leads to an obsessive relationship when an Australian photojournalist wakes one morning in a Berlin apartment and is unable to leave.

First impressions are important but never tell someone absolutely everything about a person. Typically, everyone can have secrets, and the charming good-looking guy with a well-paying job in a respectable field is no exception. Berlin Syndrome is unparalleled in presenting the above-described snake of a man; for once in a film you can’t really blame the woman for going off and getting involved with some shady being expressing nefarious motives because here none exist. Andi (Max Riemelt in a groundbreaking performance dependent on his cunning attributes and seduction ability to slip into this nasty, multi-dimensional role) is the guy most girls would be »

- Robert Kojder

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Cate Shortland on putting together 'Berlin Syndrome'

14 May 2017 5:54 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Cate Shortland on the set of 'Berlin Syndrome'..

Australian filmmaker Cate Shortland has only made three features: 2004.s Somersault, 2012.s Lore and now Berlin Syndrome, with the last two both set in Germany.

.Like a lot of people I.m just drawn to the vibrancy of the culture,. says the filmmaker, .and I love living in Berlin..

Shortland.s partner is Australian filmmaker Tony Krawitz (Dead Europe), whose family is German Jew.

.His grandmother is still alive, she.s 102, and she.s from Berlin,. Shortland tells If. .We.ve lived in Berlin on and off for the last six years, our kids went to school there for a while. My German.s still really atrocious but I love living there..

Now the director has shot a feature in the city — adapted by Snowtown.s Shaun Grant from a novel by Melanie Joosten.

Aquarius Films producer Polly Staniford was »

- Harry Windsor

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Australia's best cinematographers gear up for industry's night of nights

2 May 2017 5:32 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Stephen Page and Bonnie Elliott on location (photo credit: Jacob Nash).

Australia.s best DPs are gearing up for the 46th National awards for Cinematography, to be held at Nsw Parliament House this Saturday, May 6.

Again hosted by Ray Martin, the awards will recognize work across 18 categories — student projects, documentary, music videos, TV news and the return of the kids category, CineKids.

.We.re trying to encourage primary-school children up to the age of 15 to get involved, and these kids are coming along in leaps and bounds,. says Acs president Ron Johanson. .I think we have 30-40 members all around Australia — these fantastically talented young kids..

Last year.s expo will not be repeated, says Johanson. .We spoke to the sponsors and they felt they.d give it a miss this year because it.s close to Smpte, so we.ll probably have one next year..

Instead the Acs is »

- Harry Windsor

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Australia's best cinematographers gear up for their night of nights

2 May 2017 5:32 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Stephen Page and Bonnie Elliott on location (photo credit: Jacob Nash).

Australia.s best DPs are gearing up for the 46th National awards for Cinematography, to be held at Nsw Parliament House this Saturday, May 6.

Again hosted by Ray Martin, the awards will recognize work across 18 categories — student projects, documentary, music videos, TV news and the return of the kids category, CineKids.

.We.re trying to encourage primary-school children up to the age of 15 to get involved, and these kids are coming along in leaps and bounds,. says Acs president Ron Johanson. .I think we have 30-40 members all around Australia — these fantastically talented young kids..

Last year.s expo will not be repeated, says Johanson. .We spoke to the sponsors and they felt they.d give it a miss this year because it.s close to Smpte, so we.ll probably have one next year..

Instead the Acs is »

- Harry Windsor

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Jai Courtney Is A Nazi In First Trailer For A24’s ‘The Exception’ With Lily James & Christopher Plummer

24 April 2017 8:30 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

If the career of Sam Worthington — bland and boring in leading man roles, much more interesting when he gets to play character parts in indies like “Somersault” or “The Keeping Room” — was anything to go by, people maybe shouldn’t have been so quick to dismiss his fellow Australian Jai Courtney. Yes, Courtney was a bit of a charisma vacuum in films like “Terminator: Genisys,” but he was a lot more fun when he got to ugly-up in “Suicide Squad” — indeed, he was probably the best thing in the movie.

Continue reading Jai Courtney Is A Nazi In First Trailer For A24’s ‘The Exception’ With Lily James & Christopher Plummer at The Playlist. »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Rn's Jason Di Rosso on Cate Shortland's "dark fairy-tale" 'Berlin Syndrome'

24 April 2017 12:39 AM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Cate Shortland (l) on set.

Imagine you.re a young woman from Brisbane, and you decide to quit your job taking photos for a real estate website, and head overseas for the first time, to the cool city where all the other cool young people seem to be heading —.Berlin. There you meet a really nice guy, you go back to his, you have amazing sex. But fast forward to the morning after and you discover he.s locked you in his creepy apartment, and so begins Berlin Syndrome, a dark fairy-tale of a thriller from Australian director Cate Shortland.

You might remember Cate.s first film, Somersault, which came out in 2004. That film probably rings a bell because you either loved it or hated it — it was dragged into a debate that raged at the time about how Australian cinema was in crisis. It was a particularly ill-informed, mostly »

- Jason Di Rosso

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Teresa Palmer Fights For Freedom In New Trailer For Cate Shortland’s ‘Berlin Syndrome’

28 March 2017 11:48 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Love becomes a prison in “Berlin Syndrome,” the new film from Cate Shortland (“Somersault,” “Lore“) that unwinds a slow-burn thriller about romantic obsession that runs deadly.

Read More: Cate Shortland’s ‘Berlin Syndrome’ Starring Teresa Palmer Is An Unbearably Intense, Slow Burn Thriller [Sundance Review]

Teresa Palmer leads the film as an Australian journalist in Germany who strikes up a relationship with a charming young man.

Continue reading Teresa Palmer Fights For Freedom In New Trailer For Cate Shortland’s ‘Berlin Syndrome’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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‘The Monaro’: Filmmaker Cate Shortland Returns to TV With Historical True Crime Miniseries

15 March 2017 11:11 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Cate Shortland has left the German settings of “The Berlin Syndrome” behind for a project set in her homeland.

The award-winning Australian filmmaker behind “Somersault” (starring Abbie Cornish) and the German wartime drama “Lore” will be trying her hand at a true crime limited series, reports If.com. The eight-part series, titled “The Monaro,” is a project that Shortland has been mulling over since her days at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School.

Read More: ‘Berlin Syndrome’ Trailer: Teresa Palmer Becomes Her Lover’s Prisoner in Cate Shortland’s Sundance Thriller

The series is set in the 1830s in the Monaro region of New South Wales, Australia, east of the Snowy Mountains — which is also where the filmmaker shot “Somersault.” That’s all that we know about the plot at the moment.

Shortland has her work cut out for her. “I’m working with this great team of people, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘The Monaro’: Filmmaker Cate Shortland Returns to TV With Historical True Crime Miniseries

15 March 2017 11:11 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Cate Shortland has left the German settings of “The Berlin Syndrome” behind for a project set in her homeland.

The award-winning Australian filmmaker behind “Somersault” (starring Abbie Cornish) and the German wartime drama “Lore” will be trying her hand at a true crime limited series, reports If.com. The eight-part series, titled “The Monaro,” is a project that Shortland has been mulling over since her days at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School.

Read More: ‘Berlin Syndrome’ Trailer: Teresa Palmer Becomes Her Lover’s Prisoner in Cate Shortland’s Sundance Thriller

The series is set in the 1830s in the Monaro region of New South Wales, Australia, east of the Snowy Mountains — which is also where the filmmaker shot “Somersault.” That’s all that we know about the plot at the moment.

Shortland has her work cut out for her. “I’m working with this great team of people, »

- Hanh Nguyen

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“Somersault” Director Cate Shortland Has a Miniseries in the Works

15 March 2017 10:02 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Cate Shortland: sydfilmfest/ YouTube

Australian filmmaker Cate Shortland is returning to the small screen. The “Somersault” and “Lore” director is working on an eight-part miniseries for Matchbox Pictures, The Playlist reports. Her previous TV credits include episodes of “The Secret Life of Us,” “Bad Cop, Bad Cop,” and the TV movie “The Silence.” Now she’ll take on “The Monaro.”

Set in the 1830s and based on a true crime case, the miniseries will center on six women. Shortland will shoot in Monaro, a region in the south of New South Wales, Australia that served as the location for 2004’s “Somersault,” her debut feature. “It’s one of my favorite places in the world to shoot so I wanted to do something again there,” she told If. The idea for the miniseries has been gestating for quite some time: Shortland first conceived the story in film school. The project is expected to begin filming this winter in Australia, or summer in the U.S.

Shortland is working on the script for “The Monaro” with a team of writers.

Berlin Syndrome,” Shortland’s latest film, made its world premiere at Sundance this year. The thriller stars Teresa Palmer (“Lights Out”) as an Australian photojournalist traveling in Berlin. Her intense romance with a local man (Max Riemelt, “Sense8”) turns into a nightmare when she realizes that he’s holding her captive. The film will open in theaters and stream on Netflix sometime this year.

When we asked Shortland her advice for other women directors, she said, “I think that what was the best thing for me was that I never considered myself different. I just worked in the same way and I fought for my films. I didn’t have to fight to be a female filmmaker; I just had to fight to make my films,” she explained. “But I think I come from a country where I’m very fortunate. I don’t think if you are from the Middle East or some parts of Europe, maybe even North America, you have that same opportunity. I think also working with other women helps. When women get together and support each other that really helps because that has been the history of our industry in Australia.”

Australia recently unveiled two new initiatives to support female filmmakers: Screen Australia introduced Doco180 for documentary filmmakers, and the National Film Board is pushing for more women in creatives roles in film.

Somersault” Director Cate Shortland Has a Miniseries in the Works was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Cate Shortland To Direct 8-Part TV Miniseries ‘The Monaro’

14 March 2017 2:59 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

While Cate Shortland came on our radar with 2004’s “Somersault,” she had a healthy TV career prior to that, helming episodes of “The Secret Life Of Us” and “Bad Cop, Bad Cop.” And between “Somersault” and her 2012’s feature “Lore,” she helmed the TV movie “The Silence.” Now, she’s set to embark on her biggest small screen effort yet.

Continue reading Cate Shortland To Direct 8-Part TV Miniseries ‘The Monaro’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Cate Shortland preps eight-parter 'The Monaro', set in 1830s, for Matchbox

13 March 2017 4:51 PM, PDT | IF.com.au | See recent IF.com.au news »

Cate Shortland on the set of 'Berlin Syndrome'.

Berlin Syndrome filmmaker Cate Shortland is prepping an eight-part series for Matchbox Pictures.

Titled The Monaro, the series will focus on six women in the 1830s and is based on a true crime case, the director told If.

Shortland will shoot in the titular region, east of the Snowy Mountains, where she also shot her debut feature, Somersault.

.It.s one of my favourite places in the world to shoot so I wanted to do something again there,. the helmer said..

Shortland is an experienced writer for TV, having written episodes of The Slap, Devil.s Playground, Deadline Gallipoli and The Kettering Incident, but this will mark the first series she has directed since The Secret Life of Us in 2003.

She also helmed TV movie The Silence, starring Richard Roxburgh and co-written by Picnic at Hanging Rock.s Alice Addison, »

- Harry Windsor

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Teresa Palmer Is Trapped In New Trailer For Cate Shortland’s ‘Berlin Syndrome’

1 March 2017 1:54 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The intensity of new love can often make you blind to the trouble signs, and that’s where things kick off in “Berlin Syndrome,” the new film from the always fascinating filmmaker Cate Shortland (“Somersault,” “Lore“).

Based on the book by Melanie Joosten, and starring Teresa Palmer and Max Riemelt, the story follows a young woman who travels to Berlin and falls in love, only to discover the relationship has taken on a sinister edge.

Continue reading Teresa Palmer Is Trapped In New Trailer For Cate Shortland’s ‘Berlin Syndrome’ at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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‘Berlin Syndrome’ Review: Teresa Palmer Elevates Cate Shortland’s Creepy Captivity Thriller — Sundance 2017

28 January 2017 11:14 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The problem with films that chronicle captivity is that there’s really only two ways they can go: the victim breaks free, or they don’t. The trick is making the journey worthwhile. Cate Shortland’s “Berlin Syndrome” packs plenty of twists into its overinflated 116-minute runtime, and most of them are enough to recommend the “Somersault” filmmaker’s latest crack at satisfying, female-driven cinema.

Bolstered by a strong performance from Teresa Palmer (who only gets better with each role, and seems happy to mix things up when it comes time to pick them), “Berlin Syndrome” doesn’t break much new ground in the genre, but it’s certainly a worthy entry into it.

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Sundance Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Aussie tourist Clare (Palmer) is starry-eyed from the start, arriving in Berlin with nothing but a hiker’s pack and a serious desire to explore. »

- Kate Erbland

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'Berlin Syndrome': Film Review | Sundance 2017

23 January 2017 12:03 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Australian director Cate Shortland brought a penetrating female gaze both to the jailbait protagonist of her lyrical first feature, Somersault, and the conflicted teenage Nazi offspring at the center of her German-language follow-up, Lore. But audiences looking for the illuminating perspective of an intelligent woman director on the kind of sexual-captivity scenario that dates back to The Collector might come away disappointed from Berlin Syndrome. Driven by a compellingly internalized performance from Teresa Palmer as the conflicted prey, this is a case of expert filmmaking craft applied to a familiar story that becomes unrelentingly grim and drawn out after its »

- David Rooney

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Berlin Syndrome’

22 January 2017 9:56 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Australian director Cate Shortland’s films trade in a kind of threatening beauty. Their surfaces are too immaculate, too exquisite, not to be masking messier, queasier ideas and impulses beneath: The reckless, harshly punished sexuality of a teenage girl in “Somersault,” or a youth’s dawning realization of her Nazi brainwashing in “Lore.” In “Berlin Syndrome,” Shortland’s equally, intensely elegant third feature, the ugly subversion of seductive exteriors is built into the film’s very narrative, as a heady, sexy holiday hook-up turns overnight into an abusive abduction — cuing a nightmarish game of sexual control and captivity, in which toxic masculinity calls the shots. Adapted from Melanie Joosten’s 2011 novel, this arresting, slightly over-extended conversation piece marks Shortland’s first foray into genre storytelling — though the film’s aloof tone and angular gender politics keep it in the arthouse domain.

That said, with sales already having proven brisk — a U. »

- Guy Lodge

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Sundance 2017 Women Directors: Meet Cate Shortland — “Berlin Syndrome”

18 January 2017 12:02 PM, PST | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Berlin Syndrome

Cate Shortland’s films have screened at film festivals around the world, including Cannes Film Festival and Sydney Film Festival. Her previous credits include “Somersault” and “Lore.”

Berlin Syndrome” will premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival on January 20.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Cs: A young Australian photographer, Clare, meets Andi at the lights in Berlin. Lust and intimacy are replaced by entrapment and obsession.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Cs: The mix of sex and both personal and state politics was potently interwoven through the novel the film is based on by [Australian author] Melanie Joosten. Clare is imprisoned by Andi. His parents were imprisoned by the state in the German Democratic Republic (Gdr). He is trying to create a bizarre utopia in his apartment in Berlin, with Clare as his created “girlfriend.”

I am fascinated by how she transcends her situation. How history is always present. How both Andi and Clare become ruled by the psychology of entrapment — he as the capturer and she as his prisoner. Clare cannot rely on anything or anyone. In the end, I fell in love with her resilience. She is a survivor.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Cs: What are we entrapped by? Why, as young women, are we still fed and half-believe the fairy tale of the strong male figure and the erotic fixation with the passive female? What is the nature of obsession and control within our fictions and realities?

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Cs: Staying true to the relationship between Clare and Andi. Not letting fear guide me while getting inside an obsessive, terrifying relationship where mutual need is still very strong. I had to stay true to this, even though at times I was so angry, so fearful.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Cs: In Australia, we are fortunate to be funded by government film agencies. Polly Staniford, our producer, also sought private investment within Australia, and we were supported by the wonderful people at Momento Films International.

W&H: What does it mean to have your film play at Sundance?

Cs: Sundance feels like a great fit for “Berlin Syndrome,” as it has always has a really interesting mix of documentaries, dramas, and genre films.

W&H: What’s the best and worse advice you’ve received?

Cs: The best is to keep making making work. Don’t stop. This is hard sometimes with kids and life. This is strong advice given to me by Jane Campion.

I forget the worst, as I didn’t take it.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Cs: Make work. Keep making work.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Cs: When I was 16, I saw “My Brilliant Career” by Gillian Armstrong. It had a profound effect on me personally, as it is the story of a young woman fighting to find her identity. The story landscape of the Brindabella mountain range was my landscape; when I was growing up, I could see it, snow-capped, out of my kitchen window. I still love the film.

I also love Lynne Ramsay’s “Morvern Callar” and many more, like Jennifer Peedom’s “Sherpa” and Andrea Arnold’s “Red Road.”

W&H: Have you seen opportunities for women filmmakers increase over the last year due to the increased attention paid to the issue? If someone asked you what you thought needed to be done to get women more opportunities to direct, what would be your answer?

Cs: In the last 40 years, we have had a real push from women to be involved in the film industry in Australia. This becomes harder and harder as opportunities for training and female-centered funds drop away.

I believe women haven’t “made it,” and this is obvious when we look at the percentage of films and TV series made by women. We need to push for more specialized female-centered film funding, training, and support.

Sundance 2017 Women Directors: Meet Cate Shortland — “Berlin Syndrome” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Kelsey Moore

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

20 items from 2017


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