The Merchant of Venice
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004

6 items from 2015


Why ‘Firefly’ alum Alan Tudyk literally worked up a sweat worrying of offending fans

20 October 2015 1:00 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Meta upon meta upon meta. That’s one of the best ways to describe “Con Man,” the delightfully self-referential new web series created by “Firefly” alum Alan Tudyk. The series, available to view on Vimeo, is about an actor named Wray Nerely, who, much like Tudyk, played a spaceship pilot in a short-lived sci-fi TV show that got canceled 10 years ago but has a cult following that just grows and grows. Tudyk plays Nerely, who has a much more begrudging attitude toward his life on the fan convention circuit than his real-life counterpart does. Nerely resents the fact that his canceled show (called “Spectrum” in the world of “Con Man,” where, amusingly, “Firefly” also exists) is the best thing he’s ever done. Tudyk’s resume has no shortage of greatness — from the hilarious British comedy “Death at a Funeral” to ABC sitcom “Suburgatory” to voices in “Frozen” and “Wreck-It-Ralph. »

- Emily Rome

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Julia Wilson-Dickson obituary

18 October 2015 7:53 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

My sister, Julia Wilson-Dickson, who has died aged 66 after a brain haemorrhage, was an eminent voice and dialect teacher who worked with many of the brightest talents of stage and film.

She coached Robert de Niro on Frankenstein (1994), Helena Bonham Carter on Mighty Aphrodite (1995), Julianne Moore for The End of the Affair (1999), Glenn Close on Albert Nobbs (2011), and Eddie Redmayne for the performance as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything (2014) that won him an Oscar. On stage she worked on several Peter Hall productions: with Dustin Hoffman as Shylock in The Merchant of Venice (Phoenix theatre, London, 1989), Vanessa Redgrave as Lady Torrance in Orpheus Descending (Haymarket, 1988), and Judi Dench and Anthony Hopkins in the title roles of Antony and Cleopatra (at the National Theatre, 1987).

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- Andrew Wilson-Dickson

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Julia Wilson-Dickson obituary

18 October 2015 7:53 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

My sister, Julia Wilson-Dickson, who has died aged 66 after a brain haemorrhage, was an eminent voice and dialect teacher who worked with many of the brightest talents of stage and film.

She coached Robert de Niro on Frankenstein (1994), Helena Bonham Carter on Mighty Aphrodite (1995), Julianne Moore for The End of the Affair (1999), Glenn Close on Albert Nobbs (2011), and Eddie Redmayne for the performance as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything (2014) that won him an Oscar. On stage she worked on several Peter Hall productions: with Dustin Hoffman as Shylock in The Merchant of Venice (Phoenix theatre, London, 1989), Vanessa Redgrave as Lady Torrance in Orpheus Descending (Haymarket, 1988), and Judi Dench and Anthony Hopkins in the title roles of Antony and Cleopatra (at the National Theatre, 1987).

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- Andrew Wilson-Dickson

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Bob & Co join Film London on Microwave International

21 July 2015 6:20 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The UK firm will raise around $310,000 (£200,000) in UK production finance for Microwave International: Shakespeare India; projects, teams, mentors announced.

Media investment firm Bob & Co is the latest company to invest in Film London’s mentoring and development scheme Microwave International: Shakespeare India.

Bob & Co will raise UK production finance for the project through an Enterprise Investment Scheme (Eis).

The scheme’s aim is to finance one feature with significant Asian and British Asian involvement with up to $780,000 (£500,000) and to theatrically release the film in 2016.

Andy Brunskill, of Bob & Co’s subsidiary Sums London, brokered the deal and will executive produce the selected feature.

Bob & Co will raise money through the Eis scheme, along with India’s Cinestaan Film Company, who partnered with Film London on the initiative in April.

The project will involve six teams of Asian writers, directors and producers from the UK and India honing ideas for Shakespeare-themed features in an intensive week-long microschool, which »

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Oscar-Nominated Actor Biggest Professional Regret: Turning Down 'Doctor Who'

19 June 2015 4:25 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ron Moody in Mel Brooks' 'The Twelve Chairs.' The 'Doctor Who' that never was. Ron Moody: 'Doctor Who' was biggest professional regret (See previous post: "Ron Moody: From Charles Dickens to Walt Disney – But No Harry Potter.") Ron Moody was featured in about 50 television productions, both in the U.K. and the U.S., from the late 1950s to 2012. These included guest roles in the series The Avengers, Gunsmoke, Starsky and Hutch, Hart to Hart, and Murder She Wrote, in addition to leads in the short-lived U.S. sitcom Nobody's Perfect (1980), starring Moody as a Scotland Yard detective transferred to the San Francisco Police Department, and in the British fantasy Into the Labyrinth (1981), with Moody as the noble sorcerer Rothgo. Throughout the decades, he could also be spotted in several TV movies, among them:[1] David Copperfield (1969). As Uriah Heep in this disappointing all-star showcase distributed theatrically in some countries. »

- Andre Soares

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Al Pacino’s Producer on Iran Nuclear Deal’s Possible Effect on Film Industry

1 June 2015 1:57 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Hollywood producer Barry Navidi has returned to his native Tehran after more than 15 years, just as Iran and the U.S. finesse final details of a possible nuclear accord that he and others hope may also help forge closer cinematic ties between the two countries.

Navidi spoke with to Variety in Tehran during the International Urban Cities Film Festival.

You grew up here, then you went to film school in London, and then to Hollywood where you’ve made movies, including “Divine Rapture” with Marlon Brando and, more recently, the Al Pacino films “The Merchant of Venice,” “Salome,” and “Wild Salome.” What brings you back to Tehran after 15 years?

I’d been meaning to come back, but I’ve been so busy. Now I’m on break from touring with Al and his one-man-show “An Evening With Al Pacino.” When Amir Esfandiari, director of international affairs of the Farabi Cinema Foundation, »

- Nick Vivarelli

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2004

6 items from 2015


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